Wikimedia in Universities

“You are being invited to participate in a survey titled ‘Wikimedia in Universities’. This survey is being done by Nick Sheppard from the University of Leeds.

We are also interested in how other organisations are using Wikimedia e.g. Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) The purpose of this survey is to gain insight into the use of the Wikimedia suite of tools in universities and GLAM organisations and will take you approximately 10 minutes to complete. You may choose not to participate. If you decide to participate you may withdraw at any time. If you decide not to participate or if you withdraw, you will not be penalised….”

WikiConference North America

“WikiConference North America is the annual conference of Wikimedia enthusiasts and volunteers from throughout North America, including the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The 2019 conference will take place in Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 8-11. Join Wikipedia, -media, -data, and -cite enthusiasts for a long weekend of collaboration and discovery….”

WikiConference North America

“WikiConference North America is the annual conference of Wikimedia enthusiasts and volunteers from throughout North America, including the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The 2019 conference will take place in Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 8-11. Join Wikipedia, -media, -data, and -cite enthusiasts for a long weekend of collaboration and discovery….”

WikiJournal – Meta

A site where authors can write their works directly online. The works then undergo independent scholarly peer review before being officially published in the journal.

Currently hosted in Wikiversity: WikiJournal User Group, with the main journals being WikiJournal of Medicine and WikiJournal of Science (Humanities journal starting up).

It provides a way of bridging the Wikipedia-Academia gap by enabling academics, scholars and professionals to contribute expert knowledge to the Wikimedia movement in the familiar academic publishing format that directly rewards scholars with cite-able publications….”

Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (Public Lab)

“Public Lab was founded in the wake of the 2010 BP oil disaster. During the spill, there was an information blackout for residents of the coastal region, as well as the rest of the world. No one was accurately tracking what was happening on the ground. In response a group of concerned residents, environmental advocates, designers, and social scientists lofted “community satellites,” made from balloons, kites and digital cameras, over the spill to collect real time data about its impact. Local citizens collected the images, and through a newly created open source platform, contributors stitch over 100,000 aerial images into maps of the coastline before, during, and after the oil spread. These high-resolution maps were featured by BBC and New York Times, among others, allowing residents to speak their truth about what was going on in the Gulf Coast.

The success of the grassroots mapping effort galvanized the group to found Public Lab as a new research and social space for the development of low-cost tools for community-based environmental monitoring and assessment….”

OpenResearch

“This semantic wiki at OpenResearch aims at making the world of science more visible and accessible. Information about scientific events, research projects, publishers, journals etc. is scattered around on the Web. For researchers (especially young ones without decades of experience) it is often difficult to find the relevant venues, people or tools. Also research is increasingly dynamic and multi-disciplinary, so the boundaries between communities blur and new research directions emerge. With this semantic Wiki, we aim to make information about scientific events, research groups, tools, journals etc. more accessible. OpenResearch is not restricted to any field of science….”

Commons In A Box

“Commons In A Box (CBOX) is a free software project aimed at turning the infrastructure that successfully powers the CUNY Academic Commons into a free, distributable, easy-to-install package. Commons In A Box is a project of the City University of New York and the Graduate Center, CUNY and is made possible by a generous grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

CBOX takes the complexity out of creating a Commons site, helping organizations create a space where their members can discuss issues, collaborate on projects, and share their work. CBOX also provides:

  • Out-of-the-box functionality with an intuitive set-up that guides site administrators through each step of installation.
  • A powerful, responsive, highly customizable theme developed for community engagement, based on PressCrew’s Infinity Theming Engine.
  • Responsive design for easy viewing on many devices, including tablets and smartphones.
  • Collaborative document creation and file sharing.
  • Reply-By-Email functionality for quick, on-the-go communication.
  • Compatibility with many other WordPress and BuddyPress themes and plug-ins.
  • Expansive wiki options….”

What can fact-checkers learn from Wikipedia? We asked the boss of its nonprofit owner – Poynter

“Several studies have shown that Wikipedia is as reliable if not more reliable than more traditional encyclopedias. A 2012 study commissioned by Oxford University and the Wikimedia Foundation, for example, showed that when compared with other encyclopedic entries, Wikipedia articles scored higher overall with respect to accuracy, references and overall judgment when compared with articles from more traditional encyclopedias. Wikipedia articles were also generally seen as being more up-to-date, better-referenced and at least as comprehensive and neutral. This study followed a similar 2005 study from Nature that found Wikipedia articles on science as reliable as their counterparts from Encyclopedia Britannica.”

Amplifying the impact of open access: Wikipedia and the diffusion of science – Teplitskiy – 2016 – Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  With the rise of Wikipedia as a first-stop source for scientific information, it is important to understand whether Wikipedia draws upon the research that scientists value most. Here we identify the 250 most heavily used journals in each of 26 research fields (4,721 journals, 19.4M articles) indexed by the Scopus database, and test whether topic, academic status, and accessibility make articles from these journals more or less likely to be referenced on Wikipedia. We find that a journal’s academic status (impact factor) and accessibility (open access policy) both strongly increase the probability of it being referenced on Wikipedia. Controlling for field and impact factor, the odds that an open access journal is referenced on the English Wikipedia are 47% higher compared to paywall journals. These findings provide evidence is that a major consequence of open access policies is to significantly amplify the diffusion of science, through an intermediary like Wikipedia, to a broad audience.