Puzzling Over Interdisciplinary Publishing | ACRLog

“I’m also finding it challenging to find open access journals that fit my interdisciplinary leanings. At this point I’m tenured and not aiming for another promotion, and I’m even more committed to publishing only in open access journals. Open access coverage is highly variable between fields, still. I’ve become so spoiled by the wide range of OA journals in LIS that I’m somewhat shocked when looking for journals in other disciplines. There are lots of fantastic OA options in LIS, but that’s not always the case in other disciplines.

In recent years I’ve begun to wonder whether the journal itself isn’t somewhat of a dinosaur, at least for interdisciplinary work. I use Twitter plus uploading to my university’s institutional repository as my primary means of self-promotion, hoping that the range of scholars who I follow and am followed by will help my work get to anyone who might be interested in it, both inside and outside LIS. In my own research process I rarely read entire issues of scholarly journals anymore, or even table of contents updates, with a few exceptions (that include those journals I regularly peer review for). A journal can be and represent a disciplinary community, but must it always be? There are multiple means of discovery — our usual library databases, social media, the various search engines — for scholarly articles. Is the journal as container for research still the best model, especially if it can’t easily accommodate research that doesn’t fit neatly into disciplinary categories? …”

Future of Open Scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences: Insights from OASPA’s Twitter Chat – OASPA

On July 12th, 2017, OASPA hosted a Twitter chat with Caroline Sutton (Head of Open Scholarship Development at Taylor & Francis and member of the OASPA Board), Rebecca Kennison (Principal of K|N Consultants and the co-founder of the Open Access Network), Dr Jennifer Edmond (Research Fellow and Director of Strategic Projects for the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Trinity College Dublin and co-director of the Trinity Center for Digital Humanities) and Ron Dekker (Director of CESSDA). Our panelists answered questions from the Open Access community and the general public on the future of open scholarship in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and we were lucky to have a lively and wide-ranging discussion

Social-media sites focusing on open access

“+Nicole Contaxis just updated the major social-media lists at the Open Access Directory:

Blogs about OA
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Blogs_about_OA
Twitter feeds about OA
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Social_media_sites_about_OA#Twitter
Google+ sites about OA
http://oad.simmons.edu/oadwiki/Social_media_sites_about_OA#Google.2B
Thanks, Nicole!
If you have a social-media site focusing on OA, and the Open Access Directory doesn’t already list it, please add it. The Open Access Directory <oad.simmons.edu> is a wiki and depends on the OA community to keep it current and comprehensive. To limit spam, editing is limited to registered users, but registration is free and easy.”