Danes step away from patenting in favour of ‘open science’

Denmark’s top-ranked higher education institution is to shift away from patenting research conducted in partnership with the private sector to pursue an open science model.

Aarhus University’s new initiative, called Open Science, does not allow either the university or the companies involved to patent any discoveries made during the research process and, at the end, the results are disclosed to everyone – even other firms – in what it calls a “patent-free playground”.

Finding the public’s lost faith in science | The Mancunion

“Amitava Banerjee, honorary consultant cardiologist at the Farr Institute of Health Informatics Research, University College London, believes that open discussion is the way to communicate science’s use to the public.

She reflects on her experience at a Denmark viva voce event, which was open to the public, allowing questions and discussion with non-scientists and scientists alike. Banerjee highlights that ‘open science’ does not just relate to its methods and data but “also requires open discussion of the ways in which data are used, interpreted and ultimately translated for use in society.” …”

A draft open-access mandate for Denmark. The Danish Agency for Science,…

The Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation just released a draft open-access mandate for publicly-funded research in Denmark. It’s a green policy (following the EU and US rather than the UK) and make use of rights retention (following the Wellcome Trust, NIH, and Harvard). 

I called it a policy for publicly-funded research, but it aspires to go further: “To create free access for all citizens, researchers and companies to all research articles from Danish research institutions financed by public authorities and/or private foundations.”
It doesn’t yet include details that matter to OA specialists, e.g. timing of deposits, embargoes, open licensing, and application to data. But I imagine that these details will come in due time. Meanwhile the Ministry has signaled its commitment to open access and is open to comments.

Denmark´s National Strategy for Open Access

“The gains for Danish companies, Danish research and Danish society from free access – Open Access – to research findings are numerous. With increased accessibility to scientific articles on the Internet for all, we will achieve much more effective knowledge sharing among researchers, research institutions and companies. Open Access will result in new and improved research opportunities – especially with regard to inter-disciplinary research – and improve access to research-based 

knowledge for companies and others, thereby contributing to ensuring that stateof-the-art research is put to use more swiftly to create innovation and growth in society….

A draft open-access mandate for Denmark.

The Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation just released a draft open-access mandate for publicly-funded research in Denmark. It’s a green policy (following the EU and US rather than the UK) and make use of rights retention (following the Wellcome Trust, NIH, and Harvard). 

I called it a policy for publicly-funded research, but it aspires to go further: “To create free access for all citizens, researchers and companies to all research articles from Danish research institutions financed by public authorities and/or private foundations.”
It doesn’t yet include details that matter to OA specialists, e.g. timing of deposits, embargoes, open licensing, and application to data. But I imagine that these details will come in due time. Meanwhile the Ministry has signaled its commitment to open access and is open to comments.

Alle skal have gratis adgang til forskningsresultater

From Google’s English: “A large part of the researchers’ scientific articles are now hidden behind pay walls, so it requires a subscription or a tax each time you want to read a research article. That education and research minister Sofie Carsten Nielsen now, do away with and will be a new national strategy to ensure free digital access to scholarly articles in the future….Sofie Carsten Nielsen has set up a national steering committee for Open Access, which will be responsible for coordinating the implementation of the strategy. The steering group comprises, among others, representatives of universities, libraries, and public and private foundations….”

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fing.dk%2Fartikel%2Fregeringen-alle-danske-forskningsartikler-skal-vaere-frit-tilgaengelige-169271

Regeringen: Alle danske forskningsartikler skal være frit tilgængelige

From Google’s English:  “By 2022, all citizens have full and free access to all scientific papers describing the results of publicly financed research….Already in 2017, 80 percent of all scientific articles from Danish research institutions be free from digital online archives. From 2022, it should apply to all Danish research articles. That is the objective of a new national strategy for open access to education and research minister Sofie Carsten Nielsen (R) has just presented….Now a steering committee consisting of 16 representatives from universities, foundations and libraries so in the process of finding out how the objectives are met….The strategy provides for two different types of open access, which is called the golden and green model….”

http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fing.dk%2Fartikel%2Fregeringen-alle-danske-forskningsartikler-skal-vaere-frit-tilgaengelige-169271