Major upgrade for TagTeam, the open-source tagging platform | Berkman Klein Center

[TagTeam is the software running the Open Access Tracking Project.]

“We’re happy to announce a major upgrade to TagTeam, the open-source tagging platform developed by the Harvard Open Access Project. TagTeam allows users to manage open, tag-based research projects on any topic, provide real-time alerts of new developments, and organize knowledge for easy searching and sharing. Unlike other tagging platforms, it lets project owners guide the evolution of their tag vocabulary in a process it calls folksonomy in, ontology out.

The upgrade has more than 20 major new features….

These new developments will support projects already running on TagTeam, including the Open Access Tracking Project from Harvard Open Access Project….”

Want to Support Open Access? Volunteer for the Open Access Tracking Project

The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) provides a constant stream of up-to-date information about open access issues in a primary feed and in a number of secondary feeds that focus on specialized OA subtopics. It offers the primary feed in a variety of distribution options, including email, Google+, HTML, RSS, Twitter, and others. It is an invaluable source of information for open access advocates, research data specialists, and scholarly communication specialists, and it provides important support for the open access movement as a whole.

Based at the Harvard Open Access Project, the OATP was launched by Peter Suber. Suber’s SPARC Open Access Newsletter and his Free Online Scholarship Newsletter played an important part in getting the open access movement off the ground. The OATP continues the mission of those groundbreaking publications using the open source TagTeam software, which was developed for the OATP.

Launched with the help of grant funding, the OATP will enter a new an all-volunteer phase at the end of August 2018. To continue this crowd-sourced project, new volunteers are needed. You can help move the OA agenda forward by being one of them. This wiki page explains how you can join the team and start tagging.

By volunteering just a bit of time to the OATP, you can make a significant difference.”

OATP introduction – Harvard Open Access Project

“The Open Access Tracking Project (OATP) is a crowd-sourced project running on free and open-source software to capture news and comment on open access (OA) to research. It has two missions: (1) create real-time alerts for OA-related developments, and (2) organize knowledge of the field, by tag or subtopic, for easy searching and sharing….”

Open Access Tracking Project

The home page of the Open Access Tracking Project. “OATP uses social tagging to capture new developments on open access to research. The OATP mission is (1) to provide a real-time alert service for OA-related news and comment, and (2) to organize knowledge of the field by tag or subtopic. The project publishes a comprehensive primary feed of new OA developments, and hundreds of smaller secondary feeds on OA subtopics, one for each project tag.”

How big was OA Week this year? How comprehensive is OATP?

“The Open Access Tracking Project (+OATP, @oatp) uses social tagging to generate real-time alerts to new OA-related developments — and it aims to be comprehensive. In the six months leading up to this year’s OA Week period, its primary feed published an average of 788 items per month. 

The OA Week tsunami began in September, peaked in October, and tapered off in November. In those three months to date (up to Nov 22), the same feed averaged 1,097 items per month. 

Of those 3,300 items, 376 or 11% were explicitly about OA Week itself, and tagged with oa.oa_week….”

Inconsistent XML as a Barrier to Reuse of Open Access Content – Journal Article Tag Suite Conference (JATS-Con) Proceedings 2013 – NCBI Bookshelf

Abstract:  In this paper, we will describe the current state of some of the tagging of articles within the PMC Open Access subset. As a case study, we will use our experiences developing the Open Access Media Importer, a tool to harvest content from the OA subset for automated upload to Wikimedia Commons.

Tagging inconsistencies stretch across several aspects of the articles, ranging from licensing to keywords to the media types of supplementary materials. While all of these complicate large-scale reuse, the unclear licensing statements had the greatest impact, requiring us to implement text mining-like algorithms in order to accurately determine whether or not specific content was compatible with reuse on Wikimedia Commons.
Besides presenting examples of incorrectly tagged XML from a range of publishers, we will also explore past and current efforts towards standardization of license tagging, and we will describe a set of recommendations related to tagging practices of certain data, to ensure that it is both compatible with existing standards, and consistent and machine-readable.

Inconsistent XML as a Barrier to Reuse of Open Access Content

Abstract:  In our paper, we described the current state of some of the tagging of articles within the PMC Open Access subset. As a case study, we used our experiences developing the Open Access Media Importer, a tool to harvest content from the OA subset and automatically upload it to Wikimedia Commons.

Tagging inconsistencies stretch across several aspects of the articles, ranging from licensing to keywords to the media types of supplementary materials. While all of these complicate large-scale reuse, the unclear licensing statements required us to implement text mining-like algorithms in order to accurately determine whether or not specific content was compatible with reuse on Wikimedia Commons.
Besides presenting examples of incorrectly tagged XML from a range of publishers, we will also explore past and current efforts towards standardization of license tagging, and we will describe a set of recommendations for generators of content on how best to tag certain data so that it is both compatible with existing standards, and consistent and machine-readable.