ROIS-DS Center for Open Data in the Humanities (CODH)

“Center for Open Data in the Humanities / CODH, Joint Support-Center for Data Science Research, Research Organization of Information and Systems has the following missions toward the promotion of data-driven research and formation of the collaborative center in humanities research.

1. We establish a new discipline of data science-driven humanities, or digital humanities, and establish the center of excellence across organizations through the promotion of openness.
2. We develop “deep access” to the content of humanities data by state-of-the-art technologies in the area of informatics and statistics.
3. We aggregate, process and deliver humanities knowledge from Japan to the world through collaboration across organizations and countries.
4. We promote citizen science and open innovation based on open data and applications….”

IPLC Launches the Greater China Archival Resources Web Archive – Ivy Plus Libraries

“The Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation is pleased to announce the launch of the Greater China Archival Resources Web Archive.

One of the hurdles researchers of modern and contemporary China face in their studies is knowing about, and having access to, archival collections held at Chinese archives. The Greater China Archival Resources Web Archive collects websites belonging to established, physical archives and learned archival societies located in the Greater China region, and archival projects from or about the Greater China region. Under the Chinese government, local archives administratively operate under the guidance of the local archival bureaus which themselves are part of local government and responsible for archival management for entire geographical areas. Therefore, the information available on the websites not only covers the collections that are held in each of the physical archives, but also includes policies, news, reports, research articles, and publications that are related to archival management in respective provinces, cities, or countries. Curated by librarians within the Ivy Plus Libraries Confederation, the Archive aims to provide stable reference to the born-digital content originating from Chinese archives for future access, and attempts to capture the changes of these websites over time, thus documenting political change in China….”

Michigan Asian Studies Open Access Books Collection Launches – University of Michigan Press Blog

“The University of Michigan Press in collaboration with the Centers for Chinese, Japanese, South Asian and Southeast Asian Studies is pleased to announce the launch of the Michigan Asian Studies Open Access Books Collection. Jointly sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Humanities Open Book Program has made outstanding out-of-print and hard-to-find humanities books available to a wide audience. Under this program, the University has made 100 significant books about Asia published under its auspices freely and publicly available online. …”

Asia OA Meeting 2020

“Recently, the wave of the 4th industry has changed our lives greatly. In addition, Corona 19 is accelerating this further. In the research world, open science is getting more attention than open access and open data. In time, KISTI hosted the Asian OA Meeting 2020. The conference will not only provide you with the latest trends in open science, but will also serve as a venue for information exchange between Asian countries. Since this conference will be held online due to Corona 19, anyone can attend anywhere, so I hope that many people will participate to broaden their knowledge of open science and discuss ways to develop it.”

Adopting open access in the social sciences and humanities: evidence from a developing nation: Heliyon

Abstract:  Open Access (OA) publishing, with ambitious movements such as Plan S, is engendering radical changes among academic publishers. Emerging countries need to keep publishing as well as adopt open access to catch up with the changes. Using exclusive data from the Social Sciences & Humanities Peer Awards (SSHPA) database, the study employed both descriptive statistics and a Bayesian linear regression model to examine the journals and publishers in which Vietnamese social scientists published during the period 2008–2019, and the potential of pursuing the OA movement in Vietnam. We found an increasing diversification in the publishing sources of Vietnamese social science researchers with growth rates of 9.8% and 14.1% per annum in the number of publishers and journals, respectively. Given that the proportion of Gold OA articles had a fourfold increase over the examined period, it seems that the Vietnamese academic community is adopting OA. Furthermore, Bayesian analysis results hint at positive associations of internal and external collaborative power (number of domestic and foreign authors, respectively) with the decision to publish in OA (?b_TotalVN_OpenAccess = 0.22; ?b_TotalForeign_OpenAccess = 0.15). The results and its implications suggest that Vietnamese policymakers and university director boards should facilitate as well as control the quality of the scientific publishing and the OA movement.

 

 

Adopting open access in the social sciences and humanities: evidence from a developing nation: Heliyon

Abstract:  Open Access (OA) publishing, with ambitious movements such as Plan S, is engendering radical changes among academic publishers. Emerging countries need to keep publishing as well as adopt open access to catch up with the changes. Using exclusive data from the Social Sciences & Humanities Peer Awards (SSHPA) database, the study employed both descriptive statistics and a Bayesian linear regression model to examine the journals and publishers in which Vietnamese social scientists published during the period 2008–2019, and the potential of pursuing the OA movement in Vietnam. We found an increasing diversification in the publishing sources of Vietnamese social science researchers with growth rates of 9.8% and 14.1% per annum in the number of publishers and journals, respectively. Given that the proportion of Gold OA articles had a fourfold increase over the examined period, it seems that the Vietnamese academic community is adopting OA. Furthermore, Bayesian analysis results hint at positive associations of internal and external collaborative power (number of domestic and foreign authors, respectively) with the decision to publish in OA (?b_TotalVN_OpenAccess = 0.22; ?b_TotalForeign_OpenAccess = 0.15). The results and its implications suggest that Vietnamese policymakers and university director boards should facilitate as well as control the quality of the scientific publishing and the OA movement.

 

 

DORA Community Call: Strategies for responsible research assessment in the Asia-Pacific region – DORA

“DORA is pleased to announce its first webinar for the Asia-Pacific region with the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group on Thursday, July 2 at 12:00 PM Australian Eastern Standard Time (10:00 AM China Standard Time). The webinar is open to all and will provide an update from DORA and offer ideas about strategies to implement responsible research assessment practices….”

5,000 rare and unique maps are now available online

“Over 5,000 unique maps from the Asia-Pacific Map Collection are now available online as part of an ongoing project by The Australian National University’s College of Asia and the Pacific.

This significant portion of the college’s map collection is now available on Open Research for people to download and enjoy for free.

 

The collection is home to a variety of topographic, cadastral, aeronautical, and thematic maps, some of which date back hundreds of years….”

Building new societies: Insights and predictions from the 5th Wiley Society Member Survey – Roscoe – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Ten years ago, research conducted by the Biosciences Federation found that 60% of responders said they read OA journals, and 25% said that they published in them. Although a minority had claimed to have published in more than one OA journal, ‘they were not always able to distinguish between (fully or optionally) OA journals and other resources’ (Morris & Thorn, 2009). In fact, 31% of the journals mentioned were not OA journals at all. Over the course of our annual surveys, we have seen the understanding and significance of OA increase. In this year’s survey, 80% recognized the description of open research and 78% open science, for example, and only hybrid OA received the relatively low recognition rating of 61%. OA has moved from being a side issue to one of central importance, particularly among students, ECRs, and those in Africa and Central Asia. In last year’s survey, supporting OA was the sixth most important thing a society should do (65%), far behind publishing a journal (89%) and providing education and training (83%). In the current survey, it is the top service of which members want to see more. There is less interest in the USA (47%) and among senior members (61%), but if you are a student (85%) based in Africa (84%) or have less than 5?years’ experience (75%), then increased OA publishing is a major motivation towards society membership (see Fig. 6)….”