Publication and Dissemination of Research: A guide supporting the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

“Consistent with international expectations that research outputs are openly available, institutions should support researchers to ensure their research outputs are openly accessible in an institutional or other online repository, or on a publisher’s website….”

Transforming the culture of data science | The Alan Turing Institute

“The crisis of reproducibility in science is well known. The combination of ‘publish or perish’ incentives, secrecy around data and the drive for novelty at all costs can result in fragile advances and lots of wasted time and money. Even in data science, when a paper is published there is generally no way for an outsider to verify its results, because the data from which the findings were derived are not available for scrutiny. Such science cannot be built upon very easily: siloed science is slow science.

That’s one of the reasons funders and publishers are beginning to require that publications include access to the underlying data and analysis code. It’s clear that this new era of data science needs a new cultural and practical approach, one which embraces openness and collaboration more than ever before. To this end, a group of Turing researchers have created The Turing Way – an evolving online “handbook” on how to conduct world-leading, reproducible research in data science and artificial intelligence….”

SPARC Releases Connect OER Annual Report for 2018-2019 – SPARC

“SPARC is pleased to release our 2018-2019 Connect OER Annual Report, which offers insights about OER activities across North America. This year’s report examines the current state of OER activities featuring data from 132 institutions in the U.S. and Canada. Our intent is that these insights will help inform SPARC members, open education advocates, and the library community about current trends, best practices, and the collective impact being achieved through OER at participating institutions….”

OA Monographs in Europe’s Research Libraries: Best-Practices, Opportunities & Challenges – LIBER

“Over 80% of surveyed LIBER libraries say they distribute Open Access (OA) books via a repository and include them in discovery services or catalogues. A further 40% publish OA books, or plan to do so, and a quarter provides library funding to pay author fees related to OA book publishing.

These are among the insights from a recent questionnaire on OA Monographs, circulated in April by LIBER’s Open Access Working Group. The survey aimed to investigate the activities and strategies related to OA books already in place across LIBER’s network and to identify best practices, opportunities and challenges related to the publishing and implementation of OA for monographs….”

New free eBook: How to publish low-cost, high-quality open access journals online

“Learn key strategies for developing an open access journal publishing program in Scholastica’s free guide, How to publish low-cost, high-quality open access journals online! Get your copy here!

Are you working to develop an open access (OA) journal publishing program at a scholarly association or academic institution?

Whether you’re cultivating an established OA publishing program or you’re starting your first OA journal, you’re sure to have a full plate. As a journal publisher, you have to oversee the entire lifecycle of your publications—from peer review to copyediting to article production to content hosting and dissemination. It’s a lot to manage!…”

Survey on Scientific Shared Resource Rigor and Reproducibility

Abstract:  Shared scientific resources, also known as core facilities, support a significant portion of the research conducted at biomolecular research institutions. The Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) established the Committee on Core Rigor and Reproducibility (CCoRRe) to further its mission of integrating advanced technologies, education, and communication in the operations of shared scientific resources in support of reproducible research. In order to first assess the needs of the scientific shared resource community, the CCoRRe solicited feedback from ABRF members via a survey. The purpose of the survey was to gain information on how U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) initiatives on advancing scientific rigor and reproducibility influenced current services and new technology development. In addition, the survey aimed to identify the challenges and opportunities related to implementation of new reporting requirements and to identify new practices and resources needed to ensure rigorous research. The results revealed a surprising unfamiliarity with the NIH guidelines. Many of the perceived challenges to the effective implementation of best practices (i.e., those designed to ensure rigor and reproducibility) were similarly noted as a challenge to effective provision of support services in a core setting. Further, most cores routinely use best practices and offer services that support rigor and reproducibility. These services include access to well-maintained instrumentation and training on experimental design and data analysis as well as data management. Feedback from this survey will enable the ABRF to build better educational resources and share critical best-practice guidelines. These resources will become important tools to the core community and the researchers they serve to impact rigor and transparency across the range of science and technology.

Myth-busting: Journals must meet the DOAJ Seal criteria to be indexed in DOAJ – News Service

“There is a common misunderstanding that for a journal to have its application accepted and be indexed in DOAJ it must meet all the criteria for the DOAJ Seal. There is an assumption, born out of that misunderstanding, that journals in DOAJ without the Seal are of inferior quality. This is also a myth….”

OpenAIRE Guidelines — OpenAIRE Guidelines documentation

“Welcome to the OpenAIRE Guidelines. The intention of this is to provide a public space to share OpenAIREs work on interoperability and to engage with the community. The OpenAIRE Guidelines helps repository managers expose publications, datasets and CRIS metadata via the OAI-PMH protocol in order to integrate with OpenAIRE infrastructure.

OpenAIRE Guidelines have been released for publication repositories, data archives, CRIS systems, software repositories and repositories of other research products respectively: …”

2019:Libraries/Reaching Authors of Academic Journals about Open Access – Wikimania

“More and more methods are emerging by which individuals and small teams can reach authors of important scholarly articles to encourage them to provide Open Access to their work.

This ideation session will report on some best practices, such as:

the project done in 2017 by Italian Wikipedians to reach out to 96K senior scholars of works cited in English Wikipedia that could have been shared but had not yet been.
the “Open Letter(s) on Open Access” [#OALetters] in which a small team crafted open letters to authors of important works which were not yet shared. This project revealed how capabilities of the Open Access Button could be deployed by small teams to systematically message authors at scale.
new features of the Open Access Button [#OAButton] have come out recently (and there are likely to be more by mid-Sept) which may add to the portfolio of tools/techniques available to this purpose.
an example of a scholarly article where the author went all out to have her cited sources open. It dramatically improves readability (which clearly improves impact)….”