Supporting Resource Sharing during COVID-19 with IFLA

“If your library’s ability to do resource sharing (i.e. ILL or document delivery) has been impacted by COVID-19, help is at hand. Interlibrary loan professionals at non-profit institutions can head to rscvd.org and volunteer librarians around the world will help to supply materials.

If you’re not having trouble filling requests, fantastic! We would appreciate your help in joining other incredible librarians who’ve volunteered to assist in filling the more than 850 requests we’ve been sent in just the past week.

The service, called “Resource Sharing during COVID-19” (or RSCVD for short, pronounced “received”), was started by IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource Sharing (DDRS) Standing Committee in response to COVID-19’s impact on resource sharing. With library buildings being closed and many services moved fully online, often resource sharing activities have become either impossible or very difficult for many libraries. This all comes at a time when users’ information needs have often increased….”

Supporting Resource Sharing during COVID-19 with IFLA

“If your library’s ability to do resource sharing (i.e. ILL or document delivery) has been impacted by COVID-19, help is at hand. Interlibrary loan professionals at non-profit institutions can head to rscvd.org and volunteer librarians around the world will help to supply materials.

If you’re not having trouble filling requests, fantastic! We would appreciate your help in joining other incredible librarians who’ve volunteered to assist in filling the more than 850 requests we’ve been sent in just the past week.

The service, called “Resource Sharing during COVID-19” (or RSCVD for short, pronounced “received”), was started by IFLA’s Document Delivery and Resource Sharing (DDRS) Standing Committee in response to COVID-19’s impact on resource sharing. With library buildings being closed and many services moved fully online, often resource sharing activities have become either impossible or very difficult for many libraries. This all comes at a time when users’ information needs have often increased….”

Resource Sharing during COVID-19 (RSCVD) | Interlibrary loan professionals in not-for-profit libraries can request access to materials from volunteering libraries.

“We accept requests for any textual materials which can be delivered electronically. As many libraries are physically closed, the Lending libraries will find available electronic resources and will supply you as far as their usage licenses allow….

We are using the OCLC Article Exchange Service. It is a free service for those who requested/ordered materials. When the item is ready, you will receive an email with a link to the PDF file and password to access it. The file can be downloaded three times and will be on the server for 30 days….

The service is free of charge for borrowing libraries since this is a temporary project run by volunteering librarians and institutions….”

 

Resource Sharing during COVID-19 (RSCVD) | Interlibrary loan professionals in not-for-profit libraries can request access to materials from volunteering libraries.

“We accept requests for any textual materials which can be delivered electronically. As many libraries are physically closed, the Lending libraries will find available electronic resources and will supply you as far as their usage licenses allow….

We are using the OCLC Article Exchange Service. It is a free service for those who requested/ordered materials. When the item is ready, you will receive an email with a link to the PDF file and password to access it. The file can be downloaded three times and will be on the server for 30 days….

The service is free of charge for borrowing libraries since this is a temporary project run by volunteering librarians and institutions….”

 

The Impact of Big Deal Breaks on Library Consortia: An Exploratory Case Study: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  This study examines the impact of Big Deal breaks on statewide resource sharing. An analysis within VIVA (Virginia’s academic library consortium) for Big Deal publishers showed significant lending of one publisher with low levels of statewide holdings. A closer examination of an individual institution with the most recent cancellations of this publisher’s content showed high levels of fulfillment from lending partners outside the consortium. As more groups cancel Big Deals, consideration for alternative access will be increasingly important, and understanding the resource sharing environment should inform a cooperative approach to journal acquisitions in order to minimize negative impacts on researchers.

 

Plan S does the wrong things to the wrong people | Times Higher Education (THE)

“However, publishing in a hybrid journal that doesn’t commit to that transition will still be banned – regardless of how appropriate a publication venue it might be – unless the paper is also made immediately available in an online repository. UKRI is inviting views on the hybrid ban, and its policy will come into force a year later than Plan S, but it is committed to insisting on immediate open access.

While I understand the concept that open science has more impact, I’m not sure that the reality quite matches the theory. I am yet to meet a researcher who says that access to articles is a big problem for them given the possibility of interlibrary loans.

So who benefits from Plan S’ massive change? The general public? Researchers in other countries with less access? Possibly. The trouble is that Plan S leaves academics like me trapped in the middle, between the funders and the journals – many of which say they will struggle to be compliant with Plan S. If the hybrid ban is adopted, we will be unable to publish research council-funded work in high-quality journals in subjects such as chemistry unless we pay the costs personally or institutionally….”

InstantILL is being rolled out at IUPUI. Here’s how it works.

“In March, we announced InstantILL, a new, powerfully simple library tool that delivers articles?—?no subscription needed. Since then, over 250 libraries, of all sizes have joined the waiting list to save money, improve services, and advance Open. Today, we’re debuting the first iteration with our partner, IUPUI University Library.

We’re excited to show you how it works, but, if you haven’t read our announcement, we suggest you take a few minutes to do that first and join the waiting list if you’d like to stay up to date and explore bringing InstantILL to your campus.

InstantILL is a next-generation interlibrary loan form that integrates with and complements systems that you already use to improve services, save money, and accelerate Open Access. InstantILL embeds into your website and turns your interlibrary loan form into one simple place where patrons can get legal access to any article through the library. InstantILL checks Open Access availability and uses your existing systems to check your subscriptions and submit ILL requests for an article….

If there is an Open Access copy, which can be 23% of the time, and the library doesn’t subscribe to the work, we’ll use the Open Access Button API to give immediate access alongside clear instructions on how it can and can’t be used, and the option to submit an ILL….”

UW Faculty Senate votes to support UW Libraries bargaining and licensing priorities in scholarly journal subscription negotiations — UW Libraries

On May 16, the UW Faculty Senate voted unanimously to approve a Class C Resolution expressing its support for the UW Libraries Licensing Principles and bargaining priorities in upcoming journal package negotiations with major journal publishers. The legislation, sponsored by the Faculty Council on University Libraries, endorses the Libraries’ negotiation and licensing priorities and voices support for:

  • Bringing down subscription costs and increases to a sustainable level that will not imperil other collection and service needs
  • Ending non-disclosure agreements to allow the Libraries to disclose their contractual terms and permit greater market transparency
  • Allowing interlibrary loan to facilitate resource sharing
  • Protecting the rights of users to share articles with students and colleagues
  • Ensuring the privacy and data security of all users
  • Protecting the ability of students and researchers to continue to access journals and articles
  • Supporting the University’s Open Access policies by allowing re-use and embargo-free deposit rights and protecting researchers’ copyright in their own research
  • Enabling greater market flexibility and responsiveness by negotiating contracts on a 3-year basis
  • Providing equitable service and access to information for all our library users….”

Living in Denial: The Relationship between Access Denied Turnaways and ILL Requests: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Access denied turnaway statistics are provided to libraries to help with serials collection development, but very little research about turnaways is available. This article examines the relationship between access denied turnaways and interlibrary loan (ILL) requests at one institution in an attempt to deepen our understanding of turnaways. The study showed that there is a moderate correlation with an overall ILL requests to turnaways ratio of 11.4%. The strength of the relationship and the ILL requests to turnaways ratio do vary depending on the publisher/provider. The article also discusses potential explanations and implications as related to the relationship.”

No Big Deal | Library Babel Fish

“While our system is dandy for finding things we’re not allowed to share, it’s not always great at discovering open access materials. Quite often, an open access publication listed in a database or a book in the catalog will fail to link to the item, and that confuses students. The behind-the-scenes work that has to go into making things connect from one database to another or from a catalog to an electronic source is complex, and it may seem silly to worry about cataloging something that can be found with a Google search – but if our shared catalogs lead to things we can’t borrow but fail to find open access books, we’re really dropping the ball….”