Survey of Academic Library Use of Open Access Materials

“This survey studies how colleges and universities use open access resources as a supplement to or replacement for academic journals and other materials. Although the primary focus of the report is on scholarly publishing, especially academic journals, some questions relate to other information vehicles such as textbooks, audio-visual resources and print books.

As a response to the COVID crisis many colleges and universities are turning to open access resources and this report gives highly detailed data on the extent of use of a broad range of specific open access resources including but not limited to Google Scholar, Google Books, LOCKSS, the Directory of Open Access Journals, PubMed Central,  arXiv, bioRxiv, MedRxiv, ResearchGate the Directory of Open Access Books, OAPEN, the Online Guide to Open Access Journals, PDQY, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, the Registry of Research Data Repositories, MedEdPortal, the Open Access Directory, OpenDOAR, the Free Music Archive, EBSCO Open Dissertations, Science.Gov, OpenStax, MERLOT, Lumen Learning, the Open Course Library, Boundless and Saylor Academy.

The report also looks at use of interlibrary loan, direct appeals to authors and at pirating sites such as Sci-Hub as ways to fulfill patron demand after subscription cancellations.  The study also gives detailed data on the use of, and perception of the skill level in using, digital object identifiers to track and find open access and other available free or low- cost materials. Study participants also comment on what they are doing to publicize open access resources to their patrons, and what training they are providing in their discovery and use.  

Just a few of the 132-page report’s many findings are that:

37% of those sampled turn to interlibrary loan as their first choice in replacing content to which they have lost access.

The Resource – Open Access Theses and Dissertations – was used very frequently by 5.71% of survey participants and frequently by 20%.

63% of US-based colleges and universities in the sample produced a guidebook, listserv or LibGuide on how to locate and use open access resources.”

Publishing during pandemic: Innovation, collaboration, and change – Smart – 2020 – Learned Publishing – Wiley Online Library

“Following the call from the Wellcome Trust back in January, many (if not most) publishers responded positively by making relevant content available for researchers. Subscription publishers, such as Springer Nature, made all articles related to COVID?19 free to view. Others, like Emerald, made funds available to cover the APCs of topical articles which their open access journals chose to publish. EDP sciences and Berghahn Journals made all their content freely available – not just articles relating to the pandemic but their entire portfolios (where they had permission) in order to support researchers working from home without on?campus access to their institutional holdings. In China, the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) provided free access to COVID?19 resources, including research papers that had English abstracts.

Cross?publisher initiatives were also a positive outcome in the recent months. For example, with the agreement of several publishers, ReadCube launched a programme to facilitate free access to research on COVID?19 for researchers, journalists, health workers, and others. Upon registration users can gain access to publications from various publishers, including Springer Nature, JAMA, and Wiley.

And many other organizations also provided support where they could, for example, Kudos provided free access to its premium service, Kudos Pro, which received over 5,000 sign?ups. Publishing platforms also had to deal with variable workloads, such as HighWire reporting a sevenfold surge in the use of its systems (largely driven by the hosting of MedRxiv and BioRxiv, with some articles receiving over 4 million page views). For many organizations, this meant meeting unprecedented demand alongside staff needing to work remotely while maintaining contact with colleagues and systems….”

Supporting Resource Sharing during COVID-19 with IFLA

“If your library’s ability to do resource sharing (i.e. ILL or document delivery) has been impacted by COVID-19, help is at hand. Interlibrary loan professionals at non-profit institutions can head to rscvd.org and volunteer librarians around the world will help to supply materials.

If you’re not having trouble filling requests, fantastic! We would appreciate your help in joining other incredible librarians who’ve volunteered to assist in filling the more than 850 requests we’ve been sent in just the past week.

The service, called “Resource Sharing during COVID-19” (or RSCVD for short, pronounced “received”), was started by IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource Sharing (DDRS) Standing Committee in response to COVID-19’s impact on resource sharing. With library buildings being closed and many services moved fully online, often resource sharing activities have become either impossible or very difficult for many libraries. This all comes at a time when users’ information needs have often increased….”

Supporting Resource Sharing during COVID-19 with IFLA

“If your library’s ability to do resource sharing (i.e. ILL or document delivery) has been impacted by COVID-19, help is at hand. Interlibrary loan professionals at non-profit institutions can head to rscvd.org and volunteer librarians around the world will help to supply materials.

If you’re not having trouble filling requests, fantastic! We would appreciate your help in joining other incredible librarians who’ve volunteered to assist in filling the more than 850 requests we’ve been sent in just the past week.

The service, called “Resource Sharing during COVID-19” (or RSCVD for short, pronounced “received”), was started by IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource Sharing (DDRS) Standing Committee in response to COVID-19’s impact on resource sharing. With library buildings being closed and many services moved fully online, often resource sharing activities have become either impossible or very difficult for many libraries. This all comes at a time when users’ information needs have often increased….”

Resource Sharing during COVID-19 (RSCVD) | Interlibrary loan professionals in not-for-profit libraries can request access to materials from volunteering libraries.

“We accept requests for any textual materials which can be delivered electronically. As many libraries are physically closed, the Lending libraries will find available electronic resources and will supply you as far as their usage licenses allow….

We are using the OCLC Article Exchange Service. It is a free service for those who requested/ordered materials. When the item is ready, you will receive an email with a link to the PDF file and password to access it. The file can be downloaded three times and will be on the server for 30 days….

The service is free of charge for borrowing libraries since this is a temporary project run by volunteering librarians and institutions….”

 

Resource Sharing during COVID-19 (RSCVD) | Interlibrary loan professionals in not-for-profit libraries can request access to materials from volunteering libraries.

“We accept requests for any textual materials which can be delivered electronically. As many libraries are physically closed, the Lending libraries will find available electronic resources and will supply you as far as their usage licenses allow….

We are using the OCLC Article Exchange Service. It is a free service for those who requested/ordered materials. When the item is ready, you will receive an email with a link to the PDF file and password to access it. The file can be downloaded three times and will be on the server for 30 days….

The service is free of charge for borrowing libraries since this is a temporary project run by volunteering librarians and institutions….”

 

The Impact of Big Deal Breaks on Library Consortia: An Exploratory Case Study: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  This study examines the impact of Big Deal breaks on statewide resource sharing. An analysis within VIVA (Virginia’s academic library consortium) for Big Deal publishers showed significant lending of one publisher with low levels of statewide holdings. A closer examination of an individual institution with the most recent cancellations of this publisher’s content showed high levels of fulfillment from lending partners outside the consortium. As more groups cancel Big Deals, consideration for alternative access will be increasingly important, and understanding the resource sharing environment should inform a cooperative approach to journal acquisitions in order to minimize negative impacts on researchers.

 

Plan S does the wrong things to the wrong people | Times Higher Education (THE)

“However, publishing in a hybrid journal that doesn’t commit to that transition will still be banned – regardless of how appropriate a publication venue it might be – unless the paper is also made immediately available in an online repository. UKRI is inviting views on the hybrid ban, and its policy will come into force a year later than Plan S, but it is committed to insisting on immediate open access.

While I understand the concept that open science has more impact, I’m not sure that the reality quite matches the theory. I am yet to meet a researcher who says that access to articles is a big problem for them given the possibility of interlibrary loans.

So who benefits from Plan S’ massive change? The general public? Researchers in other countries with less access? Possibly. The trouble is that Plan S leaves academics like me trapped in the middle, between the funders and the journals – many of which say they will struggle to be compliant with Plan S. If the hybrid ban is adopted, we will be unable to publish research council-funded work in high-quality journals in subjects such as chemistry unless we pay the costs personally or institutionally….”

InstantILL is being rolled out at IUPUI. Here’s how it works.

“In March, we announced InstantILL, a new, powerfully simple library tool that delivers articles?—?no subscription needed. Since then, over 250 libraries, of all sizes have joined the waiting list to save money, improve services, and advance Open. Today, we’re debuting the first iteration with our partner, IUPUI University Library.

We’re excited to show you how it works, but, if you haven’t read our announcement, we suggest you take a few minutes to do that first and join the waiting list if you’d like to stay up to date and explore bringing InstantILL to your campus.

InstantILL is a next-generation interlibrary loan form that integrates with and complements systems that you already use to improve services, save money, and accelerate Open Access. InstantILL embeds into your website and turns your interlibrary loan form into one simple place where patrons can get legal access to any article through the library. InstantILL checks Open Access availability and uses your existing systems to check your subscriptions and submit ILL requests for an article….

If there is an Open Access copy, which can be 23% of the time, and the library doesn’t subscribe to the work, we’ll use the Open Access Button API to give immediate access alongside clear instructions on how it can and can’t be used, and the option to submit an ILL….”