Montreal Statement | Sustainability in the Digital Age

“OPEN AND TRANSPARENT ACCESS TO DATA AND KNOWLEDGE CRITICAL TO ACHIEVING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIAL EQUITY

Colossal quantities of data are produced and made accessible as a result of the digital age. Nevertheless, much of the data most valuable for building a climate-safe and equitable world are either not available for public use or are simply not being collected. As AI is increasingly turning collected data into usable knowledge, steps that could ensure open access to this critical data and knowledge include:

The creation and support of multi-stakeholder, consensus-based processes to identify priority data needed in the public domain. This includes understanding:

What data, critical for environmental sustainability and social equity, already exists in private or public domains? Who is harvesting and providing such data, and who has access to them?

What critical data is missing and how can they be obtained?

What are the environmental and social costs of data collection, storage, and use?…

This entails developing standards—such as providing for data transparency, traceability, ownership, and anonymity—to ensure that data for public use is of the highest quality, and is widely accessible and usable….”

 

Montreal Statement | Sustainability in the Digital Age

“OPEN AND TRANSPARENT ACCESS TO DATA AND KNOWLEDGE CRITICAL TO ACHIEVING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIAL EQUITY

Colossal quantities of data are produced and made accessible as a result of the digital age. Nevertheless, much of the data most valuable for building a climate-safe and equitable world are either not available for public use or are simply not being collected. As AI is increasingly turning collected data into usable knowledge, steps that could ensure open access to this critical data and knowledge include:

The creation and support of multi-stakeholder, consensus-based processes to identify priority data needed in the public domain. This includes understanding:

What data, critical for environmental sustainability and social equity, already exists in private or public domains? Who is harvesting and providing such data, and who has access to them?

What critical data is missing and how can they be obtained?

What are the environmental and social costs of data collection, storage, and use?…

This entails developing standards—such as providing for data transparency, traceability, ownership, and anonymity—to ensure that data for public use is of the highest quality, and is widely accessible and usable….”

 

Announcing Launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age | FutureEarth

“Future Earth is pleased to announce the launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age. The collective statement from an international group of business, government, and science leaders highlights that we cannot achieve a climate-safe, sustainable, and equitable future without ensuring a secure, safe, and trusted digital world for all….

2. Ensure open and transparent access to data and knowledge critical to achieving sustainability and equity; …”

Announcing Launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age | FutureEarth

“Future Earth is pleased to announce the launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age. The collective statement from an international group of business, government, and science leaders highlights that we cannot achieve a climate-safe, sustainable, and equitable future without ensuring a secure, safe, and trusted digital world for all….

2. Ensure open and transparent access to data and knowledge critical to achieving sustainability and equity; …”

Passenger Pigeon Manifesto – A call to GLAMs – Google Docs

“A call to public GLAM institutions to liberate our cultural heritage. Illustrated with the cautionary tales of extinct animals and our lack of access to what remains of them….

We are supposed to learn from history yet we don’t have access to it. Historical photographs of extinct animals are among the most important artefacts to teach and inform about human impact on nature. But where to look when one wants to see all that is left of these beings? Where can I access all the extant photos of the thylacine or the passenger pigeon?

Historical photos are kept by archives, libraries, museums. Preservation, which is the goal of cultural institutions, means ensuring not only the existence of but the access to historical material. It is the opposite of owning: it’s sustainable sharing. Similarly, conservation is not capturing and caging but providing the conditions and freedom to live.

In reality, most historical photos are not freely available to the public – despite being in public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium size previews scattered in numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct.

The knowledge and efforts of these institutions are crucial in tending our cultural landscape but they cannot become prisons to our history. Instead of claiming ownership, their task is to provide unrestricted access and free use.

In reality, most historical photos are not freely available to the public – despite being in public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium size previews scattered in numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct….”

Underteckna deklarationen för öppen vetenskap och forskning 2020–2025 | Avoin tiede

“The Declaration for Open Science and Research is the common vision of the Finnish research community. According to the vision, open science and research should be part of the researchers’ everyday lives, and transparency should support both the impact of the various end products that the research results in and the quality of the research. The Finnish research community will also be an international pioneer in open science and research.

The path to realizing the vision is described in the mission of open science and research. The mission is to:

promote openness as a fundamental value in the entire research community’s activities;
strengthen the level of education and innovation in society and 
improve the quality of scientific and artistic research and the teaching materials based on it, and the smooth exchange and impact of research output throughout society, between researchers and research groups, between research areas, between research and education, between researchers and companies, the public sector and third sector and between researchers and community decision-makers as well as citizens. …”

#NoFeeScience #MarchForBetterScience

“[This is the English translation of a manifesto originally published for a Francophone audience. The text has been modified slightly to make it more relevant to a global audience. The original text can be read here: https://t.co/CBVuz4Pynf?amp=1 ]

Objective: This “manifesto” is addressed, first and foremost, to fellow scientists and researchers, our peers and colleagues. Certain recent movements, such as #MarchForScience and #NoFakeScience [1, 2], both widely shared and discussed in traditional and social media, have the merit of emphasizing how much we need, not only the trust, but also the cooperation of the general public in order to face the global crises that are defining this present moment in history. However, these movements fail to mention one scientific consensus which the scientific community still cannot, in good conscience, be said to share: the credo that “knowledge belongs to humanity”. For this idea to reach consensus status, it would first be necessary for scientific knowledge to be made fully and freely accessible to one and all.

If you agree with this principle and are prepared to support it, you are invited to add your signature at the bottom of this manifesto. At this precise moment in time, as climate strike movements around the globe are hammering home the fact that we don’t have time to wait for resisters and deniers, that it’s necessary we act now, the same urgency applies to the open science movement: the time to act by reciprocating the trust which we, scientists, require of the general public, the moment to finally open science, is also now! And maybe this idea needs to be hammered home in the media too… ”

Digital shift manifesto – Research Libraries UK

“Digital technologies heavily impact society, higher education and the workplace. As information service providers, research libraries are particularly affected by these changes. This manifesto outlines what actions the community of Research Libraries in the UK (RLUK) proposes to undertake to be ready for the next decade of the Digital Shift, building on work already underway across the sector. It is an open invitation to other organisations and communities, whether from the library sector or not, to work with us. Research libraries are strongly positioned to lead and influence the effective exploitation of digital technologies within their institutions, and we are keen to unlock the potential which the Digital Shift offers.

Twenty years ago, print journals and card catalogues were still featured in research libraries. Today, scholarly journals are (largely) electronic, with discovery and access often bypassing library catalogues. Open science and digital research are actively supported in many libraries. Twenty years from now, subscription-funded access may be the exception and library catalogues could well have ceased to exist as distinct entities as research will be built on new workflows and platforms. To prepare for these developments, research libraries need a programme of change for the coming decade….”

The Sorbonne Declaration on Research Data Rights

“Indeed, the Sorbonne Declaration echoes other open scholarship policies in calling for integrating data management into standard research workflows and calls for the development of infrastructure and funding to enable it. Quoting researchers from Go8 institutions, Ross notes that, as a statement developed by influential research organizations around the world, the Declaration has the potential to lead to significant change in countries with “fragmented” open data policies, as well as those with more developed ones (2020a). He cites Canada’s Digital Research Infrastructure Strategy as an example of a well-developed policy and suggests that the Declaration is an important policy to keep in mind as the details of Canada’s DRI funding are decided. Canada’s recently released Roadmap for Open Science also emphasizes the need for data to be “open by design and by default,” and to follow FAIR principles (Government of Canada 2020).

As discussed in “The Review, Promotion, and Tenure Project at the ScholCommLab,” institutional policies that do not recognize or reward open scholarship are widely recognized as a barrier to cultural change. In acknowledgement of this, and as a way of encouraging a necessary cultural shift, the Declaration also includes a commitment to working towards changing these policies….”