Greek OpenAIRE NOADs contribution to the development of institutional Open Science policies in Greece – OpenAIRE Blog

“The Library & Information Center of the University of Crete was the host of the 25th Panhellenic Academic Libraries Conference “Academic Libraries and Open Science” that was held on 10-11 October 2019 at the University of Crete (Rethymno). In addition, on Wednesday, October 9, an OpenAIRE pre-conference workshop took place titled “Workshop on Open Science Policies at Higher Education Institutions: From Theory to Practice”….

Elli focused on five basic areas: (a) Open Science: definition and benefits, (b) The European institutional framework and the recent developments, (c) The OpenAIRE role in Europe and in Greece, (d) Open Science in Greece: the present and the future, (e) Next steps.

The next presentation held from Iliana Araka (HEAL-Link/ OpenAIRE). Iliana spoke about the “Rectors’ Conference Declaration on Open Science in Universities, HEAL-Links’ and librarians’ role into the formation and implementation of open science policies”.

In other worlds, she tried to explain paragraph by paragraph the decision of the Rectors’ Council, which is the first formal Declaration on open access in Greek universities. Additionally, she attempted to link the meaning of “open access”, “open research data”, “citizen science” and “open science” to the role of the modern library….”

Greek OpenAIRE NOADs contribution to the development of institutional Open Science policies in Greece – OpenAIRE Blog

“The Library & Information Center of the University of Crete was the host of the 25th Panhellenic Academic Libraries Conference “Academic Libraries and Open Science” that was held on 10-11 October 2019 at the University of Crete (Rethymno). In addition, on Wednesday, October 9, an OpenAIRE pre-conference workshop took place titled “Workshop on Open Science Policies at Higher Education Institutions: From Theory to Practice”….

Elli focused on five basic areas: (a) Open Science: definition and benefits, (b) The European institutional framework and the recent developments, (c) The OpenAIRE role in Europe and in Greece, (d) Open Science in Greece: the present and the future, (e) Next steps.

The next presentation held from Iliana Araka (HEAL-Link/ OpenAIRE). Iliana spoke about the “Rectors’ Conference Declaration on Open Science in Universities, HEAL-Links’ and librarians’ role into the formation and implementation of open science policies”.

In other worlds, she tried to explain paragraph by paragraph the decision of the Rectors’ Council, which is the first formal Declaration on open access in Greek universities. Additionally, she attempted to link the meaning of “open access”, “open research data”, “citizen science” and “open science” to the role of the modern library….”

JMIR – Gimme My Damn Data (and Let Patients Help!): The #GimmeMyDamnData Manifesto | deBronkart | Journal of Medical Internet Research

Abstract:  Ten years ago, in 2009, “e-Patient Dave” deBronkart delivered an influential keynote speech at the Medicine 2.0 conference in Toronto, organized by the Journal of Medical Internet Research’s (JMIR’s) editor-in-chief Gunther Eysenbach, who themed the conference around the topics of participation, openness, collaboration, apomediation, and social networking to improve health care for the 21st century—with patient participation being a major component. Many see this as a defining event within the participatory medicine movement, perhaps the beginning of a social movement, similar to the women’s rights movement, with the title of Dave’s keynote “Gimme my damn data” becoming a rallying cry and hashtag for patients demanding more access to their electronic health records. On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of JMIR (and 10 years after the keynote), we are celebrating the impact of the keynote for the participatory medicine movement and #gimmemydamndata (also #GMDD) by publishing the transcript of these initial conversations as a manifesto of patients’ rights to access their data and their right to save their lives.

 

The Beijing Declaration on Research Data

Grand challenges related to the environment, human health, and sustainability confront science and society. Understanding and mitigating these challenges in a rapidly changing environment require data[1] to be FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) and as open as possible on a global basis. Scientific discovery must not be impeded unnecessarily by fragmented and closed systems, and the stewardship of research data should avoid defaulting to the traditional, proprietary approach of scholarly publishing. Therefore, the adoption of new policies and principles, coordinated and implemented globally, is necessary for research data and the associated infrastructures, tools, services, and practices. The time to act on the basis of solid policies for research data is now.

The Beijing Declaration on Research Data

Grand challenges related to the environment, human health, and sustainability confront science and society. Understanding and mitigating these challenges in a rapidly changing environment require data[1] to be FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) and as open as possible on a global basis. Scientific discovery must not be impeded unnecessarily by fragmented and closed systems, and the stewardship of research data should avoid defaulting to the traditional, proprietary approach of scholarly publishing. Therefore, the adoption of new policies and principles, coordinated and implemented globally, is necessary for research data and the associated infrastructures, tools, services, and practices. The time to act on the basis of solid policies for research data is now.

OpenGLAM

“The OpenGLAM initiative is currently working on a modern set of principles and values on Open Access for Cultural Heritage. We expect to draft a Declaration that outlines the rationales behind open access policy adoptions, acknowledges different cultural backgrounds, and addresses ethical and privacy considerations to help promote the adoption of open policies by a broader set of organizations around the world.

By February 2020 we will release a green paper focusing on the legal foundations of open access for cultural heritage, and examining some of the broader questions around copyright and open licensing, traditional knowledge, ethical and privacy concerns, and technical standards for open access. Following a consultation period, we plan to publish a final version of that paper and make the official launch of the Declaration on Open Access for Cultural Heritage by 2020. If you would like to get involved, please write to us at info [at] openglam.org….”

#NoFeeScience #MarchForBetterScience

From Google’s English: “Objective: This “manifesto” is intended, initially, to a public of scientists. Some recent moves, such as #MarchForScience or #NoFakeScience [1, 2], that have made a lot of noise in the media and social networks, have had the merit of highlighting how much we need not only trust, but also the cooperation of the general public in order to face the global crises that mark our time. However, if there is a scientific consensus that is lacking today, it is precisely the one that can affirm, without bad faith, that “knowledge is the heritage of humanity”. For that, it would first be necessary for this heritage to be entirely and freely accessible by everyone.

If you agree with this principle and are ready to support it, you are welcome to add your signature at the bottom of this manifesto. At this very moment when climate strike movements around the world insist that we do not have time to wait for the recalcitrant, we must act now, it is not the case for the open science: the moment to act to give citizens the confidence that we, scientists, need on their part, the moment finally to open science, it is also now! Let’s talk about this also in the media …”

A Human-Centric Digital Manifesto for Europe – Open Society Foundations

“Public money should be invested towards societal benefit wherever possible. In the case of research, making scientific and academic works freely available is of clear benefit for universities and public institutions. The former benefit from greater visibility for their work and their staff, as the outcome of their work can be improved and reused by similar institutions or by individual experts. The latter benefit from access to the work in which they have directly or indirectly invested.

At the same time, by requiring the use of open standards, open source code, open hardware and open data, the EU will be investing in improving its security, avoiding vendor lock-in, ensuring transparency as well as control of technologies, and allowing for cross-border collaboration within EU Member States’ institutions and with non-EU partners. This will strengthen innovation and better ensure the achievement of broader policy goals on data protection, privacy and security….”

Open Access Tipping Point (OATIP) Public Affirmation – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The following public affirmation was co-authored by library and faculty participants of the OATIP workshop.

On August 28-29 2019, library and faculty participants from 17 universities and consortia came together at the Open Access Tipping Point workshop in Washington DC to learn from one another, express our shared values, and pursue a more open and equitable scholarly communication ecosystem.

While our approaches and strategies may take different forms, we affirm the importance of using journal license negotiations to promote open access to our scholarship and to support sustainable business models, including the elimination of dual payments to publishers.

We will advocate broadly, and work with our stakeholders both locally and in existing consortia, to advance these common goals….”

Que faut-il faire pour que la science soit plus ouverte? (What needs to be done to make science more open?)

From Google’s English: 

“Open science is the practice of making research publications and data freely available. It takes advantage of the digital transition to develop open access to publications and, to the fullest extent possible, to research data.”