The Magic That Happens When Designers Get Open Access to Art – Shapeways Magazine

“Earlier this year we announced a unique design partnership with the National Gallery of Denmark (known to those in the know as the SMK). The SMK is a leader in the OpenGLAM (Open Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums) movement and has made a huge amount of its art collection — pieces old enough to be in the public domain — available to the public without copyright restrictions. We partnered with the SMK to invite the Shapeways design community to create new pieces of jewelry based on six artworks selected by SMK curators. One winner and four runners up would be featured in the SMK itself, and other entries would be featured in SMK’s online shop.”

Breaking With Its Secluded Past, the Barnes Foundation Makes Half Its Art Collection Available Online

“The art collection at Philadelphia’s Barnes Foundation just got a little easier to see. The museum has announced a new Open Access program that will provide unprecedented access to its holdings by publishing over half of its objects online. Best known for its Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works, the museum’s holdings also include early Modern paintings, Old Masters, Native American fine crafts, and early American furniture and decorative art. Now, thanks to Open Access, 2,081 of the Barnes’s 4,021 objects have been published online. Of those, there are high-resolution images of 1,429 works available for download in the public domain”.

Digital Public Library of America » Blog Archive » John S. Bracken to head Digital Public Library of America

“The Digital Public Library of America is pleased to announce that John S. Bracken has been selected to be the next Executive Director of DPLA, beginning December 4, 2017. A demonstrated leader in the field of digital innovation with nearly two decades of experience at philanthropic foundations, Bracken will lead DPLA in its next chapter of development, as the organization embarks upon its fifth year of operation….Bracken joins DPLA from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, where he is vice president, technology innovation. He previously directed Knight’s journalism and media innovation program, before becoming vice president, media innovation. In these roles, he oversaw $100 million of technology funding, facilitated initiatives to enhance museum technology and library innovation, and supported projects to improve the creation, sharing, and use of information. Bracken also supervised the Knight News Challenge and the Knight Prototype Fund and helped to create a $27 million fund on artificial intelligence and ethics….”

Welcome to Louisiana Digital Library | Louisiana Digital Library

“The Louisiana Digital Library (LDL) is an online library of more than 144,000 digital items from Louisiana archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories, making unique historical treasure accessible to students, researchers, and the general public in Louisiana and across the globe. The items in the Louisiana Digital Library are as diverse and interesting as the people and places in Louisiana, with photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, oral histories, and more documenting the state’s history and culture….”

New platform for Louisiana Digital Library | LSU Libraries News & Notes

“The LSU Libraries has developed a new online platform for the Louisiana Digital Library (LDL). Based on the open-source Islandora digital library software, the LSU Libraries Technology Initiatives team developed the updates to include enhanced features, allowing for greater access and discovery to the 171 collections of the LDL. Patrons can now enjoy the large image viewer with zoom capabilities, full text searching within documents, side-by-side viewing options for audio and text transcriptions, and easy mobile access….Seventeen institutions currently contribute photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, oral histories, and more that document history and culture to the LDL. The LDL is managed by the Louisiana Digital Consortium (LDC), which consists of libraries, museums, archives, historical groups, and other institutions across Louisiana….”

National Digital Platform

“The national digital platform is a way of thinking about and approaching the digital capability and capacity of libraries and museums across the US. In this sense, it is the combination of software applications, social and technical infrastructure, and staff expertise that provide digital content, collections, and related services to users in the US.

As libraries and museums increasingly use digital infrastructure to provide access to digital content and resources, there are more and more opportunities for collaboration around the tools and services that they use to meet their users’ needs. It is possible for each library and museum in the country to leverage and benefit from the work of other organizations in shared digital services, systems, and infrastructure….”

“Something Old, Something New , Something Bold, Something Cool: A Marriage of Two Repositories” by Carol Ann Davis and Jason Boczar

Abstract: “For the past several years, many libraries have been developing institutional repositories to house their open access publishing efforts to both showcase and preserve their faculty’s research. Some of those same libraries have been building sizable digital collections, often built from digitized versions of materials in their special collections. So what happens when you put these two groups together? The University of South Florida Tampa Library did exactly that by creating a new Digital Scholarship Services unit. The union of these two groups has created new synergies between staff in complementary areas of the library, as we combine unique skill sets from each group to offer new services to the faculty. This presentation will discuss why this change was made, examine some of the benefits and growing pains of this change, and showcase some of the unusual projects that have resulted. For example, a group of faculty from the College of Education has a multimodal project featuring new methodological approaches for analyzing various formats such as websites, images, and film. The library also has two research associates who are archaeologists creating three dimensional representations of artifacts for cultural heritage preservation that are now embedded with metadata in the repository. Creating such collections not only highlights the university’s work but provides materials professors can use to enhance their course curricula and use technology to engage students in new and innovative ways.”

Recording the past and the future in 3-D: News at IU: Indiana University

“The handheld scanner looks like an old-school video game controller, a clunky throwback to the early days of Atari. But these mobile 3-D scanners used by the staff in the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library Center for Digital Scholarship are actually very advanced technology, and they are changing the way we record recent history, ancient history and even the future….Proving its place at the front of the 3-D digital archiving crowd, the Center for Digital Scholarship recently received a grant from LYRASIS — a nonprofit organization for information professionals — to develop standards for how digital archives are recorded….”