Research Square

“Research Square is a preprint platform that allows you to share your work early, gain feedback and improve your manuscript, and discover emerging science all in one place….

Research Square features all the characteristics of a traditional preprint server, but with some notable differences:

All preprints are displayed in HTML. The full text is indexed and machine-readable so that it is more discoverable by search engines.
Authors can demonstrate to the community they meet established standards in scientific reporting by purchasing assessments in integrity, reproducibility, and statistical rigor. Badge icons are displayed on their article page for assessments they pass. Learn more about our badges here.
Video summaries can be added to the article page to communicate your research to a broader audience.
Readers can comment on a paper using our custom-built commenting system or the hypothes.is annotation tool.
Figures are rendered using a lightbox that allows for zooming and downloading. …”

 

Data sharing for novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

“On submission to the [Bulletin of the World Health Organization], all research manuscripts relevant to the coronavirus emergency will be assigned a digital object identifier and posted online in the “COVID-19 Open” collection within 24 hours while undergoing peer review. The data in these papers will thus be attributed to the authors while being freely available for unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided that the original work is properly cited as indicated by the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Intergovernmental Organizations license (CC BY IGO 3.0). Should a paper be accepted by the Bulletin following peer review, this open access review period will be reported in the final publication. If a paper does not meet the journal’s requirements after peer review, authors will be free to seek publication elsewhere. If the authors of any paper posted with the Bulletin in this context are unable to obtain acceptance with a suitable journal, WHO undertakes to publish these papers in its institutional repository as citable working papers, independently of the Bulletin. The choice of a pre-print platform remains the sole discretion of the author. This early access to research manuscripts at WHO builds on examples of other rapid information access platforms such as PROMED and F1000Research….”

Blog – Europe PMC: Making sense of preprint versions

“Europe PMC has been indexing preprints since 2018, hosting content initially from bioRxiv, ChemRxiv, PeerJ Preprints, F1000, and subsequently adding content from medRxiv and Beilstein Archives. Europe PMC now indexes over 100K preprints. Through a recent redesign of the search functionality, Europe PMC  highlights more clearly search results that are preprints (versus research articles or literature reviews, for example)….

However, an open question has been how to deal with the many different versions of a preprint appearing in the search results. The aim was to identify all versions of a preprint, link them together and offer a collapsed aggregate of these versions to users. To this end, Europe PMC has improved the presentation of preprint versions and displays only the most recent version of a preprint in the search result page….

Europe PMC links preprint versions based on their DOIs, allowing the user to access previous versions along with the edits, comments and citations associated with each specific version. From each preprint version the user can also link to the peer-reviewed, published version of the article if it is available in Europe PMC….”

Case study: Doing more with ORCID – UK ORCID Support

“The University of Cambridge research repository (Apollo), uses ORCID IDs as a unique identifier for researchers.  When a researcher submits a dataset to Apollo, a DOI is minted for the dataset through the DataCite service.   By including the ORCID in the metadata submitted to DataCite, DataCite then populates the ORCID registry entry for the researcher (with their permission) with information about the dataset, using an ‘auto-update’ feature. 

The result is that a link is created between the researcher and their data, through the ORCID ID identifying the researcher, and the DOI for the data assigned by DataCite. The persistent identifiers are used to connect researchers and their achievements, improving visibility and discoverability across different systems.  The workflow reduces duplication of effort in entering information and avoids input or identification errors….”

Plaudit · Open endorsements from the academic community

“Plaudit links researchers, identified by their ORCID, to research they endorse, identified by its DOI….

Because endorsements are publisher-independent and provided by known and trusted members of the academic community, they provide credibility for valuable research….

Plaudit is built on open infrastructure. We use permanent identifiers from ORCID and DOI, and endorsements are fed into CrossRef Event Data.

We’re open source, community-driven, and not for profit….”

Software review: COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations | SpringerLink

Abstract:  In this paper, we present COCI, the OpenCitations Index of Crossref open DOI-to-DOI citations (http://opencitations.net/index/coci). COCI is the first open citation index created by OpenCitations, in which we have applied the concept of citations as first-class data entities, and it contains more than 445 million DOI-to-DOI citation links derived from the data available in Crossref. These citations are described using the resource description framework by means of the newly extended version of the OpenCitations Data Model (OCDM). We introduce the workflow we have developed for creating these data, and also show the additional services that facilitate the access to and querying of these data via different access points: a SPARQL endpoint, a REST API, bulk downloads, Web interfaces, and direct access to the citations via HTTP content negotiation. Finally, we present statistics regarding the use of COCI citation data, and we introduce several projects that have already started to use COCI data for different purposes.