Passenger Pigeon Manifesto

“We are supposed to learn from history, yet we don’t have access to it. Historical photographs of extinct animals are among the most important artefacts to teach and inform about human impact on nature. But where to look when one wants to see all that is left of these beings? Where can I access all the extant photos of the thylacine or the passenger pigeon? History books use photos to help us relate to narratives and see a shared reality. But how can we look through our own communities’ photographic heritage, share it with each other and use it for research and education?

Historical photos are kept by archives, libraries, museums and other cultural institutions. Preservation, which is the goal of cultural institutions, means ensuring not only the existence of but the access to historical materials. It is the opposite of owning: it’s sustainable sharing. Similarly, conservation is not capturing and caging but ensuring the conditions and freedom to live.

Even though most of our tangible cultural heritage has not been digitised yet, a process greatly hindered by the lack of resources for professionals, we could already have much to look at online. In reality, a significant portion of already digitised historical photos is not available freely to the public – despite being in the public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium sized previews scattered throughout numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct.

The knowledge and efforts of these institutions are crucial in tending our cultural landscape but they cannot become prisons to our history. Instead of claiming ownership, their task is to provide unrestricted access and free use. Cultural heritage should not be accessible only for those who can afford paying for it….”

Labour of Love: An Open Access Manifesto for Freedom, Integrity, and Creativity in the Humanities and Interpretive Social Sciences · Commonplace

“The undersigned are a group of scholar-publishers based in the humanities and social sciences who are questioning the fairness and scientific tenability of a system of scholarly communication dominated by large commercial publishers. With this manifesto we wish to repoliticise Open Access to challenge existing rapacious practices in academic publishing—namely, often invisible and unremunerated labour, toxic hierarchies of academic prestige, and a bureaucratic ethos that stifles experimentation—and to bear witness to the indifference they are predicated upon….

What can we, as researchers, do? We can reinvigorate ties with journals published by scholarly societies. We can act creatively to reclaim ownership over the free labour that we mindlessly offer to commercial actors. We can conjure digital infrastructures (think of platforms from OJS to Janeway, PubPub, and beyond) that operate in the service of the knowledge commons. Scholar-led OA publishing has the power to bypass gatekeeping institutions, bridge the knowledge gap produced by commercially driven censorship, and provide support to homegrown digital activism in countries where access to scholarship is restricted. All of this, without neglecting scholarly institutions such as a constructive peer review process or other forms of consensus-building and quality assurance proper to the humanities and interpretive social sciences….”

Manifesto for EU COVID-19 Research | European Commission

“By endorsing the manifesto you commit to

Make the generated results, whether tangible or intangible, public and accessible without delay, for instance on the Horizon Results Platform, on an existing IP sharing platform, or through an existing patent pool.

Make scientific papers and research data available in open access without delay and following the FAIR principles via preprint servers or public repositories, with rights for others to build upon the publications and data and with access to the tools needed for their validation.In particular, make COVID-19 research data available through the European COVID-19 Data Platform

Where possible, grant for a limited time, non-exclusive royalty free licences on the intellectual property resulting from EU-funded research. These non-exclusive royalty free licenses shall be given in exchange for the licensees’ commitment to rapidly and broadly distribute the resulting products and services under fair and reasonable conditions to prevent, diagnose, treat and contain COVID-19.

These non-exclusive royalty free licenses shall be given in exchange for the licensees’ commitment to rapidly and broadly distribute the resulting products and services under fair and reasonable conditions to prevent, diagnose, treat and contain Covid-19….”

Manifiesto bibliotecario por la Ciencia Abierta en América Latina | by Juan José Calderón Amador * ? ? | #T5eS? emergencia y esclavitud digital | Aug, 2020 | Medium

From Google’s English:  The Latin American librarians gathered in Bogotá in the framework of OpenCon LatAm 2019, in accordance with the Declaration of Panama on Open, Reproducible and Replicable Science (2018), “we want to make public our confidence in the role of education, culture and science , as the engine of democracy, freedom and social justice in the current historical moment ”. We want more science, we want it for everyone and we want it open.

We declare that:

Our mission is to ensure the right to information and knowledge as a fundamental right, indispensable for education, culture and science.
We recognize knowledge as a common good and we see open science as an opportunity for the development of a sustainable model that ensures the creation, management and communication of data, information and knowledge for all people in society, in all its diversity, without class distinction or conditions.
We are key actors to promote and facilitate cultural change, We assume the commitment to accompany the transition processes and social mobilization, promoting the appropriation of technologies, tools, methodologies, use, generation and opening of knowledge in Latin America and the Caribbean

Therefore, we are committed to developing and supporting the following actions in agreed and collaborative agendas between professionals, citizens, institutions and countries….”

Montreal Statement | Sustainability in the Digital Age

“OPEN AND TRANSPARENT ACCESS TO DATA AND KNOWLEDGE CRITICAL TO ACHIEVING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIAL EQUITY

Colossal quantities of data are produced and made accessible as a result of the digital age. Nevertheless, much of the data most valuable for building a climate-safe and equitable world are either not available for public use or are simply not being collected. As AI is increasingly turning collected data into usable knowledge, steps that could ensure open access to this critical data and knowledge include:

The creation and support of multi-stakeholder, consensus-based processes to identify priority data needed in the public domain. This includes understanding:

What data, critical for environmental sustainability and social equity, already exists in private or public domains? Who is harvesting and providing such data, and who has access to them?

What critical data is missing and how can they be obtained?

What are the environmental and social costs of data collection, storage, and use?…

This entails developing standards—such as providing for data transparency, traceability, ownership, and anonymity—to ensure that data for public use is of the highest quality, and is widely accessible and usable….”

 

Montreal Statement | Sustainability in the Digital Age

“OPEN AND TRANSPARENT ACCESS TO DATA AND KNOWLEDGE CRITICAL TO ACHIEVING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIAL EQUITY

Colossal quantities of data are produced and made accessible as a result of the digital age. Nevertheless, much of the data most valuable for building a climate-safe and equitable world are either not available for public use or are simply not being collected. As AI is increasingly turning collected data into usable knowledge, steps that could ensure open access to this critical data and knowledge include:

The creation and support of multi-stakeholder, consensus-based processes to identify priority data needed in the public domain. This includes understanding:

What data, critical for environmental sustainability and social equity, already exists in private or public domains? Who is harvesting and providing such data, and who has access to them?

What critical data is missing and how can they be obtained?

What are the environmental and social costs of data collection, storage, and use?…

This entails developing standards—such as providing for data transparency, traceability, ownership, and anonymity—to ensure that data for public use is of the highest quality, and is widely accessible and usable….”

 

Announcing Launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age | FutureEarth

“Future Earth is pleased to announce the launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age. The collective statement from an international group of business, government, and science leaders highlights that we cannot achieve a climate-safe, sustainable, and equitable future without ensuring a secure, safe, and trusted digital world for all….

2. Ensure open and transparent access to data and knowledge critical to achieving sustainability and equity; …”

Announcing Launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age | FutureEarth

“Future Earth is pleased to announce the launch of the Montreal Statement on Sustainability in the Digital Age. The collective statement from an international group of business, government, and science leaders highlights that we cannot achieve a climate-safe, sustainable, and equitable future without ensuring a secure, safe, and trusted digital world for all….

2. Ensure open and transparent access to data and knowledge critical to achieving sustainability and equity; …”

Passenger Pigeon Manifesto – A call to GLAMs – Google Docs

“A call to public GLAM institutions to liberate our cultural heritage. Illustrated with the cautionary tales of extinct animals and our lack of access to what remains of them….

We are supposed to learn from history yet we don’t have access to it. Historical photographs of extinct animals are among the most important artefacts to teach and inform about human impact on nature. But where to look when one wants to see all that is left of these beings? Where can I access all the extant photos of the thylacine or the passenger pigeon?

Historical photos are kept by archives, libraries, museums. Preservation, which is the goal of cultural institutions, means ensuring not only the existence of but the access to historical material. It is the opposite of owning: it’s sustainable sharing. Similarly, conservation is not capturing and caging but providing the conditions and freedom to live.

In reality, most historical photos are not freely available to the public – despite being in public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium size previews scattered in numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct.

The knowledge and efforts of these institutions are crucial in tending our cultural landscape but they cannot become prisons to our history. Instead of claiming ownership, their task is to provide unrestricted access and free use.

In reality, most historical photos are not freely available to the public – despite being in public domain. We might be able to see thumbnails or medium size previews scattered in numerous online catalogs but most of the time we don’t get to see them in full quality and detail. In general, they are hidden, the memory of their existence slowly going extinct….”