Recognition and rewards in the Open Era: Turning thoughts into actions | Open Working

“The TU Delft Open Science programme held its very first thematic session on the Recognition and Rewards cross-cutting theme on October 5, 2020. The Open Science Programme currently has 5 projects and 3 cross-cutting themes, from FAIR software to Open Education. This means that the programme core team is composed of members from many different departments (not only within the Library), bringing in their diverse perspectives and skills! But this also poses a challenge on teamwork- we need a way for us to all stay in touch, be able to see and learn from each other’s work, and contribute and provide feedback – hence the idea of the thematic sessions.Ingrid Vos, the leader of the Recognition and Rewards theme, has kindly volunteered to lead this first thematic session. Since this theme relates to everyone’s work within the Open Science Programme, Ingrid wanted to make sure everyone can be effectively engaged in the session and their voices can be heard – more on this below.Key takeaways: A re-examination of rewards and recognition is needed to further fuel the cultural and behavioural changes towards open science TU Delft’s work in this aspect builds upon VSNU’s “Room for everyone’s talent” position paper. Every university in the Netherlands has a committee on Recognition & Rewards. The TU Delft committee is led by Ena Voûte. The Open Science Programme team had fruitful discussions around open research and education behaviours and “products”, how to evaluate, appreciate and reward these, as well as emerging career paths We’d love to hear your ideas and thoughts, both on rewards and recognition and on how you’d like to contribute and participate in these discussions- please use the comment section of this post!  …”

Open Access Publishing in the EJVES: a Hybrid Solution for a Hybrid Specialty (and How ‘Hybrid’ Helped the Dinosaurs Survive) – European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery

“Scientific publishing in scientific media such as the EJVES faces similar challenges. Funding of publishing mechanisms and accessibility of research findings have become moving targets asking for (hybrid) survival tactics.

Many of our readers may not be aware that the EJVES is already a Hybrid Journal!…

 

Where does the money come from to cover these ‘technical costs’? We have three main income streams. First, individual subscribers: Most are members of the ESVS, or of other vascular surgery societies with a linked membership with the ESVS, such as the Vascular societies of Australia/New Zealand, India, Lebanon or South Africa. Second, institutional subscribers (mainly university libraries): They subscribe to journals on behalf of their associated researchers. Such agreements may be quite complex since hundreds of scientific journals may be involved. Individual journals receive subscription fees, depending, amongst other factors, on the number of published articles and the journal impact factor (JIF). The EJVES 2019 JIF increased by 46% to 5.328,
5
 the 2020 JIF will be released in June 2021.

The third is Open Access publishing. What is this, and who can benefit from it? Under a subscription model, newly published articles are reserved for paying subscribers (individual or institutional, see above). Although all articles are transferred eventually to an open archive, which is free to access (for the EJVES one year after being paper published in a print issue of the journal), contents remain exclusive often for up to the 18 months that may pass between e-publication and transfer to the open archive. Many papers are “hot” and are most interesting when recently published which drives the subscription model and the motivation to become an ESVS member, for example….”

 

Attracting new users or business as usual? A case study of converting academic subscription based journals to open access

Abstract:  This paper studies a selection of eleven Norwegian journals in the humanities and social sciences and their conversion from subscription to open access, a move heavily incentivized by governmental mandates and open access policies. By investigating the journals’ visiting logs in the period 2014-2019, the study finds that a conversion to open access induces higher visiting numbers; all journals in the study had a significant increase which can be attributed to the conversion. Converting a journal had no spillover in terms of increased visits to previously published articles still behind the paywall in the same journals. Visits from previously subscribing Norwegian higher education institutions did not account for the increase in visits, indicating that the increase must be accounted for by visitors from other sectors. The results could be relevant for policymakers concerning the effects of strict polices targeting economically vulnerable national journals, and could further inform journal owners and editors on the effects of converting to open access. 

Attracting new users or business as usual? A case study of converting academic subscription based journals to open access | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press Journals

Abstract:  This paper studies a selection of eleven Norwegian journals in the humanities and social sciences and their conversion from subscription to open access, a move heavily incentivized by governmental mandates and open access policies. By investigating the journals’ visiting logs in the period 2014-2019, the study finds that a conversion to open access induces higher visiting numbers; all journals in the study had a significant increase which can be attributed to the conversion. Converting a journal had no spillover in terms of increased visits to previously published articles still behind the paywall in the same journals. Visits from previously subscribing Norwegian higher education institutions did not account for the increase in visits, indicating that the increase must be accounted for by visitors from other sectors. The results could be relevant for policymakers concerning the effects of strict polices targeting economically vulnerable national journals, and could further inform journal owners and editors on the effects of converting to open access.

 

Transparency and Open Science at the Journal of Personality – Wright – – Journal of Personality – Wiley Online Library

“Changes are afoot in the way the scientific community is approaching the practice and reporting of research. Spurred by concerns about the fundamental reliability (i.e., replicability), or rather lack thereof, of contemporary psychological science (e.g., Open Science Collaboration, 2015), as well as how we go about our business (e.g., Gelman & Loken, 2014), several recommendations have been furthered for increasing the rigor of the published research through openness and transparency. The Journal has long prized and published the type of research with features, like large sample sizes (Fraley & Vazire, 2014), that has fared well by replicability standards (Soto, 2019). The type of work traditionally published here, often relying on longitudinal samples, large public datasets (e.g., Midlife in the United States Study), or complex data collection designs (e.g., ambulatory assessment and behavioral coding) did not seem to fit neatly into the template of the emerging transparency practices. However, as thinking in the open science movement has progressed and matured, we have decided to full?throatedly endorse these practices and join the growing chorus of voices that are encouraging and rewarding more transparent work in psychological science. We believe this can be achieved while maintaining the “big tent” spirit of personality research at the Journal with a broad scope in content, methods, and analytical tools that has made it so special and successful all of these years. Moving forward, we will be rigorously implementing a number of procedures for openness and transparency consistent with the Transparency and Open Science Promotion (TOP) Guidelines.

The TOP Guidelines are organized into eight standards, each of which can be implemented at three levels of stringency (Nosek et al., 2015). In what follows, we outline the initial TOP Standards Levels adopted by the Journal and the associated rationale. Generally, we have adopted Level 2 standards, as we believe these strike a desirable balance between compelling a high degree of openness and transparency while not being overly onerous and a deterrent for authors interested in the Journal as an outlet for their work….”

Reimagining Academic Career Assessment: Stories of innovation and change

“This report and the accompanying online repository1 bring together case studies in responsible academic career assessment. Gathered by the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA),2 European University Association (EUA),3 and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) Europe, 4 the case studies independently serve as a source of inspiration for institutions looking to improve their academic career assessment practices. Following the publication of guidelines and recommendations on more responsible evaluation approaches, such as DORA,5 the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, 6 and the Metric Tide, 7 more and more institutions have begun to consider how to implement a range of practical changes and innovations in recent years. However, information about the creation and development of new practices in academic career assessment are not always easy to find. Collectively, the case studies will further facilitate this “practical turn” toward implementation by providing a structured overview and conceptual clarity on key characteristics and contextual factors. In doing so, the report examines emerging pathways of institutional reform of academic career assessment…”

Case study: Disseminating early research findings to influence decision-makers | UCL Open@UCL Blog

“Recently a researcher asked for our advice on the best way to disseminate her preliminary findings from a cross-disciplinary research project on COVID-19. She wanted to ensure policy makers in East Africa had immediate access to the findings so that they could make informed decisions. The researcher was aware that traditional models of publishing were not appropriate, not simply because of the length of time it generally takes for an article to be peer-reviewed and published, but because the findings would, most likely, be inaccessible to her intended audience in a subscription-based journal.

The Research Support and Open Access team advised the researcher to take a two-pronged approach which would require her to: (1) upload the working paper with the preliminary findings in a subject-specific open-access preprint service; and (2) to publicise the research findings in an online platform that is both credible and open access. We suggested she use SocArXiv and publish a summary of her findings in The Conversation Africa, which has a special section on COVID-19. The Conversation has several country-specific editions for Australia, Canada English, Canada French, France, Global Perspectives, Indonesia, New Zealand, Spain, United Kingdom and the United States, and is a useful vehicle to get academic research read by decision makers and the members of the public. We also suggested that the researcher publicise the research on the IOE London Blog….”

Reframing research access | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

The paper describes how Charles Darwin University (CDU) used a three-pronged approach to better serve its researchers: it developed a single interface for improved accessibility and discoverability of its research outputs, consolidated its corresponding policies and procedures and implemented training programs to support the new portal. This in turn made its suite of research outputs more openly accessible and better discoverable. The intention was to make CDU research compliant with the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) policy statement, affirming the need to make Australia’s research more visible, thereby enabling better access, better collaboration locally and internationally and researchers more accountable to their community.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses case study methodology and a qualitative approach.

Findings

CDU Library collaborated with the University’s Research Office in undertaking a series of strategies towards reframing access to its research. The partners migrated their research collections into a single, new, integrated interface; developed new policies and consolidated existing ones; and to this end, rolled out a training and educational program for the research community. The intention of the program was to introduce the Pure repository to new researchers and to train all staff to self archive and curate their own research outputs. This new streamlined approach ensured a more comprehensive and timely availability and accessibility of the University’s research outputs.

Originality/value

A single source of truth was established through the migration of iCDU’s research collections, ensuring data quality was maintained. At the start of this project, there were few institutions in Australia using the Pure system, and even fewer using it as their sole repository for displaying research outputs.

School of Data Science Open Access Guidelines and Recommendations — School of Data Science

“On February 3, 2021 the School of Data Science’s Academic Affairs Committee (AAC) officially passed the Open Access Guidelines and Recommendations. The University of Virginia School of Data Science is guided by goals to further discovery through open, collaborative, and responsible data science research. These guidelines and recommendations are adhered to by all faculty members in their research.

The Open Access Guidelines and Recommendations are part of the School of Data Science’s effort to drive innovation across boundaries in a culture of transparency and open access to knowledge….”