OPERAS Declaration on the Plan S Implementation Guidance – OPERAS

“The level of technical compliance is not the same for journals and platforms on the one hand, and for repositories on the other hand. While, according to the guidance on the implementation of Plan S, journals and publishing platforms should provide “machine readable” formats (no requirement in terms of standards), repositories should store the full text in “XML in JATS standard (or equivalent)”. As any XML, HTML or even plain text can be considered a machine readable format, the requirement for repositories appears to be much higher. In particular so, considering that most of them do not meet the criteria currently. The same holds also true for many publishing platforms and journals. Therefore, the criteria for technical compliance for journals, platforms and repositories should be aligned….

More work should be done, nonetheless, on non-APC Open Access journals (known as “Diamond”), of which, according to DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals), more exist compared to Gold journals (9173 against 3299), particularly in the Social Sciences and Humanities. cOAlition S should allow for funding mechanisms to support Diamond journals which otherwise could be tempted to move towards Gold APC models to be eligible to receive cOAlition S grants….”

Public Domain Manifesto

” The following principles are essential to preserve a meaningful understanding of the Public Domain and to ensure that the Public Domain continues to function in the technological environment of the networked information society. With regard to the structural Public Domain these are as follows:

  1. The Public Domain is the rule, copyright protection is the exception. Since copyright protection is granted only with respect to original forms of expression, the vast majority of data, information and ideas produced worldwide at any given time belongs to the Public Domain. In addition to information that is not eligible for protection, the Public Domain is enlarged every year by works whose term of protection expires. The combined application of the requirements for protection and the limited duration of the copyright protection contribute to the wealth of the Public Domain so as to ensure access to our shared culture and knowledge.
  2. Copyright protection should last only as long as necessary to achieve a reasonable compromise between protecting and rewarding the author for his intellectual labour and safeguarding the public interest in the dissemination of culture and knowledge. From neither the perspective of the author nor the general public do any valid arguments exist (whether historical, economic, social or otherwise) in support of an exceedingly long term of copyright protection. While the author should be able to reap the fruits of his intellectual labour, the general public should not be deprived for an overly long period of time of the benefits of freely using those works.
  3. What is in the Public Domain must remain in the Public Domain. Exclusive control over Public Domain works must not be reestablished by claiming exclusive rights in technical reproductions of the works, or using technical protection measures to limit access to technical reproductions of such works.
  4. The lawful user of a digital copy of a Public Domain work should be free to (re-)use, copy and modify such work. The Public Domain status of a work does not necessarily mean that it must be made accessible to the public. The owners of physical works that are in the Public Domain are free to restrict access to such works. However once access to a work has been granted then there ought not be legal restrictions on the re-use, modification or reproduction of these works.
  5. Contracts or technical protection measures that restrict access to and re-use of Public Domain works must not be enforced. The Public Domain status of a work guarantees the right to re-use, modify and reproduce. This also includes user prerogatives arising from exceptions and limitations, fair use and fair dealing, ensuring that these cannot be limited by contractual or technological means….”

Public Open Statements/public statement against author-facing charges.md · master · Publishing Reform / discussion · GitLab

“1. We hereby state our strong opposition to any implementation of scholarly publishing based on submission and publication fees charged to authors. This includes page charges for traditional subscription journals, and open access journals charging an author fee per article (APC). There must be no financial barriers to submission or publication placed in the way of authors of research articles. 

2. Our opposition to author fees is based on: 

i) the historically observed fact that the global system of research and scholarship works best when barriers to participation by authors and readers are as low as possible; ii) the principle of fairness to authors – joining the global conversation should not be limited by inability to pay, or lack of powerful sponsors who will pay, but should depend on the quality of the author’s research; iii) the fact that author fee waivers that take account of ability to pay are extremely difficult to implement, and commonly used waiver schemes introduce unfairness and waste of resources; iv) the clear incentive to publishers using such a model to maximize revenue by overstating their costs and accepting and publishing articles without sufficient selectivity or value being added. 

3. We do not support the payment/reimbursement of author fees by funding agencies, because this does nothing to control the level of such fees, and further privileges researchers already helped by funders. 

4. Instead, we strongly support the model of open access journals whose production costs are paid by consortial membership contributions transparently related to publishing costs but not directly linked to specific authors or articles (for example, Open Library of Humanities, Redalyc, SciPost). We call on all research funders to take immediate steps to support such organizations of journals. 

5. The above is consistent with and informed by the 4th Fair Open Access Principle….”

Leiden manifesto for research Metrics – Home

“Research evaluation has become routine and often relies on metrics. But it is increasingly driven by data and not by expert judgement. As a result, the procedures that were designed to increase the quality of research are now threatening to damage the scientific system. To support researchers and managers, five experts led by Diana Hicks, professor in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology, and Paul Wouters, director of CWTS at Leiden University, have proposed 10 principles for the measurement of research performance: the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics published as a comment in Nature….”

A manifesto for reproducible science | Wonkhe | Analysis

What can we do? A group of UK researchers recently published a Manifesto for Reproducible Sciencewhere we argue for the adoption of a range of measures to optimize key elements of the scientific process: methods, reporting and dissemination, reproducibility, evaluation and incentives. Crucially, most of the measures we propose require the engagement of funders, journals and institutions. However, while many funders and journals have begun to engage seriously with these issues – increasing the use of reporting checklists, and allowing the inclusion of methodology annexes on grants, for example – most institutions have been slow to do anything. And institutions control the strongest incentives – hiring and promotion.

We identified two broad areas where institutions could foster higher quality research – methods (e.g., by providing improved methodological training, and promoting collaboration and team science), and incentives (e.g., by rewarding open science and reproducible research practice). …”

The Colombo Statement: IDUAI 2018

“Having attended “The Asian Digital Revolution: Transforming the Digital Divide into a Digital Dividend through Universal Access”, a commemorative event held to celebrate the International Day for Universal Acces to Information (IDUAI) in Colombo on 28-29 September 2018:…

Considering the 2011 Strategy on UNESCO’s contribution to the promotion of Open Access (OA) to scientific information and research and taking into account specific needs in the countries of the South;…

The participants: …

Reaffirm the importance of empowering all citizens, especially young women and men and persons with disabilities, to develop a culture of openness and to become creators of content and innovation, including through access to information and quality education.

Reiterate the understanding of the Dakar Declaration on Open Access for the Global South, and state the necessity for establishing polycentric governance mechanisms for OA research and recommend that institutions and governments urgently collaborate to pilot and develop policies and enabling mechanisms to promote and publicize Open Scholarship and Open Science.

Call upon the governments to take firm steps and develop policies to mandate all the publicly funded research are available under Open Access; and also to earmark enough funding for necessary infrastructural and capacity enhancement.

Appreciate the Ljubljana Ministerial Statement and Open Educational Resources [OER] Action Plan 2017 which recognizes OER as a strategic opportunity to increase knowledge sharing and universal access to quality learning and teaching resources and call upon Governments and all relevant educational stakeholders, including civil society, to mainstream OER making them more broadly accessible including to persons with disabilities in support of achieving the Education 2030 Agenda.

Note the need to ensure institution-wide multi-sectoral training, attuned to people’s divergent and discrete needs, in particular those of disadvantaged groups and individuals, and designed to accustom and familiarize the community towards a more inclusive environment which can integrate the latest available technology (ODL, OER, FOSS, OA, etc.) into learning, teaching and training routines, applying the tenets of universal design for learning including UNESCO’s just published Competency Framework…

Recommend that OER be made accessible across media, including smart mobile devices and offline, in flexible and inclusive formats that support their effective and widest possible use, including by persons with disadvantages or disabilities, to learning, teaching and training, again in accordance with the tenets of relevant best practice….”

 

Aligning strategies to enable Open Access | Max-Planck-Gesellschaft

“The 14th Berlin Open Access Conference, hosted by the Max Planck Society and organized by the Max Planck Digital Library on behalf of the Open Access 2020 Initiative (oa2020.org), has just come to an end after two intense days with 170 participants from 37 countries around the world discussing where the research organizations and their library consortia stand in their negotiations with scholarly publishers in transitioning scholarly publishing to open access….

The conference brought to light strong consensus and alignment among the diverse international communities represented around the necessity of stepping up efforts to move away from the subscription-based system of scholarly publishing to open access-based business models. A major focus was placed on transformative agreements (eg “read and publish”), which were identified as perhaps the most viable instrument at the moment to accelerate the transition to open access. As it became clear from statements made by representatives from Japan, the United States, South Africa and others, that readiness to adopt this approach is now extending beyond Europe, where it originated, and is currently being adopted in several countries; in particular, this was emphasized in a bold statement from China, the nation with the largest share of research publications….

The message conveyed to the publishers was that the global research communities are committed to complete and immediate open access, to retaining author copyrights and to negotiating transformative agreements that are temporary, transitional, and cost-neutral as a mean to shift to full open access within just a few years with the expectation that cost savings in scholarly communication will follow as market forces take hold. The publishers were called upon to move towards complete and immediate open access according to these principles.

It also came out that there is a strong alignment between the approaches taken by OA2020, Plan S, the Jussieu Call and other approaches dedicated to drive more open access into the system of scholarly communication.”

Final Statement of the 14th Berlin Open Access Conference

“Participants from 37 nations and five continents, representing research performing and research funding institutions, libraries and government higher education associations and rectors’ conferences, associations of researchers and other open access initiatives gathered at the 14th Berlin Open Access Conference held 3-4 December 2018 in Berlin. They affirmed that there is a strong alignment among the approaches taken by OA2020Plan S, the Jussieu Call and others to facilitate a full and complete transition to open access. The statement that follows represents the strong consensus of all of those represented at the meeting.

We are all committed to authors retaining their copyrights,
We are all committed to complete and immediate open access,
We are all committed to accelerating the progress of open access through transformative agreements that are temporary and transitional, with a shift to full open access within a very few years. These agreements should, at least initially, be cost-neutral, with the expectation that economic adjustments will follow as the markets transform….”

Draft for the International Data Week Gaborone Statement-181107 – Google Docs

Google doc draft of International Data Week Gabarone statement.

“International Data Week explores the digital frontiers of global science and how governments, science systems, research institutions and researchers engage with developments that are transforming the world….

The conference explored how data can transform agriculture, education, health, and the response to health crises, Data can also contribute to social inclusion, and preservation of the environment and biodiversity.  Participants It examined the policy dimensions of Open Science and the technical implementation that enables data to be findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR). Furthermore, Participants drafted Indigenous data governance principles–CARE, collective benefit, authority and control, responsibility and accountability, and ethics (CARE)–that are intended to be complementary to the FAIR principles so that open data and open science consider data, people and purpose as well as data in their operations.

The value of data is enhanced by reuse.  Therefore, data should be as open as possible, as closed as necessary.  The global movement for Open Science is showing how benefits can be achieved: African researchers and research institutions should participate fully in these initiatives…..”

Here, but Not Evenly Distributed: Libraries, Innovation and the Right to Science « Library Policy and Advocacy Blog

A focus on sharing not just technology, but all forms of knowledge, is arguably missing from the UN 2030 Agenda. And there are questions – around expanding internet access, and finding sustainable models for Open Access. Yet the key elements of any future drive in this area are in place in the shape of libraries.

Clearly we are still some way from delivering the right to science, but the Universal Declaration reminds us that the effort is worth it….”