Copyright Review Program | www.hathitrust.org | HathiTrust Digital Library

“Each year we invite your continued participation and seek new team members for copyright review projects. 

Typically there will be a call for nominations in September and January each year.  The January 2019 open call has been completed and participants selected for this year.

There was an informational webinar about the Participating in the HathiTrust Copyright Review Program held on September 11, 1:00-2:00pm ET for anyone seeking to learn more about participation.  Slides and recording.

To nominate for a copyright team member position on the US Monographs project you must:

be employed at a HathiTrust member institution
have the support of your institution to contribute 6 hours of regular work time each week for a year
be present at online class training sessions or watch the recorded classes promptly (late Feb-Mar)…”

Copyright Review Program | www.hathitrust.org | HathiTrust Digital Library

“Each year we invite your continued participation and seek new team members for copyright review projects. 

Typically there will be a call for nominations in September and January each year.  The January 2019 open call has been completed and participants selected for this year.

There was an informational webinar about the Participating in the HathiTrust Copyright Review Program held on September 11, 1:00-2:00pm ET for anyone seeking to learn more about participation.  Slides and recording.

To nominate for a copyright team member position on the US Monographs project you must:

be employed at a HathiTrust member institution
have the support of your institution to contribute 6 hours of regular work time each week for a year
be present at online class training sessions or watch the recorded classes promptly (late Feb-Mar)…”

Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain – VICE

“A coalition of archivists, activists, and libraries are working overtime to make it easier to identify the many books that are secretly in the public domain, digitize them, and make them freely available online to everyone. The people behind the effort are now hoping to upload these books to the Internet Archive, one of the largest digital archives on the internet.

As it currently stands, all books published in the U.S. before 1924 are in the public domain, meaning they’re publicly owned and can be freely used and copied. Books published in 1964 and after are still in copyright, and by law will be for 95 years from their publication date.

But a copyright loophole means that up to 75 percent of books published between 1923 to 1964 are secretly in the public domain, meaning they are free to read and copy. The problem is determining which books these are, due to archaic copyright registration systems and convoluted and shifting copyright law….”

Libraries and Archivists Are Scanning and Uploading Books That Are Secretly in the Public Domain – VICE

“A coalition of archivists, activists, and libraries are working overtime to make it easier to identify the many books that are secretly in the public domain, digitize them, and make them freely available online to everyone. The people behind the effort are now hoping to upload these books to the Internet Archive, one of the largest digital archives on the internet.

As it currently stands, all books published in the U.S. before 1924 are in the public domain, meaning they’re publicly owned and can be freely used and copied. Books published in 1964 and after are still in copyright, and by law will be for 95 years from their publication date.

But a copyright loophole means that up to 75 percent of books published between 1923 to 1964 are secretly in the public domain, meaning they are free to read and copy. The problem is determining which books these are, due to archaic copyright registration systems and convoluted and shifting copyright law….”

The In/Visible, In/Audible Labor of Digitizing the Public Domain

Abstract:  In this article I call for more recognition of and scholarly engagement with public, volunteer digital humanities projects, using the example of LibriVox.org to consider what public, sustainable, digital humanities work can look like beyond the contexts of institutional sponsorship. Thousands of volunteers are using LibriVox to collaboratively produce free audiobook versions of texts in the US public domain. The work of finding, selecting, and preparing texts to be digitized and published in audio form is complex and slow, and not all of this labor is ultimately visible, valued, or rewarded. Drawing on an ethnographic study of 12 years of archived discourse and documentation, I interrogate digital traces of the processes by which several LibriVox versions of Anne of Green Gables have come into being, watching for ways in which policies and infrastructure have been influenced by variously visible and invisible forms of work. Making visible the intricate, unique, archived experiences of the crowdsourcing community of LibriVox volunteers and their tools adds to still-emerging discussions about how to value extra-institutional, public, distributed digital humanities work.

2019:GLAM/Public Domain Awareness Project: enhancing use of CC’s Public Domain tools to serve the needs of GLAM institutions and reusers – Wikimania

“Making assessments about the copyright status of a work remains a challenge notwithstanding the tools that CC has developed over the years, such as the Public Domain Mark and CC0. It is also hard to communicate to end users about the laws that apply to their particular use of a work. Copyright is jurisdiction based, which means each country has their own copyright and public domain rules. These differing laws presents challenges for digitizers of content and reusers of digital online surrogates.

Several efforts and projects offer partial solutions for these challenges; however they tend to serve single jurisdiction or regional needs, are loosely coordinated, and are not integrated into a unified solution that works starting from the moment of digitization and continuing through to the public that encounters them over the Internet. Ideally, the public domain is the easiest part of the knowledge commons to assess and reuse, but the current environment makes it challenging at each stage in the process of getting that content to a public.

Creative Commons and other key stakeholders such as Wikimedia brought forth this Project for initial discussion with our community and stakeholders at the CC 2019 Global Summit in Lisbon. The outcomes of the 4 hours session at the Summit can be found here.

At this session, we expect to be able to follow on some of the data modelling challenges in relationship with the Help:Copyrights page on Wikidata. We want to gather feedback and input from the community that is working in the intersection of GLAM institutions and Wikidata.

Creative Commons will bring some of its legal expertise on copyright and open licensing, and we expect to engage more with the Wikidata community to leverage the different languages and community needs, and better refine our initial project….”

Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Freies Wissen: EU-Kommission stellt ihre Publikationen unter offene Lizenzen – netzpolitik.org

From Google’s English: “The EU Commission places its contents under Creative Commons licenses and supports the organization in the translation of license texts. She is thus ahead of the federal government with a good role model….

Since the beginning of this year, many contents and publications of the EU Commission have been standardized under two Creative Commons licenses. Both allow a largely free use of such content, which can now virtually arbitrarily remix, pass on and commercially reuse.

At the end of February, the EU Commission announced that it would place most of the knowledge it produced under a “CC BY 4.0” license . Therefore, everyone is free to share, modify and use such content for any purpose as long as the author is named. For metadata, raw data and “other documents of a similar nature”, the EU Commission even goes one step further and places it under the even more liberal CC public domain license ….”

Where to Download the Millions of Free eBooks that Secretly Entered the Public Domain

“Everyone is paying for books when they don’t have to. There’s so many ways to read almost anything ever published, for free, that it borders on the obscene. Libraries: They’re good! Sure, if you want the latest release from your favorite author you either have to pay or wait for a copy from the library, but for millions of older books, you can get a digital version, legally, for free. One secret of the publishing industry is that most American books published before 1964 never extended their copyright, meaning they’re in the public domain today….”

Where to Download the Millions of Free eBooks that Secretly Entered the Public Domain

“Everyone is paying for books when they don’t have to. There’s so many ways to read almost anything ever published, for free, that it borders on the obscene. Libraries: They’re good! Sure, if you want the latest release from your favorite author you either have to pay or wait for a copy from the library, but for millions of older books, you can get a digital version, legally, for free. One secret of the publishing industry is that most American books published before 1964 never extended their copyright, meaning they’re in the public domain today….”