MyScienceWork, a scientific platform in open access – Paris Innovation Review

“The MyScienceWork scientific platform was launched in 2012 by Virginie Simon and Tristan Davaille with the aim of making scientific knowledge accessible to the largest possible public. A part of the open access movement, it now provides access to 70 million multidisciplinary scientific articles and 12 million patents. The main activity of this start-up, which has offices in Paris, Luxembourg and San Francisco, consists of the analysis of scientific data, which it undertakes both for educational and research institutions and for businesses….”

Research: Sci-Hub provides access to nearly all scholarly literature | eLife | Daniel Scott Himmelstein et al.

“Abstract: The website Sci-Hub enables users to download PDF versions of scholarly articles, including many articles that are paywalled at their journal’s site. Sci-Hub has grown rapidly since its creation in 2011, but the extent of its coverage was unclear. Here we report that, as of March 2017, Sci-Hub’s database contains 68.9% of the 81.6 million scholarly articles registered with Crossref and 85.1% of articles published in toll access journals. We find that coverage varies by discipline and publisher, and that Sci-Hub preferentially covers popular, paywalled content. For toll access articles, we find that Sci-Hub provides greater coverage than the University of Pennsylvania, a major research university in the United States. Green open access to toll access articles via licit services, on the other hand, remains quite limited. Our interactive browser at https://greenelab.github.io/scihub allows users to explore these findings in more detail. For the first time, nearly all scholarly literature is available gratis to anyone with an Internet connection, suggesting the toll access business model may become unsustainable.”

Open up access to advance healthcare – Yiba | Be informed. Be more. Because you can.

“Within a context categorised by an already small emergency medicine research output, one in six African emergency care publications is inaccessible to African researchers. This was the finding of a paper published by Associate (now visiting) Professor Stevan Bruijns together with two undergraduate health science students, Mmapheladi Mosly Maesela and Suniti Sinha. The research was conducted during Bruijns’s special study module with the second-year students. The team set out to determine the level of access that African emergency medicine researchers had to each other’s work. In an examination of 666 publications from 49 journals (59.3% of which were open access), they found that 105 of the publications (15.8%) were cost-prohibitive….”

Prof Randy Schekman: Giving Science To The People

“It is a peculiar situation when commercial science journals can not only ask investigators to pay for the privilege of sending in their work but also charge universities and others for the privilege of accessing work that was publicly funded.”

Tear Down That Paywall: The Movement to Make Ocean Research Free — Oceans Deeply

“As scientists race to save coral reefs and tackle other crucial marine issues, access to expensive scientific journals has become a roadblock to sharing knowledge, especially for researchers in developing countries….

…Open Communications for The Ocean (OCTO), a Woodinville, Washington-based nonprofit that recently launched a marine science research “repository” called MarXiv. Its goal is to systematically make more marine research freely accessible….”

Elsevier declines to cut off German universities that cancelled journal subs | News | Chemistry World

“Efforts to reach a deal between the publishing giant and 200 institutions protesting prices continue after January deadline passes German universities and research institutes that cancelled their subscriptions to Elsevier journals in a protest over pricing still have access to them. This is despite a breakdown in talks last month. A consortium of German institutions, Project Deal, has been trying to negotiate a nationwide deal for the entire portfolio of electronic journals from the Dutch publishing giant since 2016. The consortium, which includes the country’s National Academy of Sciences, the Fraunhofer Society and the German Research Foundation, wants all papers authored by the country’s researchers to be open access in Germany and pricing that ensures costs are only incurred at publication. This would mean that corresponding authors could make papers freely available without paying any more. It’s understood that if these demands were met the amount that these institutions pay to Elsevier would be halved….”

About oaDOI | MIT Libraries

“This link to an open access version of an article comes through oadoi.org, which indexes millions of articles and delivers open-access full-text versions over an open API. The MIT Libraries are excited to offer this new path to access scholarly content. oaDOI is a contribution to an open access infrastructure that, by taking readers to versions of articles that are not behind paywalls, supports MIT’s aim of democratizing access to information. …”