Closing the divide: Subject librarians and scholarly communication librarians can work together to reach common goals | Middleton | College & Research Libraries News

“Over the past year, I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about scholarly communication and the role of academic librarians, particularly subject or liaison librarians.

In July 2016, I took on a new role as the associate university librarian for research and scholarly communication at Oregon State University Libraries and Press (OSU)….In 2013, I became the associate university librarian for learning and engagement. During my years in public services, I noted that scholarly communication services at our library were being developed and provided by a small number of librarians who were not in public services, and some did not have subject assignments. I often wondered why scholarly communication was being developed outside the scope of the activities a subject librarian/liaison regularly engaged in when working with faculty….

In addition, in support of the OSU land grant heritage, I worked with community members to provide them with online access to research articles that did not require them to subscribe to a journal or to be a registered OSU faculty member or student to access them.

In 2013, when OSU faculty voted to adopt an open access mandate for our institution, I oversaw the subject librarians/liaisons who promoted the new policy in the campus departments and colleges that they represented.…”

Sharing the work of sharing Harvard’s research

“In early 2016, the Office for Scholarly Communication (OSC) launched a pilot project to recruit help from around the university to deposit faculty-authored articles in DASH, Harvard’s open-access repository. This project has the full support of the Harvard Library.  In January of this year, the project emerged from the pilot phase, and was officially renamed the Distributed DASH Deposits program, or D3. All Harvard schools have made a start with D3, and the next goal is to scale up.”

“Something Old, Something New , Something Bold, Something Cool: A Marriage of Two Repositories” by Carol Ann Davis and Jason Boczar

Abstract: “For the past several years, many libraries have been developing institutional repositories to house their open access publishing efforts to both showcase and preserve their faculty’s research. Some of those same libraries have been building sizable digital collections, often built from digitized versions of materials in their special collections. So what happens when you put these two groups together? The University of South Florida Tampa Library did exactly that by creating a new Digital Scholarship Services unit. The union of these two groups has created new synergies between staff in complementary areas of the library, as we combine unique skill sets from each group to offer new services to the faculty. This presentation will discuss why this change was made, examine some of the benefits and growing pains of this change, and showcase some of the unusual projects that have resulted. For example, a group of faculty from the College of Education has a multimodal project featuring new methodological approaches for analyzing various formats such as websites, images, and film. The library also has two research associates who are archaeologists creating three dimensional representations of artifacts for cultural heritage preservation that are now embedded with metadata in the repository. Creating such collections not only highlights the university’s work but provides materials professors can use to enhance their course curricula and use technology to engage students in new and innovative ways.”

Archives Without Archives: (Re)Locating and (Re)Defining the Archive Through Post-Custodial Praxis | Kelleher | Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies

Abstract:  The post-custodial paradigm of archives re-positions archivists from institutional custodians of archival records to stewards of records in their places of creation or use. Through this dislocation from traditional practice, post-custodial praxis democratizes the power dynamic of archives by disaggregating the value of archival records from dependence on the archival repository and prioritizing the context of records creation over records content. The post-custodial paradigm disaggregates archives praxis from physical custody of records and (re)locates the work of the archivist to be neither only the institutional repository nor the site of records creation, but rather a third space that crosses borders between the two and can function in both but belongs wholly to neither. This article discusses how locations of power and agency can be (re)positioned by post-custodial archives theory and praxis within a case study of the University of Texas Libraries’ Human Rights Documentation Initiative.

Workflow Development for an Institutional Repository in an Emerging Research Institution

“This paper describes the process librarians in the Albert B. Alkek Library at Texas State University undertook to increase the amount of faculty publications in their institutional repository, known as the Digital Collections. DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM Digital Collections at Texas State University is built on a DSpace platform and serves as the location for electronic theses and dissertations, faculty publications, and other digital Texas State University materials. Despite having launched the service in 2005, the amount of faculty work added to the repository has never been at the levels initially hoped for on launch.”

Beyond the Paywall: Examining Open Access and Data Sharing Practices Among Faculty at Virginia Tech Through the Lens of Social Exchange

“The movement towards open access has allowed academic researchers to communicate and share their scholarly content more widely by being freely available to Internet users. However, there are still issues of concern among faculty in regards to making their scholarly output open access. This study surveyed Virginia Tech faculty (N = 264) awareness and attitudes toward open access practices. In addition, faculty were asked to identify factors that inhibited or encouraged their participation in open access repositories. Findings indicate that while the majority of Virginia Tech faculty are seeking to publish in open access, many are unaware of the open access services provided by the university and even less are using the services available to them. Time, effort, and costs were identified as factors inhibiting open access and data sharing practices. Differences in awareness and attitudes towards open access were observed among faculty ranks and areas of research. Virginia Tech will need to increase faculty awareness of institutional open access repositories and maximize benefits over perceived costs if there is to be more faculty participation in open access practices.”

 

Open Access Indicators in Subject Digital Repositories. The Case of CLACSO´s Latin America and the Caribbean Social Sciences Digital Repository Indicators. – E-LIS repository

Abstract:  Since the beginning of the Repository, CLACSO defined that the monitoring and evaluation of the Repository would be made from three perspectives:

 – Community: The extent to which CLACSO manages to promote open access, including the publishers and libraries of in its network and virtual community, and regularly expose them to the trends of academic communications in open access, contributing to a cultural change in the Region and the adoption of open access for the dissemination of research results.

 – Collections: How the digital collections of the Member Centers and programs of CLACSO´s Digital Repository – including the collection of CLACSO journals in Redalyc – grow, taking care of geographical and institutional diversity, and performing specific actions to promote participation with contents in open access digital repositories from the Region. 

 – Use: How the Repository and its digital collections are used: number of downloads, countries of origin of requests, most requested digital objects, subjects most consulted. Starting in 2014, metrics at article level is experimented with some collections.

 CLACSO’s Digital Repository website offers, in open access, the statistical reports as they develop. These reports allow the tracking of the above-mentioned three variables of community, collection, and use of the Repository.

Institutional repository: access and use by academic staff at Egerton University, Kenya: Library Management: Vol 38, No 4/5

Abstract:  Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the access and use of the institutional repository (IR) among academic staff at Egerton University.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a description of the building and development of the IR at the Egerton university and describes expected benefits of the repository to the University and relevant stakeholders. A survey was conducted among 84 academic staff with an aim of examining their levels of awareness on the existence of the IR at the Egerton University and assess their access and use. Through a structured questionnaire both quantitative and qualitative data were collected.

Findings

The study revealed that majority of the academic staff at the Egerton University are still not aware of the existence of the IR. Staff also faced challenges in accessing and using the content available. The paper provided suggestions on how best to enhance the access and utilization of the IRs among the academic staff.

Practical implications

From a practical point of view, the paper provides implications on the access and use of IRs by the academic staff. The paper points out some challenges faced by this group of users which other academic institutions may try to solve in their respective contexts.

Originality/value

Findings and discussions provided in the paper will pave way to solving the challenges faced in access and use of IR by the academic staff at the Egerton University.

Self-Archiving Journal Articles: A Case Study of Faculty Practice and Missed Opportunity

Abstract:  Carnegie Mellon faculty Web pages and publisher policies were examined to understand self-archiving practice. The breadth of adoption and depth of commitment are not directly correlated within the disciplines. Determining when self-archiving has become a habit is difficult. The opportunity to self-archive far exceeds the practice, and much of what is self-archived is not aligned with publisher policy. Policy appears to influence neither the decision to self-archive nor the article version that is self-archived. Because of the potential legal ramifications, faculty must be convinced that copyright law and publisher policy are important and persuaded to act on that conviction.