Cita Press Project and Editorial Coordinator | Educopia Institute

“Cita Press: Getting Fit project, a two-year partnership between the Educopia Institute and Cita Press, and generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to build capacity to support the growth and sustainability of Cita, an award-winning, open access, independent press that specializes in carefully designed public-domain texts written by women in free, contemporary editions for print and web…. 

This part-time, 30hr/week, position will be responsible for project coordination and daily management of project activities for the Cita Press: Getting Fit project. In addition to overall project coordination, this position will be responsible for editing English language texts as well as writing press releases, newsletter text, answering emails, and drafting social media posts in Spanish. Candidates that do not have writing proficiency in Spanish will be considered, however, all candidates selected for an interview must demonstrate the ability to communicate clearly and succinctly to a broad audience in English….”

New Steering Group sets direction for the second phase of the Scientific Publishing project – International Science Council

“Following the successful first phase of the project, which involved extensive consultations with the global scientific community as represented by ISC Members, and resulted in the ISC Report “Opening the record of science”, the ISC is stepping into the next phase under the guidance of the Steering Group. …”

Science family journals’ move to new online platform will enhance user experience | EurekAlert! Science News

To make all content across the Science family of journals more integrated, discoverable, and visually compelling for the reader, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the Science family of journals, will move its full suite of online content to Atypon’s online publishing platform, Literatum, in the summer of 2021.

Collaboration between research institutes and large and small publishers for publishing open access journals

Abstract:  Research institutes frequently collaborate with for-profit publishers for the publication of open access journals. This study uses a structural break test to examine the effects of the collaboration between research institutes and large and small for-profit publishers for the publication of 15 gold open access journals on the journals’ internationality and academic influence. The results reveal an improvement in the internationality and academic influence for most of the journals following the collaboration. Additionally, the scale and persistence of the effects are not dependent on the size of the publisher. The findings indicate that large publishers do not have any advantage over small publishers in publishing journals for research institutes. This implies that small publishers can compete with large ones in publishing official journals on behalf of research institutes. However, as collaboration with research institutes strengthens the large publishers’ presence in the open access journal market, it is necessary to monitor their activities, including large publishers’ acquisitions of small ones.

 

There’s big problems with the market for academic ebooks | Wonkhe

For Rachel Bickley, market pressure alone cannot solve the problems in the market for academic ebooks.

In the time since a small group of academic librarians launched the #ebooksos campaign with an Open Letter asking for an investigation into the academic ebook publishing industry, we have faced some questioning of our actions.

In spite of the letter having attracted, at the time of writing, signatures from over 3800 librarians, lecturers, students, heads of services, university senior managers and two vice chancellors, indicating that the cost and availability of ebooks is a significant concern across the sector, there have still been suggestions that perhaps we could sit down and discuss the issues with the publishers instead.

However, these issues are not new. The pandemic has brought the lack of availability of ebooks for institutional access, and the astronomical prices and restrictive licences under which those which are available can be procured, into sharp focus, but librarians have been dealing with this situation for a long time. Dialogue with publishers has been attempted, but it went nowhere useful. The investigation route was not a knee-jerk reaction to being unable to obtain the resources that we need for our students; it was the only option that those of us who set up the campaign could see remaining.

[…]

Gates Open Research – A summary of year four -Gates Open Research Blog

“We are pleased that more authors are choosing to publish with us, hosting the work of 2000 published authors, a third of whom have published at least twice.  Since launch, we have published 291 articles and 846 peer review reports, which are all assigned a DOI.

Research Articles remain our most popular peer reviewed article type, representing 48% of the published work. We’ve seen a rise in other article types, publishing more Open Letters and Study Protocols, at 23% and 15% respectively. We see the value in non-traditional article types, and this increase shows how researchers can benefit from the flexibility of communicating research beyond the standard research article, which isn’t necessarily the best or most appropriate format to convey research. Representing a smaller proportion but no less important are Method Articles, Software Tools and Research Notes at 5%, 4% and 2% respectively….”

OA Publishing Tools and Systems: 3 things you need to consider

“If you’re working with a scholarly organization or group of researchers to run an academic-led open access (OA) journal, you’re likely approaching all areas of journal management with the same core question in mind: How can we maximize our limited time and resources to keep improving our journal and expanding its reach? In order to meet the needs of readers and grow your journal, you need to be able to produce modern articles on a budget and with limited editorial resources.

Ultimately, the success of your OA journal will depend on the publishing tools and systems you leverage to maximize your efforts. Your journal team should seek tools and services that you can easily manage and that will enable you to keep up with the evolving digital publishing landscape.

There are certain considerations OA journal teams should keep in mind when choosing which peer review and publishing tools and systems to use. In this post, we outline 3 things to consider….”