A Grand-Challenges Based Research Agenda for Scholarly Communication and Information Science

“A global and multidisciplinary community of stakeholders came together in March 2018 to identify, scope, and prioritize a common vision for specific grand research challenges related to information science and scholarly communications. The participants were both traditional domain researchers and those who are aiming to democratize scholarship. An explicit aim of the summit was to identify research needs related to barriers in the development of scalable, interoperating, socially beneficial, and equitable systems for scholarly information; and to explore the development of non-market approaches to governing the scholarly ecosystem….”

 

Apply for a Certificate in OER Librarianship | Open Textbook Network

“The Open Textbook Network is now accepting applications for an inaugural cohort of librarians to be certified in OER Librarianship. Applicants should be, or anticipate becoming, newly responsible for building open education programs at their institutions and seek formal training, a community of peers, and expert mentors in order to build sustainable, collaborative, and effective open education programs on their campuses. Librarians who successfully complete the full program will receive a Certificate in OER Librarianship from the Open Textbook Network….”

Every Man His Book? An Introduction to Open Access in the Arts on JSTOR

Abstract:  This article provides an overview of open access publishing and its emergence in the arts. Open access scholarship, which is online, free for users to access, and free of most licensing restrictions, has enjoyed numerous successes in the sciences and is gaining widespread attention in the humanities and social sciences. Its presence in the arts, however, has been marginal. The author examines the various reasons for the problematic reception of open access publishing in image-rich disciplines like art history, highlights notable open access projects, and explores their potential impact on art librarianship.

How green is our valley?: five-year study of selected LIS journals from Taylor & Francis for green deposit of articles

Abstract:  This study reviews content from five different library and information science journals: Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian, Collection Management, College & Undergraduate Libraries, Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship and Journal of Library Administration over a five-year period from 2012–2016 to investigate the green deposit rate. Starting in 2011, Taylor & Francis, the publisher of these journals, waived the green deposit embargo for library and information science, heritage and archival content, which allows for immediate deposit of articles in these fields. The review looks at research articles and standing columns over the five years from these five journals to see if any articles were retrieved using the OA Button or through institutional repositories. Results indicate that less than a quarter of writers have chosen to make a green deposit of their articles in local or subject repositories. The discussion outlines some best practices to be undertaken by librarians, editors and Taylor & Francis to make this program more successful.

Scholarly Communication Librarian (Houghton Library) Job Opening in Cambridge, Massachusetts – ALA JobLIST | Jobs in Library & Information Science & Technology

“Harvard University’s Administrative Fellowship Program is one of the cornerstones of our diversity and inclusion efforts. We seek to attract talented professionals, and in particular members of historically underrepresented groups, to promote leadership opportunities and careers in higher education. The University encourages applications from individuals from diverse backgrounds and others who may contribute to the diversity of Harvard’s leadership. To this end, the Administrative Fellowship Program offers a twelve-month talent management experience complemented by a professional development program. Please visit the program’s website [https://hr.harvard.edu/administrative-fellows-program] for more details.

SUMMARY

Houghton Library is pleased to offer a two-year Harvard Library Diversity Fellowship to immerse a rising leader in the library and archives profession in a wide variety of activities related to the management of a world class repository of rare books, manuscripts, archives, and other rare and unique library materials. Over the course of the two years, the Fellow will be exposed to and make contributions to the major functions of the library including scholarly communication, public programs, researcher services, and other areas as opportunities present themselves. The Fellow will also have the opportunity to meet and work with curators, librarians and archivists in other libraries that comprise the Arts and Special Collections of the Harvard College.

A signature project will be core to the Fellow’s experience. The incumbent will primarily work with the editorial team for the Harvard Library Bulletin (HLB), a peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by Houghton Library on behalf of Harvard Library. This position will allow the Fellow to develop expertise in scholarly communication, an area of rising emphasis in librarianship which is predicted to grow as an increasing number of university libraries assume responsibility for scholarly publishing and university presses.”

Among the duties: “Join the editorial team of the Harvard Library Bulletin. Collaborates with colleagues to relaunch the HLB as an online, open access journal….”

ACRL Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians, Draft Revision Feedback – ACRL Insider

“The ACRL Research and Scholarly Environment Committee (ReSEC) is seeking community input on proposed revisions to the ACRL Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians, approved by the ACRL Board of Directors during the 2016 ALA Annual Conference….

Please review the draft revision (PDF) on the ACRL website and send your feedback by July 1, 2018 to Steven Harris (stevenharris@unr.edu)….”

The Supercontinent of Scholarly Publishing? – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Three years ago, I felt called to the unhappy task of pointing out the many points of failure in what Lettie Conrad calls the “researcher experience.” I observed that “Instead of the rich and seamless digital library for scholarship that they need, researchers today encounter archipelagos of content bridged by infrastructure that is insufficient and often outdated.” Perhaps researchers need a supercontinent.

Since then, Sci-Hub has come on the scene, and publishers are in some combination of being outraged and/or scared. It may be that these businesses are too late. The formula for stabilizing a sector facing rampant piracy is the combination of legal action and seamless central access to content that allowed the music industry to find a future after Napster. Thus far, for scholarly publishers, legal action is not working, with cross-border enforcement challenging in this geopolitical moment. But what about the seamless centralized access to content? How is this sector going to accept the tectonic shift necessary to establish the supercontinent?…”

Trends, challenges and opportunities for LIS education: an interview with Carol Tenopir | Library Connect

“[Q] How will open science influence LIS education?

 
[A] LIS education needs to address how open science issues, including open access and open data, affect scholarship, scholars and, ultimately, science and society. For example, there is the human side that involves helping researchers learn about and participate in the process, while recognizing their concerns. Librarians also need the technical skills to provide metadata services, manage institutional repositories and assist with research data management to further the open science practices at their institutions. Researchers are faced with funding and governmental regulations requiring deposition of data and articles in repositories. Information science professionals can help this happen by providing either repositories or links to repositories and helping researchers with the processes needed to deposit. Preservation is an important part of this as well. And the need for education about high-quality sources never goes away.”

 

OA policy from US Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) (April 2014)

“Wide dissemination of the results of IMLS-funded projects advances the body of knowledge and professional practice in museum, library, and information services. For this reason, IMLS encourages creators of works resulting from IMLS funding to share their work whenever possible through forums such as institutional or disciplinary repositories, open-access journals, or other media. All work products resulting from IMLS funding should be distributed for free or at cost unless IMLS has given you written approval for another arrangement. IMLS expects you to ensure that final peer-reviewed manuscripts resulting from research conducted under an award are made available in a manner that permits the public to access, read, download, and analyze the work without charge…. If you collect and analyze data as part of an IMLS funded project, IMLS expects you to deposit data resulting from IMLS-funded research in a broadly accessible repository that allows the public to use the data without charge no later than the date upon which you submit your final 13 report to IMLS. You should deposit the data in a machine-readable, non-proprietary digital format to maximize search, retrieval, and analysis….”