Even More Impacts of the National Emergency Library and Controlled Digital Lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“This is the third part in a series of testimonials from patrons who used the National Emergency Library and continue to use controlled digital lending to borrow books from our library (you can read the previous posts here and here). If you’d like to share your story of how you used the NEL while it was open, or how you are still using our lending library today, please leave a testimonial….”

Even More Impacts of the National Emergency Library and Controlled Digital Lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“This is the third part in a series of testimonials from patrons who used the National Emergency Library and continue to use controlled digital lending to borrow books from our library (you can read the previous posts here and here). If you’d like to share your story of how you used the NEL while it was open, or how you are still using our lending library today, please leave a testimonial….”

How open science creates new knowledge – Russell T. Warne

“During the 2010s, I gradually adopted open science practices. With each study I started, I began to take more and more steps to make my research transparent. I started uploading my data, documenting analysis procedures, pre-registering my work, and taking other steps to ensure my research was transparent. After adding components of open science to my work, I finally decided in fall 2017 that I would conduct a fully open science project. My only regret was that I didn’t fully embrace open science earlier….

This article is the result of the first fully open science study of my career, though I had adopted pieces of open science beforehand. Here is what I learned from this study: …”

Sharing Experiences of Journal Cancellations on a Rapid Timeline – SPARC

“In discussions with the SPARC Journal Negotiation Community of Practice, many institutions have discussed needing to prepare for cancellations on a rapid timeline. On June 18, SPARC provided a forum for librarians who recently led their institutions through a fast-tracked Big Deal cancellation to share how they navigated the process. Building on our Big Deal cancellation debrief in May, this event focused on how the process of preparing for and executing a cancellation differs when the timeline needs to be compressed to a few months.

The webinar was moderated by Jaclyn McLean of the University of Saskatchewan and featured Megan Heady from West Virginia University and Kristin Henrich from the University of Idaho.

Budget cuts are forcing many to rethink their contracts with publishers and, in some cases, pivot quickly. Both West Virginia University and the University of Idaho recently had to react to state-imposed budget reductions and prepare for a new way of operating. In the wake of COVID-19, many institutions anticipate financial pressures that could result in accelerated efforts to end their Big Deals – a process that may be complicated by remote work….”

More Impacts of the National Emergency Library – Internet Archive Blogs

“Following our previous post, we have continued to receive messages about the impact of the National Emergency Library before it closed last week. If you’d like to share your story of how you used the NEL, please leave a testimonial.

The following statements are condensed from testimonials sent to the Internet Archive:…”

Lettre de la science ouverte (The beautiful stories of open science)

From Google’s English: 

“Because openness is not a utopia, nor a bunch of experts, but an essential quality of science that bears fruit on a daily basis, we wanted to show through these stories how open science benefits by its values and its operating model for knowledge and society.

We offer context articles to understand the challenges of opening up and sharing science, what obstacles it raises in accessing knowledge, what conception of research it carries. (…) ”

Impacts of the temporary National Emergency Library and controlled digital lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“Our team of librarians launched the NEL on March 24 to help those who were disconnected from their physical libraries, and the feedback our team received has been overwhelming. Almost immediately after launch, we started receiving messages from teachers, librarians, and parents who were delighted to find needed books after many schools and libraries closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, we heard from researchers and educators who found texts for their coursework and research. Feedback continues to this day, indicating that the NEL has provided a necessary service for digital learners.

As we close the NEL, we are proud of our work and how it has helped. We gathered some of the most impactful statements to show how the NEL has been used and the impact it has made while our schools and libraries are closed. We are excited that the needs of our patrons will continue to be met through traditional controlled digital lending….”

Impacts of the temporary National Emergency Library and controlled digital lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“Our team of librarians launched the NEL on March 24 to help those who were disconnected from their physical libraries, and the feedback our team received has been overwhelming. Almost immediately after launch, we started receiving messages from teachers, librarians, and parents who were delighted to find needed books after many schools and libraries closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, we heard from researchers and educators who found texts for their coursework and research. Feedback continues to this day, indicating that the NEL has provided a necessary service for digital learners.

As we close the NEL, we are proud of our work and how it has helped. We gathered some of the most impactful statements to show how the NEL has been used and the impact it has made while our schools and libraries are closed. We are excited that the needs of our patrons will continue to be met through traditional controlled digital lending….”

Welcome! · The Coronarchive · coronarchiv

“The coronarchiv is a freely accessible, open online portal that welcomes anyone’s contribution. Its purpose is to collect, archive, contextualize and exhibit personal memories and memorabilia from the time of the coronavirus pandemic. The archive can include anything that is available in a digital or digitizable format: texts (journals, letters, emails, poems, newspaper and magazine articles, shopping lists, reports, signs, warnings, regulations), photographs, drawings, illustrations, videos, chats, social media posts, voice messages, songs, lectures and anything else that is relevant.”