If Open is the Answer, What Was the Question? | MIT Open Learning

“For 148 years, The Metropolitan Museum of Art has been connecting audiences to knowledge, creativity, and ideas through the 5,000 years of human history represented by The Met’s global collection. For the vast majority of those years, this mission-serving work was concentrated to within the walls of the museum’s Manhattan venues. Digital, and the digitization of collections, changed that.

Over the last decade, The Met has developed an ambitious digital program whose goal is to extend the reach and relevance of The Met collection to a global audience. One of the most significant milestones in the development of this program was the museum’s decision, in 2017, make all high-resolution images – approximately 375,000 images – of public-domain artworks available for users to use, share, mix and remix unrestricted, under CC0 (Creative Commons).

In this xTalk, Loic Tallon will review the reasoning for that decision, the impacts of it, and the larger role of open content in helping The Met become one of the most accessible and relevant cultural voices for the world and in the world….”

Free to Use and Reuse Sets  |  Library of Congress

This page features items from the Library’s digital collections that are free to use and reuse. The Library believes that this content is either in the public domain, has no known copyright, or has been cleared by the copyright owner for public use. Each set of content is based on a theme and is first featured on the Library’s home page.

These sets are just a small sample of the Library’s digital collections that are free to use and reuse. The digital collections comprise millions of items including books, newspapers, manuscripts, prints and photos, maps, musical scores, films, sound recordings and more. Whenever possible, each collection has its own rights statement which should be consulted for guidance on use. Learn more about copyright and the Library’s collections….”

Inventor says Google is patenting work he put in the public domain | Ars Technica

“When Jarek Duda invented an important new compression technique called asymmetric numeral systems (ANS) a few years ago, he wanted to make sure it would be available for anyone to use. So instead of seeking patents on the technique, he dedicated it to the public domain. Since 2014, Facebook, Apple, and Google have all created software based on Duda’s breakthrough.

But now Google is seeking a patent that would give it broad rights over the use of ANS for video compression….”

Scanning project makes piano works available | Stanford Libraries

“A pilot project in the Music Library to digitize sheet music and make images available in the SearchWorks catalog has produced its first collection, made up of 140 piano arrangements and transcriptions. Basic records for these items have long been in SearchWorks, and are now greatly enhanced with access to the digital images and options for close examination and download. This collection was chosen for scanning because the paper is too brittle to withstand the handling that results from practice and performance. THe works are also in the public domain, making free, printable, digital files the ideal means of access and preservation….”

What Open means in the face of inequity & inequality – Google Slides

“It’s not only about getting the licensing right — it’s also about overcoming linguistic barriers, put resources in place, build the technical infrastructures that are flexible enough to adapt to diverse contexts”

The Public Domain Manifesto

“The public domain, as we understand it, is the wealth of information that is free from the barriers to access or reuse usually associated with copyright protection, either because it is free from any copyright protection or because the right holders have decided to remove these barriers. It is the raw material from which new knowledge is derived and new cultural works are created.

After decades of measures that have drastically reduced the public domain, typically by extending the terms of protection, it is time to strongly reaffirm how much our societies and economies rely on a vibrant and ever expanding public domain. The role of the public domain, in fact, already crucial in the past, it is even more important today, as the Internet and digital technologies enable us to access, use and re-distribute culture with an ease and a power unforeseeable even just a generation ago. The Public Domain Manifesto aims at reminding citizens and policy-makers of a common wealth that, since it belongs to all, it is often defended by no-one. In a time where we for the first time in history have the tools to enable direct access to most of our shared culture and knowledge it is important that policy makers and citizens strengthen the legal concept that enables free and unrestricted access and reuse….”

Cita Press

“a feminist indie press publishing public-domain books written by women. We make carefully designed books available free in both print and web formats….

cita is a collaborative labor of love between designers and writers that relies on public-domain writings and open-source texts, fonts, code, and images. All the content of cita is either public-domain, or is licensed under Creative Commons License CC-NC-SA 4.0, …”

What Page Are You On? Making Online Texts More Reliable for Teachers and Students | UVA Today

“These older novels, often required reading in survey courses on literature, are in the public domain – and that’s why publishers and companies are racing to put them online without having to worry about copyright law. And while free access is a key component, students are not equipped to evaluate what they are getting.”