Illinois Open Publishing Network – digital publishing from the University Library

“The Illinois Open Publishing Network (IOPN) is a set of digital publishing initiatives that are hosted and coordinated at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library. IOPN offers a suite of publishing services to members of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign community and beyond. We aim to facilitate the dissemination of high-quality, open access scholarly publications. Our services include infrastructure and support for publishing open access journals, monographs, born-digital projects that integrate multimedia and interactive content.

IOPN is committed to publishing high-quality open access works of lasting scholarly value across multiple disciplines, regardless of institutional affiliation. We particularly invite innovative digital publication projects that bring together multimedia and text. We additionally welcome partnerships with University Presses or other publishers in order to publish companion websites (such as a digital exhibit of related primary source materials) for traditional text monographs and articles….”

Publications | Free Full-Text | A Provisional System to Evaluate Journal Publishers Based on Partnership Practices and Values Shared with Academic Institutions and Libraries

Abstract:  Background: Journals with high impact factors (IFs) are the “coin of the realm” in many review, tenure, and promotion decisions, ipso facto, IFs influence academic authors’ views of journals and publishers. However, IFs do not evaluate how publishers interact with libraries or academic institutions. Goal: This provisional system introduces an evaluation of publishers exclusive of IF, measuring how well a publisher’s practices align with the values of libraries and public institutions of higher education (HE). Identifying publishers with similar values may help libraries and institutions make strategic decisions about resource allocation. Methods: Democratization of knowledge, information exchange, and the sustainability of scholarship were values identified to define partnership practices and develop a scoring system evaluating publishers. Then, four publishers were evaluated. A high score indicates alignment with the values of libraries and academic institutions and a strong partnership with HE. Results: Highest scores were earned by a learned society publishing two journals and a library publisher supporting over 80 open-access journals. Conclusions: Publishers, especially nonprofit publishers, could use the criteria to guide practices that align with mission-driven institutions. Institutions and libraries could use the system to identify publishers acting in good faith towards public institutions of HE. 

 

Publications | Free Full-Text | A Provisional System to Evaluate Journal Publishers Based on Partnership Practices and Values Shared with Academic Institutions and Libraries

Abstract:  Background: Journals with high impact factors (IFs) are the “coin of the realm” in many review, tenure, and promotion decisions, ipso facto, IFs influence academic authors’ views of journals and publishers. However, IFs do not evaluate how publishers interact with libraries or academic institutions. Goal: This provisional system introduces an evaluation of publishers exclusive of IF, measuring how well a publisher’s practices align with the values of libraries and public institutions of higher education (HE). Identifying publishers with similar values may help libraries and institutions make strategic decisions about resource allocation. Methods: Democratization of knowledge, information exchange, and the sustainability of scholarship were values identified to define partnership practices and develop a scoring system evaluating publishers. Then, four publishers were evaluated. A high score indicates alignment with the values of libraries and academic institutions and a strong partnership with HE. Results: Highest scores were earned by a learned society publishing two journals and a library publisher supporting over 80 open-access journals. Conclusions: Publishers, especially nonprofit publishers, could use the criteria to guide practices that align with mission-driven institutions. Institutions and libraries could use the system to identify publishers acting in good faith towards public institutions of HE. 

 

P2L4 to Convene University Presses, Libraries Virtually July 22—Open to Full ARL, AUPresses Membership – Association of Research Libraries

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and Association of University Presses (AUPresses) annually convene the P2L community—presses and libraries who share a reporting relationship. This year, we are opening up registration to this virtual meeting to all members of ARL and AUPresses. The theme of the 2020 P2L Summit, to be held Wednesday, July 22, 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m. EDT, is “University Presses and Libraries: Partners in Digital Transformation.”

The day will focus on how scholars are embracing digital technologies in their research and publishing practices and how presses and libraries can be stronger by working together to support the ambitions of these knowledge creators. The meeting is structured as three 90-minute sessions that will explore topical themes of shared interest between university presses and libraries. Topics will range from the macro-level of large-scale open-infrastructure initiatives to the micro-level of individual connections between press and library staff to advance digital scholarship. Each of the three sessions will include 30 minutes of short presentations, 45 minutes of break-out discussions, and a 15-minute focus on next steps for the P2L partnership….”

Academic Law Libraries and Scholarship: Communication, Publishing, and Ranking by Dana Neacsu, James M. Donovan :: SSRN

“After reviewing the background against which these challenges have appeared, we suggest that libraries define for themselves a more active role within scholarship production, which we define to include publication, distribution, access, and the process of scholarship impact assessment. The argument rests on the practical considerations of business organization. It is simply good business for law schools to curate the output of faculty scholarship, and many already do it through faculty repositories. Given that foundation, it seems logical for the library, as the institution which already manages those repositories, and which supports the students’ law reviews and journals in numerous ways, to step up and manage the full range of scholarship publication. This library management of student-edited scholarship production could cover all its aspects, excluding editorial publication decision and manuscript editing, from training and assisting to gather sources for cite checks, adding journal content to institutional platforms, administering technology services, and advising on copyright….”

Journal Best Practices Checklist: LPC – Google Docs

“This document organizes LPC’s resources related to journal publishing into a best practices ‘checklist.’ It isn’t comprehensive or authoritative, but will hopefully provide a starting point. With the exception of the Shared Documentation, all resources listed are freely available. New resources will be added to this list as they are created. In the meantime, we suggest also keeping an eye on the Library Publishing Workflows project, which is investigating and documenting journal publishing workflows in libraries. …”

Survey Extended: The State of Journal Production and Access

“f you haven’t had a chance to take “The State of Journal Production and Access” survey, there’s still time — we’ve extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. You can take the survey here. Read on for the full details.

Since the 12th of March 2020, Scholastica has been running a survey on “The State of Journal Production and Access” among scholarly societies, university presses, and university libraries that publish one or more journals independently (i.e., not outsourced to a separate publisher). The survey spans core aspects of journal production, including article formatting, layout, and metadata tagging processes and priorities, as well as different open access publishing and funding models. Scholastica is running this survey to develop an openly available report for the independent society and university journal publishing community on current production and access practices and future priorities.

If you work with a scholarly society or university publishing program, we invite you to take the survey, open now through the 5th of June, to help develop collective insights. The survey takes only around 5-10 minutes to complete. The information you submit for this survey will be published in an aggregated and anonymized form, and no personally identifying fields are required….”

Survey Extended: The State of Journal Production and Access

“f you haven’t had a chance to take “The State of Journal Production and Access” survey, there’s still time — we’ve extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. You can take the survey here. Read on for the full details.

Since the 12th of March 2020, Scholastica has been running a survey on “The State of Journal Production and Access” among scholarly societies, university presses, and university libraries that publish one or more journals independently (i.e., not outsourced to a separate publisher). The survey spans core aspects of journal production, including article formatting, layout, and metadata tagging processes and priorities, as well as different open access publishing and funding models. Scholastica is running this survey to develop an openly available report for the independent society and university journal publishing community on current production and access practices and future priorities.

If you work with a scholarly society or university publishing program, we invite you to take the survey, open now through the 5th of June, to help develop collective insights. The survey takes only around 5-10 minutes to complete. The information you submit for this survey will be published in an aggregated and anonymized form, and no personally identifying fields are required….”

Next Generation Library Publishing Infrastructure ProjectRequest For Ideas Survey

“The Next Generation Library Publishing project (NGLP) has a grant from Arcadia to invest in existing, emerging, and new infrastructure for library publishing, and we need your help in deciding how and where to invest those funds. This is your chance to help shape the future of library and other nonprofit publishing by identifying specific ways we might focus our project resources toward improvements large and small. 

Based on your experiences with existing publishing technologies and workflows, we request your input on how to improve the scholarly communication publishing infrastructure. Infrastructure projects might include new tools, improvements to existing tools, bridges between tools, hosted solutions, or even work on shared practice and standards. We are also interested in projects or initiatives that relate to this effort.
  
We are eager to see all your ideas, from single sentence wishes to brief proposals for already well-formulated plans. It may be something that you or your organization wants to work on or something that you wish others would do to make your life easier. No idea is too big or too small! …”

Encouraging Adherence to Values and Principles in Scholarly Publishing | Educopia Institute

“Through the Next Generation Library Publishing project (2019-2022), Educopia Institute, California Digital Library, and Stratos, in close collaboration with COAR, LYRASIS, and Longleaf Services, seek to improve the publishing pathways and choices available to authors, editors, and readers through strengthening, integrating, and scaling up scholarly publishing infrastructures to support library publishers. In addition to building publishing tools and workflows, our team is exploring how to create community hosting models that align explicitly and demonstratively with academic values. …”