Coronavirus and Open Science: Our reads and Open use cases – SPARC Europe

“As many of us find ourselves working from home we would like to suggest some pertinent reading connecting work on Open Science with COVID-19. Scores of blog posts and articles which demonstrate the value of Open at this time are being written.

I would in particular like to thank Peter Suber and his Open Access Tracking Project (OATP): a service we have been feeding and using for some time now. It is a vital source of news from across the world on Open research and education. If you want to follow more on COVID-19 and Open on this site, you can do so here.  OATP is crowd-sourced and updated in real time.
We have used this invaluable resource combined with our own research to create this curated collection of blogs, articles, news on calls to action and key open resources that showcase how open science supports COVID-19. We will add to it in the coming weeks.

How to use this resource

For those wanting to read about how Open Science leaders and thinkers consider how Open Science is serving to help solve the COVID-19 pandemic and what more needs to be done, the Open Access to research section is for you.
To see how the funders, governments, libraries and research communities are advocating for more access to information to support research through formal calls to action, we have gathered key initiatives calling for change in the Calls to Action section.
If you want to know what publishers are doing to unlock access to some of their materials see the dedicated section.
Last but not least, see the range of resources, e.g. datasets and tools created using Open Science organised by type of output for OS practitioners and researchers working on COVID-19.
Note that this collections was made in late March early April; it does not include all developments since then….”

Home – COVID-19 Open Access Resources – Research Guides at Harvard Library

“In response to the COVID-19 outbreak many publishers and vendors are making some or all of their content freely available. This guide lists some of these offers; it does not include material that is normally available through regular Harvard Library subscriptions. Please note that availability now will not guarantee availability in the future, and that these free items won’t necessarily be found in HOLLIS. As always, if there’s something you think the library should own, please fill out a purchase request form.

And if you need help finding something, email me directly, or Ask a Librarian!

This guide highlights the major offers that we’re aware of as of March 25, 2020. Please see this list designed for librarians for a more comprehensive list of offers. Also, the Harvard-based Open Access Tracking Project has an extensive, tagged library of information on OA. Offers related to the pandemic are tagged oa.humanitarian; follow that feed here….”

Open Access Directory – A resource for making sense of the open access landscape | Impact of Social Sciences

The Open Access Directory (OAD) is a wiki of factual lists on the subject of open access. Designed to make sense out of the chaos of different information about open access, in this post Nancy Pontika recounts why the OAD was created and outlines how it forms an important knowledge base for anyone seeking to learn about open access and its development.

OSFair – open-access-tracking-project-the-most-comprehensive-tool-to-stay-up-to-date-with-the-most-recent-open-access-developments

“The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) is a crowd-sourced project, aiming to provide a comprehensive Open Science (OS) feed, covering all OS subtopics, in all academic fields and regions of the world and in all languages. 

The project aims to tag new OS developments and disseminates this information to the end user in eight different types of feeds: 1) HTML, 2) RSS feed, 3) Atom, 4) JSONP, 5) Email, 6) Twitter, 7) PushBullet, and 8) Reddit. The OATP is the most comprehensive and easy to use tool where the whole OS community can contribute with tagging and capturing the open scholarly communications developments in open access, funders’ policies, copyright and open licenses, open data, research data management, and open tools and infrastructures, etc. 

Currently 80 taggers have tagged more than 77000 items in the OATP offering a comprehensive list of news items with self-sufficient summaries from experts, occasional comments, links to relevant developments and a searchable archive. Each tagged item offers also record metadata information, such as the date of the tag and the name of the tagger, while the tagged items range from blog posts, discussion forums, newspaper articles, open access books, journal articles, YouTube videos and many more. 

The OATP though is not merely an alert service, but also a classification system; it enables users to classify OS developments even when they are not new. The two most important facts about these “subtopic tags” is that they are all optional and they are all user-defined, which helps users track new items on the subtopics they care about. 

The OATP calls the OS community to become an OATP tagger by capturing OS related information that takes place in their own fields, countries and languages. …”

Open Peer Review: a Model & an Invitation (2019 update) | Sustaining the Knowledge Commons / Soutenir les savoirs communs

This is a 2019 update of a post originally published in 2005 on The Imaginary Journal of Poetic Economics; the original is republished here. This version reflects experience with open peer review (mine and that of others), further reflection, and research conducted since 2005.

These are some ideas for open peer review that can be used today in experiments that may be helpful to shape future systemic approaches. The overall goal is to facilitate open research by opening up preprints, increase transparency in the peer review process, and to allow peer reviewers to take credit for their work. Interested authors and/or reviewers can experiment with this approach today. For example, an author can post a preprint in a repository, seek volunteer reviewers through a listserv or other social media service for a relevant scholarly community and/or ask a colleague to serve as an editor to coordinate the review process and/or serve as a contact for blind reviews….”

Peter Suber: The largest obstacles to open access are unfamiliarity and misunderstanding of open access itself

I’ve already complained about the slowness of progress. So I can’t pretend to be patient. Nevertheless, we need patience to avoid mistaking slow progress for lack of progress, and I’m sorry to see some friends and allies make this mistake. We need impatience to accelerate progress, and patience to put slow progress in perspective. The rate of OA growth is fast relative to the obstacles, and slow relative to the opportunities.”

Peter Suber: The largest obstacles to open access are unfamiliarity and misunderstanding of open access itself

I’ve already complained about the slowness of progress. So I can’t pretend to be patient. Nevertheless, we need patience to avoid mistaking slow progress for lack of progress, and I’m sorry to see some friends and allies make this mistake. We need impatience to accelerate progress, and patience to put slow progress in perspective. The rate of OA growth is fast relative to the obstacles, and slow relative to the opportunities.”