Open Access is for life and not just for compliance – Medically speaking…

“In deciding where to publish our research, we have to consider why we do research. While some of us would probably undertake research for the intellectual challenge or excitement of discovery alone, for many of us it is important that our research will impact society in some way. This may be from contributing to the advance of our scientific discipline, or through the use of our research by the public, policymakers or industry. For all of these to come to pass, there is a basic premise that our publications can be found and accessed by those who can make use of the information they contain. Hence one of the key decisions around choice of where to publish is to think of the audience that reads the journal, and whether to make your paper Open Access.”

Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework

Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework

  1. 1. Understanding Open Science: Definitions and framework Dr. Nancy Pontika Open Access Aggregation Officer CORE Twitter: @nancypontika
  2. 2. What is Open Science
  3. 3. Research Lifecycle: as simple as it gets Idea Methodology Data Collection Analysis Publish
  4. 4. Idea Methodology Data Collection Analysis Publish Journal article, Dissertation, Book, Source Code, etc. Experiments, Interviews, Observations, etc. Numbers, Code, Text, Images, sound records, etc. Statistics, processes, analysis, documentation, etc. Research Lifecycle: focus on the steps”

S01 E05 | The Case for Open Access Research with Peter Suber from the Harvard Open Access Project | Digi*Pub

“Why is so much research being published in this format? What exactly is Open Access research and why is it important to research institutions and researchers? How have traditional journal publishers responded to Open Access? What are universities and other research institutions doing to curate and collect Open Access research? Can we rely on for-profit Open Access publishers to preserve research when their profit motives change? Peter Suber sits down with Digi*Pub host Jack Cashman of the Harvard Alumni Association to talk through these questions in light of the Harvard Open Access Project’s goal to encourage the growth of open access to research at Harvard and beyond….”

Open Access (the book) – Harvard Open Access Project

The home page for Peter Suber’s book, Open Access (MIT Press, 2012), with a growing collection of updates and supplements, and links to reviews, translations, and OA editions.

[English > Any] For anyone who supports the open-access movement in academia… : translator

“If you want to make a difference and help expand the open-access movement across the world, please send a translation of the above document to the listed email (little.prince@custodians.online). If your language is already listed, feel free to check if there are any corrections that can be made, and send those instead! The present ones are oftentimes not completely error-free.”

David Brown, Access to Scientific Research: Challenges Facing Communications in STM

“The debate about access to scientific research raises questions about the current effectiveness of scholarly communication processes. This [Nov 2015] book explores, from an independent point of view, the current state of the STM publishing market, new publishing technologies and business models as well as the information habit of researchers, the politics of research funders, and the demand for scientific research as a public good. The book also investigates the democratisation of science including how the information needs of knowledge workers outside academia can be embraced in future….”

The Open Access Movement | ikangablog

“There’s so much good free stuff online (Khan Academy! Coursera! Caltech Authors!—the list goes on and on) that it’s easy to feel overwhelmed, perhaps even jaded by it all.

But it’s inspiring how people use these resources. I open CUNY Academic Works and look at the map and see where the downloads are coming from—Nebraska, California, and Ohio in the U.S.; Brisbane, Australia; Airai, Palau; Akershus, Norway. People are looking at papers about Italian architecture, media representations of Asian-Americans, rhetoric and violence.

I look at stories people have shared about how they have used the open access publications. There’s a nurse in an Australian aboriginal community who entertained herself in her remote location by accessing scholarship about Cormac McCarthy. There’s a high school debater in the U.S. who does her research in institutional repositories because she cannot access scholarship behind a paywall. There’s a scientist in Mexico whose investigation in climate change is aided by research shared by other scientists and offered free of charge.”