Wikidata, Wikibase and the library linked data ecosystem: an OCLC Research Library Partnership discussion – Hanging Together

“n late July the OCLC Research Library Partnership convened a discussion that reflected on the current state of linked data. The discussion format was (for us) experimental — we invited participants to prepare by viewing a pre-recorded presentation, Re-envisioning the fabric of the bibliographic universe – From promise to reality* The presentation covers experiences of national and research libraries as well as OCLC’s own journey in linked data exploration. OCLC Researchers Annette Dortmund and Karen Smith-Yoshimura looked at relevant milestones in the journey from entity-based description research, prototypes, and on to actual practices, based on work that has been undertaken with library partners right up to the present day….”

How your library will benefit from linked data

“When operationalized, linked data will provide participating libraries with:

A massive collection of descriptive information and identifiers for creative works, persons, and other things libraries need to refer to
The capability to enhance these descriptions, or add them for things missing from the collection
An ecosystem (including a lightweight UI and APIs) that will allow library workers to create linked data natively, instead of through conversion from MARC
Tools to reconcile local library metadata with that of the ecosystem, and connect library metadata with nonlibrary sources….”

DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly: A Prosopography as Linked Open Data: Some Implications from DPRR

Abstract:  The Digital Prosopography of the Roman Republic (DPRR) project has created a freely available structured prosopography of people from the Roman Republic. As a part of this work the materials that were produced by the project have been made available as Linked Open Data (LOD): translated into RDF, and served through an RDF Server. This article explains what it means to present the material as Linked Open Data by means of working, interactive examples. DPRR didn’t do some of the work which has been conventionally associated with Linked Open Data. However, by considering the two conceptions of the Semantic Web and Linked Open Data as proposed by Tim Berners-Lee one can see how DPRR’s RDF Server fits best into the LOD picture, including how it might serve to facilitate new ways to explore its material. The article gives several examples of ways of exploiting DPRR’s RDF dataset, and other similarly structured materials, to enable new research approaches.

 

Modelling Overlay Peer Review Processes with Linked Data Notifications

In November 2017, the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) published a report outlining the technologies and behaviours of the Next Generation Repository (NGR). In the report, the NGR Working Group argues that repositories must take their place in a resource-centric network, where the individual resources (metadata and actual content) within the repositories are interconnected on the Web both with each other and, more importantly with resource-oriented networked services. These links between resources and overlay services can bring many new opportunities for broadening the scope of the services offered by repositories and 3rd party initiatives. The emphasis on moving to a fully resource-centric paradigm presented in the vision for the Next Generation Repository offers an opportunity to exploit what programmers call “pass by reference” – a notion which underlies the fundamental function of the Web.

One specific use case related to this vision is the linking of repository resources with services providing commentary, annotation and peer reviews; a use case that is currently being considered by several different initiatives in the scholarly communications landscape. The wide distribution of resources (typified by articles) in repositories, coupled with the growing interest in overlay journals, introduces the possibility of adopting an asynchronous notification paradigm to achieve interoperability between repositories and peer review systems….”

Introduction to Democratic Openbook Humanism and LODLIBs | Zenodo

“Hypothesis 1. If we humans create and share LODLIBs for free with the world, those books will make us free individually.

 

Hypothesis 2. If we humans connect our LODLIBs with each other’s LODLIBs, that will make us free socially.

 

Hypothesis 3. If we humans demand that enslaved digital books become LODLIBs, too, then that will make the whole world and almost all of its knowledge free.

 

Put all three into practice, and the vast majority of scientific and cultural knowledge can truly become universal, which is exactly what it should be. That’s one of the foundational principles of librarianship….

 

A LODLIB is a Linked Open Data Living Informational Book….”

Library’s linked-data project gets new grant | Cornell Chronicle

“A $2.5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is boosting a multi-institution initiative to develop tools and workflows that improve the sharing of catalog data among libraries and help internet users discover library resources on the web.

Known as Linked Data for Production, the project is part of a long-term collaboration among Cornell University Library, Stanford Libraries and the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Iowa.

Through linked data, information about books and other items in library records will be enhanced by related information from external online sources….”

Library’s linked-data project gets new grant | Cornell Chronicle

“A $2.5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is boosting a multi-institution initiative to develop tools and workflows that improve the sharing of catalog data among libraries and help internet users discover library resources on the web.

Known as Linked Data for Production, the project is part of a long-term collaboration among Cornell University Library, Stanford Libraries and the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Iowa.

Through linked data, information about books and other items in library records will be enhanced by related information from external online sources….”

LINCS – Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship

“Human brains work through a vast web of interconnections, but the web that researchers increasingly use to understand human culture and history has few meaningful links. Linked Infrastructure for Networked Cultural Scholarship (LINCS) will create the conditions to think differently, with machines, about human culture in Canada….

The LINCS infrastructure project will convert large datasets into an organized, interconnected, machine-processable set of resources for Canadian cultural research….

LINCS aims to provide context for the cultural material that currently floats around online, interlink it, ground it in its sources, and help to make the World Wide Web a trusted resource for scholarly knowledge production….

With a team of technical and domain experts, LINCS will allow Canadian scholars and partner institutions to play a significant role in the developing the Semantic Web.”

KNOWLEDGE BASE ON EPIDEMICS FROM AMELICA/REDALYC JOURNALS

“In the face of a global health contingency, the vital role of Open Access is endorsed: to bring knowledge to all corners of the world, to allow science to be quickly and timely accessible so that its contribution is reflected in the improvement of the quality of human life , in saving lives and in the development of a better society for all. Open Access initiatives such as Redalyc have been working towards this goal for 18 years. Today, the AmeliCA/Redalyc alliance reaffirms its commitment to Open Access and continues to develop technology which it is now applied to the semantic dissemination of articles published on topics of interest in epidemiology, pandemics and related topics. This development enable to publish more than 6 thousand articles in Linked Open Data (LOD) format so that they can be processed and interconnected in the LOD knowledge cloud and allow users to browse content and access to full-texts in a thematic discovery service….”
 

AmeliCA/Redalyc1 run an ontology-based algorithm, previously developed called OntoOAI (Becerril-Garci?a & Aguado-Lopez, 2018), on their databases to extract epidemics-related content. The results include: an ontology representation of the knowledge published in 6,557 scientific articles including concepts and relations, as well as their attributes, a directed-graph thematic content browser to access to full-texts and a dataset available at SPARQL endpoint to query the results as part of Linked Open Data….”