US Supreme Court’s Decision on Copyrightability of Annotations to Official Code of Georgia: Can It Inspire the Access to Law Movement in India? | SpicyIP

“We are delighted to bring to our readers an insightful post by Dr. Arul George Scaria on the US Supreme Court’s recent decision in Georgia et al., v. Public.Resource.Org holding that annotations to the official code of Georgia are not copyrightable. In this post, he makes a case for the adoption of the government edicts doctrine by Indian courts to foster greater ‘access to law’ in India….”

Comment of the European Copyright Society on the Implementation of Art.14 of the Directive (EU) 2019/790 on Copyright in the Digital Single Market

“Article 14 obliges Member States to “provide that, when the term of protection of a work of visual art has expired, any material resulting from an act of reproduction of that work is not subject to copyright or related rights, unless the material resulting from that act of reproduction is original in the sense that it is the author’s own intellectual creation.” The wording of Article 14 appears, of course, somewhat clumsy in stating that the resulting reproduction “is not subject to copyright …, unless [it] is original in the sense that it is the author’s own intellectual creation” because, on the one hand, in strict copyright terms, a mere reproduction is not an author’s own intellectual creation, and, on the other hand, once an author’s own intellectual creation can be found, copyright protection shall attach according to the very wording of the Article in question. What is, of course, meant is (1) that once the copyright of a work of visual arts has expired, it may not only be reproduced, communicated or used without the author’s consent since it is in the public domain, but that in addition, (2) no exclusive rights shall attach to any copy of a public domain work of art, unless the reproduction constitutes its author’s own intellectual creation. This is a remarkable provision which, for the first time in the EU, grants a positive status to works belonging to the public domain, by prohibiting any regaining of exclusivity therein….”

Supreme Court rules Georgia can’t put the law behind a paywall | Ars Technica

“A narrowly divided US Supreme Court on Monday upheld the right to freely share the official law code of Georgia. The state claimed to own the copyright for the Official Code of Georgia Annotated and sued a nonprofit called Public.Resource.Org for publishing it online. Monday’s ruling is not only a victory for the open-government group, it’s an important precedent that will help secure the right to publish other legally significant public documents….”

SCOTUS Rules No Copyright in Official Annotated State Code | Cyberlaw Clinic

“We’re pleased to report that the United States Supreme Court has sided with Public.Resource.org and held that the Official Code of Georgia Annotated is ineligible for copyright protection. The Cyberlaw Clinic worked with the Caselaw Access Project team at the Harvard Library Innovation Lab on an amicus curiae brief (.pdf) advocating this very result. The brief highlighted the significant burden that would be placed on those creating tools to facilitate access to law if legal materials generated by or at the direction of state government officials were subject to copyright protection and the importance of a bright line holding that official government works are not copyrightable….”

U.S. Supreme Court: Make official Georgia code free to the public

“The state of Georgia’s annotated version of state law cannot be protected under copyright law and sold for more than $400 a copy, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The decision resolves hotly disputed litigation between the state and public records activist Carl Malamud, who had published the code on his Public.Resource.org website. When Georgia insisted he take it down and he refused, the state filed suit and obtained an order from a federal judge directing him to remove it….”

Opinion analysis: Sharply divided bench rejects Georgia’s copyright in annotations of Georgia statutes – SCOTUSblog

“The decision this morning in Georgia v Public.Resource.Org resolves a technical question of copyright law, the extent to which governmental authorities can copyright (and profit from) the materials that they create. The specific question here is the copyrightability of annotations that summarize, but are not part of, the state’s body of enforceable statutes. The opinion of Chief Justice John Roberts for a 5-4 majority holds that the “government edicts” doctrine, long recognized as preventing copyright protection for judicial opinions and statutes, also applies to annotations of those statutes that are prepared at the behest of the legislature. Dissents from Justice Clarence Thomas (joined by Justice Samuel Alito and in large part by Justice Stephen Breyer) and by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (joined by Breyer) would have permitted Georgia to copyright those materials and retain the exclusive right to authorize their sale….”

Georgia Loses Legal Code Copyright Clash at Supreme Court (1)

“Georgia lost a close U.S. Supreme Court case over the state’s ability to copyright its annotated legal code, in a ruling that dissenting justices said would shock states with similar arrangements.

Copyright protection doesn’t extend to the annotations in the state’s official annotated code, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for a 5-4 majority on Monday that crossed ideological lines. Justices Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch, and Brett Kavanaugh joined Roberts….”

AWOL – The Ancient World Online: Loebolus: Open Access to all the public domain Loeb Classical Library volumes

Loebolus is based on Edwin Donnelly’s “Downloebables” , aiming to make all the public domain Loebs more easily downloadable by re-hosting the PDF’s directly, without the need to enter CAPTCHA’s.

You can also download a .zip containing all 277 PDF’s (3.2GB). Or view the code used for generating this site on GitHub….”

AWOL – The Ancient World Online: Loebolus: Open Access to all the public domain Loeb Classical Library volumes

Loebolus is based on Edwin Donnelly’s “Downloebables” , aiming to make all the public domain Loebs more easily downloadable by re-hosting the PDF’s directly, without the need to enter CAPTCHA’s.

You can also download a .zip containing all 277 PDF’s (3.2GB). Or view the code used for generating this site on GitHub….”