Coleridge Initiative – Show US the Data | Kaggle

“This competition challenges data scientists to show how publicly funded data are used to serve science and society. Evidence through data is critical if government is to address the many threats facing society, including; pandemics, climate change, Alzheimer’s disease, child hunger, increasing food production, maintaining biodiversity, and addressing many other challenges. Yet much of the information about data necessary to inform evidence and science is locked inside publications.

Can natural language processing find the hidden-in-plain-sight data citations? Can machine learning find the link between the words used in research articles and the data referenced in the article?

Now is the time for data scientists to help restore trust in data and evidence. In the United States, federal agencies are now mandated to show how their data are being used. The new Foundations of Evidence-based Policymaking Act requires agencies to modernize their data management. New Presidential Executive Orders are pushing government agencies to make evidence-based decisions based on the best available data and science. And the government is working to respond in an open and transparent way.

This competition will build just such an open and transparent approach. …”

???????? ? ?????????? ???? ?? ???????? ?? ???????????? ?? ???????? ????? ? ????????? ???????? | ???? ?????? ???????????

From Google’s English:  “By Order of the Minister of Education and Science, a National Plan for the Development of the Open Science Initiative in the Republic of Bulgaria has been approved. The plan sets out the strategic goals, the necessary steps and tools for the transition to the transformation of open science into a standard practice for conducting research.

This plan should be promoted and implemented in a coordinated and joint manner by the scientific community in the country and by the organizations funding research. It will upgrade the Bulgarian portal for open science – https://bpos.bg/ , will create new institutional repositories for data and publications and will ensure the connection of Bulgarian resources with the European cloud for open science. The implementation of the National Plan will also provide conditions for increasing the scientometric indicators, citations and visibility of Bulgarian scientists.

The main goal of the Open Science Initiative is to provide researchers and the public in the Republic of Bulgaria with access to scientific publications reviewed by independent experts, reliable research data and results in an open and non-discriminatory manner at the earliest possible stage of dissemination, as well as to provide an opportunity for their use and reuse.

The expected benefits are transparency and accountability of public funding for research; increase innovation capacity by combining their own knowledge with the available scientific results of publicly funded research.

You can view and download the National Plan for Development of the Open Science Initiative in the Republic of Bulgaria here: https://www.mon.bg/upload/24848/plan-otvorena-nauka_130121.pdf …”

Books Contain Multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing · COPIM

“Books contain multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing is a three-part research and scoping report created to support the Experimental Publishing and Reuse Work Package (WP 6) of the COPIM project. It also serves as a resource for the scholarly community, especially for authors and publishers interested in pursuing more experimental forms of book publishing.

COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is a 3-year project led by Coventry University as part of an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access (OA) book publishers and infrastructure providers and is funded by The Research England Development Fund and Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. COPIM is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable OA book publishing to flourish, delivering major improvements in the infrastructures used by OA book publishers and those publishers making a transition to OA. The project addresses the key technological, structural, and organisational hurdles—around funding, production, dissemination, discovery, reuse, and archiving—that are standing in the way of the wider adoption and impact of OA books. COPIM will realign OA book publishing away from competing commercial service providers to a more horizontal and cooperative knowledge-sharing approach.

As part of seven connected Work Packages, COPIM will work on 1) integrated capacity-building amongst presses; 2) access to and development of consortial, institutional, and other funding channels; 3) development and piloting of appropriate business models; 4) cost reductions achieved by economies of scale; 5) mutually supportive governance models; 6) integration into library, repository, and digital learning environments; 7) the re-use of and experimentation with OA books; 8) the effective and robust archiving of OA content; and 9) knowledge transfer to stakeholders through various pilots….”

Books Contain Multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing · COPIM

“Books contain multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing is a three-part research and scoping report created to support the Experimental Publishing and Reuse Work Package (WP 6) of the COPIM project. It also serves as a resource for the scholarly community, especially for authors and publishers interested in pursuing more experimental forms of book publishing.

COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is a 3-year project led by Coventry University as part of an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access (OA) book publishers and infrastructure providers and is funded by The Research England Development Fund and Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. COPIM is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable OA book publishing to flourish, delivering major improvements in the infrastructures used by OA book publishers and those publishers making a transition to OA. The project addresses the key technological, structural, and organisational hurdles—around funding, production, dissemination, discovery, reuse, and archiving—that are standing in the way of the wider adoption and impact of OA books. COPIM will realign OA book publishing away from competing commercial service providers to a more horizontal and cooperative knowledge-sharing approach.

As part of seven connected Work Packages, COPIM will work on 1) integrated capacity-building amongst presses; 2) access to and development of consortial, institutional, and other funding channels; 3) development and piloting of appropriate business models; 4) cost reductions achieved by economies of scale; 5) mutually supportive governance models; 6) integration into library, repository, and digital learning environments; 7) the re-use of and experimentation with OA books; 8) the effective and robust archiving of OA content; and 9) knowledge transfer to stakeholders through various pilots….”

Reusable Research Webinar

“Open, reproducible, and reliable research is critical for the scientific process. Although sharing data, code, documentation, and workflows associated with papers encourages scholars to turn a more careful eye to their work, many challenges remain, which will prevent other researchers from validating and building on prior work. This webinar will present relevant projects, approaches, and practices that advance research sharing for reproducibility and reuse. The overarching goal is to facilitate an exchange of ideas while discussing the current standards, challenges, and opportunities.

The primary audience for this webinar is data scientists, researchers, data curators, managers of digital libraries and repositories. However, anyone interested in reusable research or computational reproducibility is welcome to join….”

Guest Post – Citing Software in Scholarly Publishing to Improve Reproducibility, Reuse, and Credit – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Software is essential to research, and is regularly an element of the work described in scholarly articles. However, these articles often don’t properly cite the software, leading to problems finding and accessing it, which in turns leads to problems with reproducibility, reuse, and proper credit for the software’s developers. In response, the FORCE11 Software Citation Implementation Working Group, comprised of scholarly communications researchers, representatives of nineteen major journals, publishers, and scholarly infrastructures (Crossref, DataCite), have proposed a set of customizable guidelines to clearly identify the software and credit its developers and maintainers. This follows the earlier development of a set of Software Citation Principles. To realize their full benefit, we are now urging publishers to adapt and adopt these guidelines to implement the principles and to meet their communities’ particular needs….”

What About Reuse? A Study on the Use of Open Educational Resources in Dutch Higher Education | Baas | Open Praxis

Abstract:  Extensive research has taken place over the years to examine the barriers of OER adoption, but little empirical studies has been undertaken to map the amount of OER reuse. The discussion around the actual use of OER, outside the context in which they were developed, remains ongoing. Previous studies have already shown that searching and evaluating resources are barriers for actual reuse. Hence, in this quantitative survey study we explored teachers’ practices with resources in Higher Education Institutes in the Netherlands. The survey had three runs, each in a different context, with a total of 439 respondents. The results show that resources that are hard or time-consuming to develop are most often reused from third parties without adaptations. Resources that need to be more context specific are often created by teachers themselves. To improve our understanding of reuse, follow-up studies must explore reuse with a more qualitative research design in order to explore how these hidden practices of dark reuse look like and how teachers and students benefit of it.

 

Identifying Data Sharing and Reuse with Scholix: Potentials and Limitations: Patterns

“Highlights

Scholexplorer data can be used to identify reuse and citation of published datasets
More dataset and article links can be identified now with the Scholexplorer API
Many links result from former manual data curation instead of direct data citation
Author and dataset owner affiliation would help identify different data use cases….”