Good Practices – Research Institutes – DORA

“DORA’s ultimate aim is not to accumulate signatures but to promote real change in research assessment.  One of the keys to this is the development of robust and time-efficient ways of evaluating research and researchers that do not rely on journal impact factors. We are keen to gather and share existing examples of good practice in research assessment, including approaches to funding and fellowships, hiring and promotion, and awarding prizes, that emphasize research itself and not where it is published. 

If you know of exemplary research assessment methods that could provide inspiration and ideas for research institutes, funders, journals, professional societies, or researchers, please contact DORA….”

Open Science Training Handbook | FOSTER

“A group of fourteen authors came together in February 2018 at the TIB (German National Library of Science and Technology) in Hannover to create an open, living handbook on Open Science training. High-quality trainings are fundamental when aiming at a cultural change towards the implementation of Open Science principles. Teaching resources provide great support for Open Science instructors and trainers. The Open Science training handbook will be a key resource and a first step towards developing Open Access and Open Science curricula and andragogies. Supporting and connecting an emerging Open Science community that wishes to pass on their knowledge as multipliers, the handbook will enrich training activities and unlock the community’s full potential. The handbook is managed in this GitHub repository….”

Publishing in 2020: A checklist to support a shift in behaviour to achieve best practice – Cobey – – European Journal of Clinical Investigation – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  When it comes to publishing, researchers’ stated norms for established best practices often do not align with their actual behaviour1. Consider the example of data sharing: failure to share research data when publishing is increasingly viewed as a barrier to research progress, and to contribute to waste and inefficiency2. Policies seeking to maximise the value of public funding are at the heart of the data sharing movement. Patients appear to be overwhelmingly agreeable to their data being shared too3.

We have removed the Seal on more than 40 journals – News Service

“DOAJ constantly reviews existing records in DOAJ to ensure that they meet DOAJ criteria, particularly those with the Seal.

Recently 1432 journals in DOAJ had the Seal. Today that number is 1339. Journals that have been awarded the Seal adhere to outstanding best practice and meet to our 7 carefully chosen criteria. These criteria are indicators of high commitment to open access best practices.

In the last few weeks, we performed an in-depth review of the journals with the Seal to check they still comply with these criteria. After the review, we found out that 45 of the journals no longer met one or more of the criteria. We contacted all the journals in this situation and we are happy to communicate that we have already restored some of the Seals….”

Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing – more language versions now available – OASPA

“We are pleased to say that DOAJ has recently made more language versions of the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing available, bringing the total number to eighteen.

The Principles are available below and here and all translated versions are available on the DOAJ site at the following links: Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, Farsi, Finnish, French, Hindi, Indonesian, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian….”

Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing – more language versions now available – OASPA

“We are pleased to say that DOAJ has recently made more language versions of the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing available, bringing the total number to eighteen.

The Principles are available below and here and all translated versions are available on the DOAJ site at the following links: Arabic, Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, English, Farsi, Finnish, French, Hindi, Indonesian, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian….”

Educopia partners with Curtin University-led alliance to increase the impact of university-based research | Educopia Institute

“A new alliance of researchers led by Curtin University in partnership with Educopia Institute will work together to improve the way research is shared, charting new pathways for the future of universities around the world.

Fresh strategies to reform the role of universities and build them into information-sharing Open Knowledge Institutions will be developed through the coalition of like-minded universities, in a $540,000 project led by Professor Cameron Neylon and Associate Professor Lucy Montgomery, both from Curtin’s Centre for Culture and Technology within the School of Media, Creative Arts and Social Inquiry. The project has been funded by UK-based Arcadia – a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, recognizing the success of the Curtin research team in leading research and practice on Open Knowledge universities….

Educopia’s Executive Director Katherine Skinner said the new alliance would provide insights into best practice and a more powerful voice for change….”

 

Publication and Dissemination of Research: A guide supporting the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

“Consistent with international expectations that research outputs are openly available, institutions should support researchers to ensure their research outputs are openly accessible in an institutional or other online repository, or on a publisher’s website….”

Transforming the culture of data science | The Alan Turing Institute

“The crisis of reproducibility in science is well known. The combination of ‘publish or perish’ incentives, secrecy around data and the drive for novelty at all costs can result in fragile advances and lots of wasted time and money. Even in data science, when a paper is published there is generally no way for an outsider to verify its results, because the data from which the findings were derived are not available for scrutiny. Such science cannot be built upon very easily: siloed science is slow science.

That’s one of the reasons funders and publishers are beginning to require that publications include access to the underlying data and analysis code. It’s clear that this new era of data science needs a new cultural and practical approach, one which embraces openness and collaboration more than ever before. To this end, a group of Turing researchers have created The Turing Way – an evolving online “handbook” on how to conduct world-leading, reproducible research in data science and artificial intelligence….”

SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

“SPARC is pleased to release our 2018-2019 Connect OER Annual Report, which offers insights about OER activities across North America. This year’s report examines the current state of OER activities featuring data from 132 institutions in the U.S. and Canada. Our intent is that these insights will help inform SPARC members, open education advocates, and the library community about current trends, best practices, and the collective impact being achieved through OER at participating institutions….”