NAFTA Negotiations: Authors Alliance Joins Public Interest Groups in Support of Transparency and Balanced Copyright Policy | Authors Alliance

“Today, Authors Alliance joins with other public interest advocates such as Creative Commons, SPARC, Internet Archive, OpenMedia, and Public Knowledge to sign on to a statement in support of transparency and balanced copyright policy in the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The statement was sent to the trade ministries of Mexico, the U.S. and Canada, urging all three countries to make trade negotiation processes more transparent, inclusive, and accountable.

Closed-door trade agreements are not the right forum to create intellectual property policy, particularly when negotiations lack transparency. It is critically important that drafts of international agreements that address intellectual property issues be publicly available for comment so that authors and other stakeholders can weigh in on the proposed rules that will bind all member states. Moreover, such agreements are not flexible enough to account for rapid changes in technology.”

Implementing a Public Access Policy: A Guide for HRA Member Organizations; and HRA Member Public Access Policy Template

“To assist HRA [Health Research Alliance] member organizations wishing to adopt a public access policy, the HRA Public Access Task Group partnered with the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to enable HRA member-funded awardees/grantees* to deposit their publications into PubMed Central (PMC)….The following is a template developed by the HRA Public Access Task Group in conjunction with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) that can be used by organizations seeking to implement public access policies as a condition of award funding. This template is based on the policy developed by HRA member organization, Autism Speaks. …”

Campus open-access policy “Choice Points”

“The basic policy framework recommended in this document highlights the institution’s ability to play a central role in the stewardship of the scholarly record generated by its faculty. The framework is straightforward; campus OA policies require authors to make manuscripts available for deposit in an institution’s repository at the time they are accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Authors automatically grant the institution the right to make their manuscripts openly accessible. At the same time, authors may request a waiver, or “opt out,” of the institutional license for a given article if needed to accommodate a pressing individual circumstance….”

Browse Data Sharing Requirements by Federal Agency

“This community resource for tracking, comparing, and understanding both current and future U.S. federal funder research data sharing policies is a joint project of SPARC & Johns Hopkins University Libraries. Click the icons below to select up to three agencies to view or compare. Click here to download the full data set….”

January 2017 SPARC Innovator: ASAPbio

“Ron Vale says he’s had a great run at science and now wants to focus on improving biomedical research for the next generation.

 

“I’ve had this magical life doing this work that I loved and now feel a moral obligation to make sure other young people can live that dream,” says the 58-year-old professor of cellular and molecular pharmacology at the University of California San Francisco.

 

Just how to attract and retain young scientists in the field is complicated, but Vale says one tangible way is to change the culture of how science is communicated and accelerate the process.

 

To address the issue, Vale wrote an opinion piece in biorXiv.org in July of 2015 in which he suggested that biologists consider using preprints to communicate their findings in parallel with using conventional journal publication. The idea of sharing preprints – drafts of scholarly articles posted online prior to publication in a peer-reviewed journal – attracted attention. Preprints are widely used in the physics, mathematics, and computer science communities, but were largely unknown and minimally used in biology in 2015….”

Open Research Funders Group

“The Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) is a partnership of funding organizations committed to the open sharing of research outputs. This will benefit society by accelerating the pace of discovery, reducing information-sharing gaps, encouraging innovation, and promoting reproducibility. The ORFG will speak in an amplified voice, and engage a range of stakeholders to develop actionable principles and policies that enable sharing and collaboration across the global research enterprise….The Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) has its genesis in an October, 2015, meeting convened by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC).  This forum of open access stakeholders included representatives from more than 50 organizations.  It offered a unique opportunity for participants to share experiences, concerns, strategies, and questions regarding open access and open data….The Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) will confer regularly to develop actionable principles and programs that can be used by research funders to accelerate access to research and underlying data….”

The inaugural membmers are the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, American Heart Association, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, John Templeton Foundation, Laura and John Arnold Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, and the Robert Woods Johnson Foundations.