Copyright & Open Access for GLAMs in the age of COVID-19

“The current global health emergency forced libraries and museums to organize digital engagement strategies, from #MuseumsFromHome to making digital broadcasts. However, this doesn’t mean that copyright laws have been suspended from working: how do we deal with copyright in this public health emergency? What are the important things we need to be looking at when we make our digital engagement strategies? Where can we go to find openly available content from museums and libraries? How do we make sure that we can legally preserve some of the current records being created by these digital engagement strategies?…”

Stuck at home? View cultural heritage collections online – Open Objects

“With people self-isolating to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, parents and educators (as well as people looking for an art or history fix) may be looking to replace in-person trips to galleries, libraries, archives and museums* with online access to images of artefacts and information about them. GLAMs have spent decades getting some of the collections digitised and online so that you can view items and information from home….”

Stuck at home? View cultural heritage collections online – Open Objects

“With people self-isolating to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic, parents and educators (as well as people looking for an art or history fix) may be looking to replace in-person trips to galleries, libraries, archives and museums* with online access to images of artefacts and information about them. GLAMs have spent decades getting some of the collections digitised and online so that you can view items and information from home….”

PHAROS: A digital research space for photo archives | Art Libraries Journal | Cambridge Core

Abstract:  The PHAROS consortium of fourteen international art historical photo archives is digitizing the over 20 million images (with accompanying documentation) in its combined collections and has begun to construct a common access platform using Linked Open Data and the ResearchSpace software. In addition to resulting in a rich and substantial database of images for art-historical research, the PHAROS initiative supports the development of shared standards for mapping and sharing photo archive metadata, as well as for best practices for working with large digital image collections and conducting computational image analysis. Moreover, alongside their digitization efforts, PHAROS member institutions are considering the kinds of art-historical questions the resulting database of images could be used to research. This article indicates some of the prospective research directions stimulated by modern technologies, with the aim of exploring the epistemological potential of photographic archives and challenging the boundaries between the analogue and the digital.

 

LYRASIS 2020 Open Content Survey

“This survey is intended to offer LYRASIS members and participants in the broader GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums) community a new perspective on how our institutions participate in the open content movement. For the purposes of this survey, “open content” refers, at the most general level, to information that can be read/accessed without any barriers, be they paywalls or institutional logins. For the purposes of this survey we will not go beyond that definition, although many “open content” initiatives also require the ability to reuse the content for a wide range of purposes.

 

We appreciate your taking the time to answer this survey in order to achieve the broadest possible response from GLAM institutions of all shapes and sizes.

 

The survey is divided into three sections concerning three different types of open content: Open access scholarship, open data, and open educational resources. Most survey respondents will only be responsible for one or two of these areas within their institution. For any areas that you are not responsible for, please indicate “no” in the survey question, and you will be taken to the next section of the survey. Please feel free to share the survey with your colleagues for questions outside your job duties. We realize multiple responses from one institution may be necessary….”

Digitisation is putting the world’s greatest works within reach

“One of the greatest changes in the art world in recent years won’t be seen in galleries because it is happening online. Digitisation programs have accelerated in the past five years and most state art institutions now have more than half of their collections online, changing the way we approach art and rapidly turning the world into a virtual gallery.

BBy the end of this year, Art UK, a cultural resource founded in 2003, will have completed a photographic catalogue of every piece of publicly owned painting and sculpture in Britain.

At home, meanwhile, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) now has 92 per cent of its collection online (up from just 11 per cent in 2014). The National Gallery of Australia has digitised 60 per cent and the National Museum of Australia 68 per cent of their collections.

These numbers are still dwarfed by the big international aggregation sites that helped foster the global digitisation of visual culture – Wikimedia Commons, Europeana and to a lesser extent Google Arts & Culture. But governments and state institutions are now finishing the task of hanging the world’s art online….”

Digitisation is putting the world’s greatest works within reach

“One of the greatest changes in the art world in recent years won’t be seen in galleries because it is happening online. Digitisation programs have accelerated in the past five years and most state art institutions now have more than half of their collections online, changing the way we approach art and rapidly turning the world into a virtual gallery.

BBy the end of this year, Art UK, a cultural resource founded in 2003, will have completed a photographic catalogue of every piece of publicly owned painting and sculpture in Britain.

At home, meanwhile, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) now has 92 per cent of its collection online (up from just 11 per cent in 2014). The National Gallery of Australia has digitised 60 per cent and the National Museum of Australia 68 per cent of their collections.

These numbers are still dwarfed by the big international aggregation sites that helped foster the global digitisation of visual culture – Wikimedia Commons, Europeana and to a lesser extent Google Arts & Culture. But governments and state institutions are now finishing the task of hanging the world’s art online….”

The First Anniversary of CMA Open Access: Benefiting People Now and Forever

“It’s hard to believe a year has passed since the Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) launched its Open Access program. On January 23, 2019, the CMA released high-resolution images of all its public-domain artworks, as well as collections information (metadata) for more than 61,000 art objects — both those in the public domain and those with copyright restrictions — with the Creative Commons Zero (CC0) Public Domain Dedication. The museum’s director and president, William M. Griswold, offered remarks on the occasion that emphasized Open Access as an essential way to fulfill the museum’s mission in the 21st century. The CMA’s commitment to Open Access is ongoing. To the more than 31,000 images released at the launch, the museum added 258 artworks on January 1, 2020, and will do so every year going forward as works enter the public domain….”

Keeping digitised works in the public domain: how the copyright directive makes it a reality | Europeana Pro

“The principle that works in the public domain should remain in the public domain once digitised, which Europeana has defended for almost ten years, was recently incorporated into European law. In this post, we interview Andrea Wallace, Lecturer in Law at the University of Exeter, about the importance of this provision for the cultural heritage sector and her research on Article 14….”

14 Paris Museums Put 300,000 Works of Art Online: Download Classics by Monet, Cézanne & More | Open Culture

“First trips to Paris all run the same risk: that of the museums consuming all of one’s time in the city. What those new to Paris need is a museum-going strategy, not that one size will fit all. Tailoring such a strategy to one’s own interests and pursuits requires a sense of each museum’s collection, something difficult to attain remotely before Paris Musées opened up its online collections portal….”