African Principles for Open Access in Scholarly Communication – AfricArXiv

“1) Academic Research and knowledge from and about Africa should be freely available to all who wish to access, use or reuse it while at the same time being protected from misuse and misappropriation.

2) African scientists and scientists working on African topics and/or territory will make their research achievements including underlying datasets available in a digital Open Access repository or journal and an explicit Open Access license is applied.

3) African research output should be made available in the principle common language of the global science community as well as in one or more local African languages – at least in summary.

4) It is important to take into consideration in the discussions indigenous and traditional knowledge in its various forms.

5) It is necessary to respect the diverse dynamics of knowledge generation and circulation by discipline and geographical area.

6) It is necessary to recognise, respect and acknowledge the regional diversity of African scientific journals, institutional repositories and academic systems.

7) African Open Access policies and initiatives promote Open Scholarship, Open Source and Open Standards for interoperability purposes.

8) Multi-stakeholder mechanisms for collaboration and cooperation should be established to ensure equal participation across the African continent.

9) Economic investment in Open Access is consistent with its benefit to societies on the African continent – therefore institutions and governments in Africa provide the enabling environment, infrastructure and capacity building required to support Open Access

10) African Open Access stakeholders and actors keep up close dialogues with representatives from all world regions, namely Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania….”

African Principles for Open Access in Scholarly Communication – AfricArXiv

“1) Academic Research and knowledge from and about Africa should be freely available to all who wish to access, use or reuse it while at the same time being protected from misuse and misappropriation.

2) African scientists and scientists working on African topics and/or territory will make their research achievements including underlying datasets available in a digital Open Access repository or journal and an explicit Open Access license is applied.

3) African research output should be made available in the principle common language of the global science community as well as in one or more local African languages – at least in summary.

4) It is important to take into consideration in the discussions indigenous and traditional knowledge in its various forms.

5) It is necessary to respect the diverse dynamics of knowledge generation and circulation by discipline and geographical area.

6) It is necessary to recognise, respect and acknowledge the regional diversity of African scientific journals, institutional repositories and academic systems.

7) African Open Access policies and initiatives promote Open Scholarship, Open Source and Open Standards for interoperability purposes.

8) Multi-stakeholder mechanisms for collaboration and cooperation should be established to ensure equal participation across the African continent.

9) Economic investment in Open Access is consistent with its benefit to societies on the African continent – therefore institutions and governments in Africa provide the enabling environment, infrastructure and capacity building required to support Open Access

10) African Open Access stakeholders and actors keep up close dialogues with representatives from all world regions, namely Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Oceania….”

Sage Bionetworks Executive Urges Adoption of Standards to Create ‘Open Science’ | GenomeWeb

Since All of Us is collecting samples and health data from 1 million people at healthcare facilities all over the country, the only way this information dissemination will work is because NIH and its partners are standardizing the results according to the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) Common Data Model. All of Us also is normalizing phenotypic information on the Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technology (SMART) on FHIRframework, based on the Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard….

In a keynote address to open the annual Bio-IT World Conference & Expo here yesterday, John Wilbanks, chief commons officer at Sage Bionetworks, was clear about his preference for those standards to promote interoperability.  

“Choose OMOP or SMART on FHIR and don’t choose anything else,” he said. The openness of standards and of data itself is key, according to Wilbanks, a longtime advocate of open data….

Sometimes that is because scientists tend to strip out many of the insights before they report results, but often it is due to the fact that researchers do not have or will not make the time to annotate their data in a way that would make their findings more useful to others.

“Until, in my opinion, we figure out how to get machine learning and [artificial intelligence] to do that annotation for us, it’s going to be really hard to have data get as reusable as open-source software is,” Wilbanks said. “But we will eventually get there.” …”

Launch of the Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication Platforms to democratize knowledge

In Inclusive Knowledge Societies, people have ready access to information and communications resources, in languages and formats that suit them, and possess the skills to interpret and make use of them. Within this framework, promoting access to scientific scholarship (in the broadest sense) has remained a central challenge to most Member States. UNESCO, with its partners, continues to pursue this objective through its programmes on Open Science and Open Access as well as in partnership with other key actors .

At a session organized by UNESCO on 8th April at the WSIS Forum 2019 in Geneva,  coordinators of six platforms – AmeliCA(link is external)AJOL(link is external)Érudit(link is external)J-STAGE(link is external)OpenEdition(link is external), and SciELO(link is external) Network agreed to join forces to democratize scientific knowledge following a multicultural, multi-thematic and multi-lingual approach. The Global Alliance of Open Access Scholarly Communication Platforms (GLOALL) was launched with a recognition of the principle that scientific and scholarly knowledge is a global public good essential for the achievement of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. The session directly addressed WSIS action line C3 on Access to Information and Knowledge and action line C7 on E-Science.

In addition to fostering democratization of knowledge generated in ALL places, subjects and languages, the GLOALL carries a vision to promote the development of multilingual scholarly communication standards, products and services. The alliance seeks to enhance operational and subject interoperability in order to strengthen engagement with research worldwide….”

Introducing the new OJS-ORCID plugin | ORCID

The recent launch of version 3.1.2 of PKP‘s Open Journal System (OJS) marks an exciting moment — an upgraded ORCID API plugin! Journals upgrading to OJS 3.1.2 can now request authenticated iDs from both contributing authors and co-authors, and Member API users can assert published works directly to an author’s ORCID record with the author’s permission. All journals that upgrade to the latest version of OJS can benefit from the new features.

Like ORCID, OJS is an open-source, community-driven platform, which benefits from an engaged community of developer contributors. ORCID API support enabling collection of authenticated ORCID iDs was first launched in 2016 with OJS 3.0, through the work of community developers including the University of Pittsburgh. The latest additions were developed by a team of OJS community members in Germany, including Nils Weiher and Dulip Withanage of Heidelberg University (also an ORCID member through the German national consortium)….”