Open access journal publishing in the Nordic countries

Abstract:  The number of open access (OA) journals and their share of all scholarly journals are usually estimated based on indexing in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). DOAJ’s coverage of OA journals from different regions of the world is, however, far from complete, particularly of journals publishing in languages other than English. Using alternative data sources for identification and manual verification, 437 scholarly OA journals published in the five Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) were identified, and some key characteristics were studied. Of these, only 184 were indexed in DOAJ. A vast majority of the journals was published by scholarly societies or universities. Social sciences and humanities dominated as topics, and few journals charge authors. National or university-specific OJS portals have played a major role in enabling OA publishing. Around a third of the Nordic scholarly journals are currently OA.

Being a deliberate prey of a predator: Researchers’ thoughts after having published in predatory journal

“The literature claims that mainly researchers from low-ranked universities in developing countries publish in predatory journals. We decided to challenge this claim using the University of Southern Denmark as a case. We ran the Beall’s List against our research registration database and identified 31 possibly predatory publications from a set of 6,851 publications within 2015-2016. A qualitative research interview revealed that experienced researchers from the developed world publish in predatory journals mainly for the same reasons as do researchers from developing countries: lack of awareness, speed and ease of the publication process, and a chance to get elsewhere rejected work published. However, our findings indicate that the Open Access potential and a larger readership outreach were also motives for publishing in open access journals with quick acceptance rates. …”

Europæiske universiteter sender officiel klage til Margrethe Vestager | Videnskab.dk

From Google’s English: “Danish Universities have together with universities from all over Europe just sent a letter of formal notice to the European Commission. The complaint is addressed to Commissioner Margrethe Vestager.

It’s about universities paying enormous amounts of money to a few publishers every year to access scientific articles that their own researchers have contributed to writing …

… Which would answer if a farmer had to pay a high price for a carton of milk that he had milked from his own cows and delivered to the dairy company.

With the complaint, the universities now put their foot down to the monopoly-like conditions which, in their opinion, distort the market….”

Exploring possibilities to use bibliometric data to monitor Gold open access publishing at the national level – van Leeuwen – – Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This article1 describes the possibilities to analyze open access (OA) publishing in the Netherlands in an international comparative way. OA publishing is now actively stimulated by Dutch science policy, similar to the United Kingdom. We conducted a bibliometric baseline measurement to assess the current situation, to be able to measure developments over time. We collected data from various sources, and for three different smaller European countries (the Netherlands, Denmark, and Switzerland). Not all of the analyses for this baseline measurement are included here. The analysis presented in this article focuses on the various ways OA can be defined using the Web of Science, limiting the analysis mainly to Gold OA. From the data we collected we can conclude that the way OA is currently registered in various electronic bibliographic databases is quite unclear, and various methods applied deliver results that are different, although the impact scores derived from the data point in the same direction.

Exploring possibilities to use bibliometric data to monitor Gold open access publishing at the national level – van Leeuwen – – Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This article1 describes the possibilities to analyze open access (OA) publishing in the Netherlands in an international comparative way. OA publishing is now actively stimulated by Dutch science policy, similar to the United Kingdom. We conducted a bibliometric baseline measurement to assess the current situation, to be able to measure developments over time. We collected data from various sources, and for three different smaller European countries (the Netherlands, Denmark, and Switzerland). Not all of the analyses for this baseline measurement are included here. The analysis presented in this article focuses on the various ways OA can be defined using the Web of Science, limiting the analysis mainly to Gold OA. From the data we collected we can conclude that the way OA is currently registered in various electronic bibliographic databases is quite unclear, and various methods applied deliver results that are different, although the impact scores derived from the data point in the same direction.

YERUN Statement on Open Science | investigación + biblioteca [I+B]

Google English: “The network of young European research universities YERUN (Young European Research Universities Network) has just published YERUN Statement on Open Science

The YERUN network is constituted by the following universities: Bremen, Konstanz and Ulm (Germany); Antwerpen (Belgium); Southern Denmark (Denmark); Autonomous University of Barcelona, Autonomous University of Madrid, Carlos III of Madrid and Pompeu Fabra (Spain); Eastern Finland (Finland); Paris Dauphine (France); Dublin City University (Ireland); University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy); Maastricht (The Netherlands); New Lisbon (Portugal); Brunel and Essex (United Kingdom); Linköping (Sweden)….”

Aarhus University and industry open patent-free playground

“Along with a number of leading Danish industrial companies, Aarhus University has opted out of the rat race in a new collaboration on industrially relevant basic research. Researchers and companies from all over Denmark publish all their results and data on the innovative Open Science platform, where the information is available free of charge to everyone interested….

The Open Science platform is thus the source of a number of paradigm shifts. It not only breaks away from the focus of universities on patenting their research discoveries, but also constitutes a conscious rebellion against the business models used by scientific journals….”

The Magic That Happens When Designers Get Open Access to Art – Shapeways Magazine

“Earlier this year we announced a unique design partnership with the National Gallery of Denmark (known to those in the know as the SMK). The SMK is a leader in the OpenGLAM (Open Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) movement and has made a huge amount of its art collection — pieces old enough to be in the public domain — available to the public without copyright restrictions. We partnered with the SMK to invite the Shapeways design community to create new pieces of jewelry based on six artworks selected by SMK curators. One winner and four runners up would be featured in the SMK itself, and other entries would be featured in SMK’s online shop.”