How to find and access peer-reviewed studies (for free) | The Logic of Science

“Let’s start with where to look. You can try simply doing a standard Google search, but odds are that you will get flooded with tons of blogs and websites, and it is a pretty inefficient way to find what you are after. A much better option is to use a database specifically tailored to peer-reviewed literature. There are two major ones that are freely available that I’m going to talk about: Google Scholar and PubMed (there are many others that are behind paywalls, but I am going to assume that most people reading this are not academics and don’t have access to those)….”

Free UKSG webinar – Working with Open Access | UKSG

“This webinar will introduce attendees to the basic concepts of Open Access and how they work together to build wider access to knowledge. Attendees will also be encouraged to think about the different ways in which librarians can build their skills and get involved in this rapidly growing and exciting area….”

New Opportunities in Libraries: Open Access, Open Content, and Collection: Library & Information Science Book Chapter | IGI Global

Abstract:  The emergence of open access is one of the most significant changes to the world of scholarly publications since the migration from print to digital publishing began. Reports of some authors have demonstrated how libraries across the membership are changing, in response to a need for new services and an increasingly diverse client group. In order to contribute to the existing knowledge in the area of open access movement in libraries, this chapter discusses how the 21st century library provides a service that can open access to knowledge for the growth and development of communities they serve by highlighting the concept of open access and open content, roles of libraries in open access initiative as well as library collection development and open access. This chapter also sheds light on legal and ethical issues in open access and the future of open access in libraries.

Open Science in Switzerland: Opportunities and Challenges

“Open Science stands for a new approach to the scientific process, based on cooperative work and new ways of making knowledge available. It is thus an umbrella term for various movements aiming to remove the barriers to sharing any kind of output, resources, methods or tools, at any stage of the research process (Figure 1).1 Here, we focus on the open access to scientific literature and to data because of their particularly high relevance to the scientific community in Switzerland, at which this factsheet is primarily addressed. Both Open Access and Open Data are important science policy topics in different parts of the world, but the developments in Europe are most pertinent for Switzerland. This factsheet therefore presents the issues at stake in the on-going discussion in Europe and Switzerland, points out opportunities and addresses challenges. The recommendations are guided by the key consideration to shape Open Access and Open Data so that they foster scientific progress and benefit society.”

Scientific Research Shouldn’t Sit behind a Paywall – Scientific American Blog Network

Most of the scientific research conducted in the U.S. and abroad is supported by federal government funds — that is to say, by taxpayer dollars. Yet much of the information that results from such funding is not publicly available outside of research institutions that can afford expensive scientific journal subscriptions.

Instead, students, doctors, researchers and the public often have to pay a fee of some $40 per article to read the latest scientific research. As a result, physicians, for instance, may not be able to read a paper with direct relevance to their clinical practice….

This is just not right.

Luckily, there’s a solution: open access. Open access is the idea that scientific literature, which was paid for largely by public funds, including author fees, should be available for all….

Unfortunately, commercial publishers have been slow to adopt the open access model for fear that it might reduce their sizable profit margins. The world’s largest scientific publisher, Elsevier, for example, enjoys a profit margin of about 40 percent for its publishing division — larger than that of nearly every other publicly traded corporation in the world….”

 

The open access wars: How to free science from academic paywalls – Vox

“This is a story about more than subscription fees. It’s about how a private industry has come to dominate the institutions of science, and how librarians, academics, and even pirates are trying to regain control.

The University of California is not the only institution fighting back. “There are thousands of Davids in this story,” says University of California Davis librarian MacKenzie Smith, who, like so many other librarians around the world, has been pushing for more open access to science. “But only a few big Goliaths.”

Will the Davids prevail?…”

cOALition S and Plan S: explained | European Heart Journal | Oxford Academic

cOAlition S signals the commitment to implement, by 1 January 2020, the necessary measures to fulfil its main principle: ‘By 2020 scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants provided by participating national and European research councils and funding bodies, must be published in compliant Open Access Journals or on compliant Open Access Platforms’.

cOAlition S currently comprises 13 national research funding organizations and two charitable foundations from 13 countries who have agreed to implement the 10 principles of Plan S in a coordinated way, together with the European Commission and the ERC….

An implementation task force, led by John-Arne Røttingen (RCN) and David Sweeney (UKRI), will now collaborate with other stakeholders and work towards the swift and practical implementation of these principles….”