OpenGLAM

“The OpenGLAM initiative is currently working on a modern set of principles and values on Open Access for Cultural Heritage. We expect to draft a Declaration that outlines the rationales behind open access policy adoptions, acknowledges different cultural backgrounds, and addresses ethical and privacy considerations to help promote the adoption of open policies by a broader set of organizations around the world.

By February 2020 we will release a green paper focusing on the legal foundations of open access for cultural heritage, and examining some of the broader questions around copyright and open licensing, traditional knowledge, ethical and privacy concerns, and technical standards for open access. Following a consultation period, we plan to publish a final version of that paper and make the official launch of the Declaration on Open Access for Cultural Heritage by 2020. If you would like to get involved, please write to us at info [at] openglam.org….”

Job Application for Senior Program Manager, GLAM and Culture at Wikimedia Foundation

“The Wikimedia Foundation is seeking a Senior Program Manager, GLAM and Culture, to advance the Wikimedia movement’s vision of every human being able to freely share in the sum of all knowledge; as well as its strategic direction, which states that by 2030, Wikimedia will become the essential infrastructure of the ecosystem of free knowledge, and anyone who shares our vision will be able to join us….”

Open cultural heritage collections & institutions by digital means: A webinar series

“Open GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives & museums) is an international movement around open cultural heritage data. This webinar series is focusing on how museums and other cultural heritage institutions can open up towards their audiences with the help of digital data and media. The aim is that visitors can use data and become active participants within the institution. Both Swedish and international speakers present their work in the context of digital cultural heritage data. Have a look at the program to discover more!

This series is based on the aspects:

Museum and cultural heritage institution staff members, as well as the interested public (such as students), will have the chance to exchange thoughts on digital openness in the sector and discuss ideas and examples.
An important aspect of the series is the assumption that digital openness in museums and cultural heritage institutions is a perspective: Institutions can strive towards digital openness, but this means constant work – with changing technologies and shifting standards. This also means that every kind of institution can take part in this series, small or large, beginners or advanced participants in the open GLAM discussion. Everyone should be able to talk frankly about successful and failed digital activities – so others can learn from those experiences.
As this is a webinar series, everyone can take part from their desk. Especially small institutions do not always have the resources to participate in conferences and – as a result – important discussions. This is also a possibility for more diverse discussions on digital openness in the sector….”

2019:GLAM/Public Domain Awareness Project: enhancing use of CC’s Public Domain tools to serve the needs of GLAM institutions and reusers – Wikimania

“Making assessments about the copyright status of a work remains a challenge notwithstanding the tools that CC has developed over the years, such as the Public Domain Mark and CC0. It is also hard to communicate to end users about the laws that apply to their particular use of a work. Copyright is jurisdiction based, which means each country has their own copyright and public domain rules. These differing laws presents challenges for digitizers of content and reusers of digital online surrogates.

Several efforts and projects offer partial solutions for these challenges; however they tend to serve single jurisdiction or regional needs, are loosely coordinated, and are not integrated into a unified solution that works starting from the moment of digitization and continuing through to the public that encounters them over the Internet. Ideally, the public domain is the easiest part of the knowledge commons to assess and reuse, but the current environment makes it challenging at each stage in the process of getting that content to a public.

Creative Commons and other key stakeholders such as Wikimedia brought forth this Project for initial discussion with our community and stakeholders at the CC 2019 Global Summit in Lisbon. The outcomes of the 4 hours session at the Summit can be found here.

At this session, we expect to be able to follow on some of the data modelling challenges in relationship with the Help:Copyrights page on Wikidata. We want to gather feedback and input from the community that is working in the intersection of GLAM institutions and Wikidata.

Creative Commons will bring some of its legal expertise on copyright and open licensing, and we expect to engage more with the Wikidata community to leverage the different languages and community needs, and better refine our initial project….”

Open Access 2.0: Rethinking Open Access

“The open access movement has empowered museums to connect with their audiences by providing unprecedented access to digital collections. Now that a number of museums have had an open access policy for the better part of a decade, how have their policies stood the test of time? How have their policies made an impact on their institutions and communities? Have standards of “openness” changed? How can policies be updated to address changes in community practice? What lessons can those still advocating for an initial open access policy at their institution learn from early innovators? Representatives from several museums with open access policies will share how their policies are evolving and lessons learned from their experiences implementing open access, and a representative from Creative Commons will give an update on the work the OpenGLAM community is doing to support open access policies….Key Outcomes: After attending this session, participants from institutions with open access policies will be ready to review their policies for areas that may need updating. Participants who are still lobbying for open access at their museum will come away with strategies for gaining institutional support for open access and crafting a policy that reflects current practice.”

As technology like AI propels us into the future, it can also play an important role in preserving our past – Microsoft on the Issues

“Our new AI for Cultural Heritage program will use artificial intelligence to work with nonprofits, universities and governments around the world to help preserve the languages we speak, the places we live and the artifacts we treasure. It will build on recent work we’ve pursued using various aspect of AI in each of these areas, such as:

  • Work in New York , where we have collaborated with The Metropolitan Museum of Art and MIT to explore ways in which AI can make The Met’s Open Access collection accessible, discoverable and useful to the 3.9 billion internet-connected people worldwide.
  • Work in Paris at the Musée des Plans-Reliefs, where we have partnered with two French companies, HoloForge Interactive and Iconem, to create an entirely new museum experience with mixed reality and AI that paid homage to Mont-Saint-Michel, a French cultural icon off the coast of Normandy.
  • And in southwestern Mexico, where we’re engaged as part of our ongoing efforts to preserve languages around the world to capture and translate Yucatec Maya and Querétaro Otomiusing AI to make them more accessible to people around the world….”

An International Knowledge Base for all Heritage Institutions (Part 1*) – SocietyByte

Heritage institutions are places in which works of art, historical records, and other objects of cultural or scientific interest are sheltered and made accessible to the public. The equivalent of that in the digital world, is already taking shape, through digitization and sharing of digital-born or digitized objects on online platforms. In this article we shed light on how the issue of structured data about heritage institutions is being tackled by Wikipedia, and its sister Wikidata, through their “Sum of All GLAM” project.[1].

Access to these objects, and information about them, is provided and mediated both through platforms maintained by the heritage sector itself and through more general-purpose platforms, which often serve as a first point of entry for the wider public. These platforms include Google, Facebook, YouTube, and Wikipedia, which also happen to be among the most visited websites on the Web. In this emerging data and platform ecosystem, Wikipedia and related Wikimedia projects play a special role as they are community-driven, non-profit endeavours. Moreover, these projects are working hard to make data and information available in a free, connected and structured manner, for anybody to re-use.

There are various layers of information about heritage institutions, ranging from descriptions of institutions themselves and descriptions of their collections, to descriptions of individual items. There may be digital representations of these items, and in some cases even searchable content within the items. Figure 1 illustrates how the top four layers of data and information are currently addressed in Wikipedia, with Wikidata and Wikimedia Commons increasingly focussing on providing structured and linked data alongside the unstructured or semi-structured encyclopaedic information contained in Wikipedia articles….”

Explainer: What will the new EU copyright rules change for Europe’s Cultural Heritage Institutions | Europeana Pro

“On 17 May 2019 the Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market was published in the Official Journal of the European Union. Member States have until the 7 June 2021 to implement the new rules into national law.  In this explainer, Paul Keller, Policy Advisor to Europeana Foundation breaks down the changes these new rules bring to Europe’s Cultural Heritiage insitutions. …

Article 14 of the directive clarifies a fundamental principle of EU copyright law. The article makes it clear that “when the term of protection of a work of visual art has expired, any material resulting from an act of reproduction of that work is not subject to copyright or related rights, unless the material resulting from that act of reproduction is original”. In other words, the directive establishes that museums and other cultural heritage institutions can no longer claim copyright over (digital) reproductions of public domain works in their collections. In doing so the article settles an issue that has sparked quite some controversy in the the cultural heritage sector in the past few year and aligns the EU copyright rules with the principles expressed in Europeana’s Public Domain Charter….

Finally the DSM directive introduces not one but two new Text and Data Mining exceptions (Articles 3 & 4) that will need to be implemented by all Member States. The first exception (Article 3) allows “research organisations and cultural heritage institutions” to make extractions and reproductions of copyright protected works to which they have lawful access “in order to carry out, for the purposes of scientific research, Text and Data Mining”. Under this exception cultural heritage institutions can text and data mine all works that the have in their collections (or to which they have lawful access via other means) as long as this happens for the purpose of scientific research. 

The second exception (Article 4) is not limited to Text and Data Mining for the purpose of scientific research. Instead it allows anyone (including cultural heritage institutions) to make reproductions or extractions of works to which they have lawful access for Text and Data Mining regardless of the underlying purpose. …”