EOSC (Europen Open Science Cloud for Research Pilot Project)

“The EOSCpilot project will support the first phase in the development of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). It will:

  • Propose and trial the governance framework for the EOSC and contribute to the development of European open science policy and best practice;
  • Develop a number of demonstrators functioning as high-profile pilots that integrate services and infrastructures to show interoperability and its benefits in a number of scientific domains; and
  • Engage with a broad range of stakeholders, crossing borders and communities, to build the trust and skills required for adoption of an open approach to scientific research.

These actions will build on and leverage already available resources and capabilities from research infrastructure and e-infrastructure organisations to maximise their use across the research community.

  • Reduce fragmentation between data infrastructures by working across scientific and economic domains, countries and governance models, and
  • Improve interoperability between data infrastructures by progressing and demonstrating how data and resources can be shared even when they are large and complex and in varied formats.

The EOSCpilot project will improve the ability to preserve and reuse data resources and provide an important step towards building a dependable open innovation environment where data from publicly funded research is always open and there are clear incentives and rewards for the sharing of data and resources….”

European Open Science Cloud, pilot project

“EOSCpilot Mission

Facilitating access of researchers across all scientific disciplines to data

Establishing a governance and business model that sets the rules for the use of EOSC

Creating a cross-border and multi-disciplinary open innovation environment for research data, knowledge and services

Establishing global standards for interoperability for scientific data…”

SCHOLIX

“The Scholix initiative is a high level interoperability framework for exchanging information about the links between scholarly literature and data. It aims to build an open information ecosystem to understand systematically what data underpins literature and what literature references data. The DLI Service is the first exemplar aggregation and query service fed by the Scholix open information ecosystem. The Scholix framework together with the DLI aggregation are designed to enable other 3rd party services (domain-specific aggregations, integrations with other global services, discovery tools, impact assessments etc).

Scholix is an evolving lightweight set of Guidelines to increase interoperability rather than a normative standard….”

Fulcrum

“Fulcrum is a publishing platform currently under development that helps publishers present the full richness of their authors’ research outputs in a durable, discoverable, and flexible form….By adopting an agile development approach and working in partnership with the Hydra open source community, Fulcrum is responsive to the changing needs of digital scholars….Built on research university library infrastructure specifically designed to curate digital objects, Fulcrum is a trusted steward committed to preservation and stability….Interoperable with other publishing tools and integrated into the information supply chain, Fulcrum ensures that content is discovered by readers and impact is tracked….”

Green Is Not the New Gold: Beware of False Models for Open Access – ASCB

“Green OA would be an easy solution because it sounds like OA and seems to interfere minimally with current publishing mechanisms, but I will argue that it is an expensive halfway house with limited benefit to the scientific community or indeed the public. If we want OA to work in a sustainable manner for papers in high-quality, peer-reviewed journals, it has to be gold and not green. And even if we don’t care about peer review or quality control by journals, there is a better solution than institutional green OA for disseminating articles: the posting of preprints….”

Survey: Patients Regard Open Access to Their Medical Records as Critical to Receiving High Quality Health Care | Business Wire

“CAMPBELL, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In the era of digital health, patients have very high expectations for medical information sharing, but they may not be aware of the health care industry’s current limitations. That’s according to a new digital health survey released today by Transcend Insights, a population health management company. The survey found that a vast majority of patients (97 percent) believe it is important for any health institution, regardless of type or location, to have access to their full medical history in order to receive high-quality care.

Patients were also asked to rate factors that are most important to receiving personalized care. Top priorities for patients included having access to their own medical records (92 percent) and the ability for care providers to easily share and receive important information about their medical history—wherever they needed treatment (93 percent).

Are these demands being met? The survey suggests that there could be a significant gap between the level of information sharing that patients expect and what is possible today. While the health care industry has undergone rapid digitization in the last decade, effectively sharing medical information and communicating across many different health care information technology systems — often referred to as interoperability — has remained elusive.

According to a recent interoperability study conducted by the American Hospital Association, only a quarter of all hospitals are able to functionally exchange (find, send, receive and use) clinical information with external providers. Another study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that only 34.8 percent of specialists receive information about a patient from their referring primary care physician (PCP), even when the PCP attempts to share patient records. In other words, data is not traveling with patients despite the importance that they place on open access to their information.”