Presseinformationen – Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren

From Google’s English: “16 centers of the Helmholtz Association have terminated their license agreements with the scientific publishing house Elsevier at the end of 2017. With this decision the Elsevier contracts of all Helmholtz centers expire, whose contracts end on 31.12.2017. This means that the largest German research organization has now joined the more than one hundred scientific institutions that have terminated or extended their license agreements with Elsevier in order to strengthen the negotiating position of the DEAL project. Since 2016 representatives of the DEAL project on behalf of the alliance of the German scientific organizations with the publishing house Elsevier negotiate a nationwide licensing of magazines. The negotiations are very difficult, which is why the exit is now a clear sign….The President of the Helmholtz Association, Professor Dr. Otmar D. Wiestler, explains: “The Helmholtz Association will not conclude its own license agreements with Elsevier. We promote the changeover of the publication system to Open Access and therefore support the objectives of the DEAL project.” The most important goals [of the DEAL project] are: [1] All scientific institutions involved in the DEAL contract have full-time access to the full range of e-journals from Elsevier. [2] All publications by authors from German institutions are automatically submitted to Open Access (CC-BY, including peer review). [3] Appropriate pricing according to a simple, future-oriented calculation model that is oriented to the volume of publications….Dr. Martin Köhler, DESY’s director of the library and former negotiator for the Helmholtz contracts with Elsevier has no reservations about the literature supply: “The experiences of the” dropouts “at the beginning of the year showed that a contractless situation can be solved without problems. The Helmholtz libraries are well positioned and expect to be able to reliably provide the scientists with the necessary articles, even during longer lasting negotiations.”

FWF-E-Book-Library :: Forschungsinfrastruktur

From Google’s English: “The FWF-E-Book-Library is a repository for the open-access publication of self-supporting publications funded by the FWF. Idente electronic copies of all publications submitted since December 2011 and funded by the FWF will be made available free of charge and free of charge in the FWF E-Book Library on the Internet. The joint open-access archiving of the supported books is intended to ensure a better visibility and further dissemination of the scientific publications on the Internet. For the publications to be found by their readers, the electronic copies are provided with a licensing model of the Creative Commons licenses as well as with metadata, which are linked to international scientific platforms and search engines. 

The FWF archives in the FWF-E-Book-Library not only all publications supported since 2011, but also all books published by the FWF and published since the year 2000, to which the FWF from the authors and the publishers the necessary rights were….”

Charité, FU, HU und TU kündigen ihre Elsevier-Verträge

From Google’s English: “Ladies and gentlemen, ladies and gentlemen, Since 2016, under the auspices of the President of the University Rectors’ Conference (HRK), Prof. Dr. Horst Hippler, with Elsevier over a nationwide License to use the publisher’s magazines. Objective of the negotiations Of the DEAL project, the magazine portfolios of the publishers Elsevier, Springer / Nature and Wiley from a subscription-based licensing to a publication-based financing To be transferred. A fair price model for the provision of the open- Access-based journals and counteracted the previous price spiral become. Regrettably, Elsevier has so far shown little negotiation. Therefore, have Numerous scientific institutions and universities signed their contracts with Elsevier Terminated or not extended, to the DEAL negotiations the necessary emphasis to lend. More than 70 scientific institutions have grown into this step in 2016 determined. In the coming weeks, more than 100 more Research institutes and universities….”

Open Access-Monographien – Rudolf Mumenthaler

English Translation (Google): Open Access Monographs

“Es wirkt ja schon widersprüchlich, wenn eine Monographie zu Open Access zunächst geschlossen publiziert wird und erst in einem Jahr unter einer CC-BY-Lizenz freigegeben wird. Ich kenne allerdings dieses Dilemma auch aus Autorensicht und möchte mich vor diesem Hintergrund zur aktuellen Kritik am Praxishandbuch Open Access äussern.”

English Translation (Google): “It is already contradictory if a monograph on Open Access is first published in a closed version and is only released in a year under a CC-BY license. I know, however, this dilemma also from authoring and would like to express myself against this background to the current criticism of the Praxishandbuch Open Access.”

De Gruyter bündelt Open Access-Aktivitäten

From Google’s English: “The independent Berlin publishing house De Gruyter re-organizes its open access business. The editorial part of the open access business will be more integrated into the existing editorial sector. In addition, a separate business unit will be set up to provide open access publishing services to universities, institutions and scientific societies.

The new company will be managed by Jacek Ciesielski as Vice President of Publishing Services. Ciesielski will focus his long-term expertise and energy on the development of publishing services for high-quality third-party publishing, for which De Gruyter does not provide a peer-review process.

Jacek Ciesielski is the founder of the Open Access publishing company Versita, which was acquired by De Gruyter in the year 2012 under the De Gruyter Open brand. Ciesielski has successfully advanced the open access business and has developed into an important and rapidly growing key area within De Gruyters….”

Streit um wissenschaftliche Publikationen – “Irgendwo muss Geld fließen – denn der Prozess kostet Geld”

From Google Translate: “Universities and scientific specialist publishers are arguing about access to scientific publications – the universities are becoming too expensive for their subscriptions. Hannfisch von Hindenburg from the publishing house Elsevier defended the money demands of the publishing houses in the DLF – but signaled willingness to talk to enable more open access.”

Checkliste „Open Access policies“: Analyse von Open Access policies öffentlicher Universitäten in Österreich | Bauer | Mitteilungen der Vereinigung Österreichischer Bibliothekarinnen und Bibliothekare

From Google’s English: “Summary: This checklist provides an overview of the Austrian universities and non-university research institutions Open Access Policies. Furthermore, the nine public universities Polices analyzed and thematically organized the respective Text building blocks. In the second part of the checklist are measures to promote.”