The UK National Data Strategy 2020: engaging for resilience – The ODI

“At the ODI, we want a world where data works for everyone, and our manifesto outlines how this vision can be achieved. Engagement is one of our manifesto points. Everyone must be able to take part in making data work for us all. Organisations and communities should collaborate on how data is used and accessed to help solve their problems. How could this principle be realised in a national data strategy?”

Our manifesto – The ODI

“INFRASTRUCTURE: Sectors and societies must invest in and protect the data infrastructure they rely on. Open data is the foundation of this emerging vital infrastructure.

CAPABILITY: Everyone must have the opportunity to understand how data can be and is being used. We need data literacy for all, data science skills, and experience using data to help solve problems.
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INNOVATION: Data must inspire and fuel innovation. It can enable businesses, startups, governments, individuals and communities to create products and services, fuelling economic growth and productivity.
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EQUITY: Everyone must benefit fairly from data. Access to data and information promotes fair competition and informed markets, and empowers people as consumers, creators and citizens.
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ETHICS: People and organisations must use data ethically. The choices made about what data is collected and how it is used should not be unjust, discriminatory or deceptive.
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ENGAGEMENT: Everyone must be able to take part in making data work for us all. Organisations and communities should collaborate on how data is used and accessed to help solve their problems.”

Open Call Webinar – Peer Learning Network for Data Collaborations | Register – Contact information

“The Open Data Institute has partnered with Microsoft to launch its Open Data Campaign, which aims to address the data divide and help organisations of all sizes to realise the benefits of data and the new technologies it powers. 

 

As part of the campaign, we’re launching a peer learning network that will convene organisations collaborating around data, providing them with financial and other support from the ODI and Microsoft. Ultimately this will enable them to more effectively address the challenges they face. 

 

On Thursday 29 October 2020, 9:00am PDT/ 4:00pm GMT / 5:00pm CET, join us for a live webinar to learn more about the peer learning network opportunity. We will go over the open call for applications in more detail and provide an opportunity for attendees to ask any related questions before the application deadline (17 November 2020 at 11:59pm PST / 18 November 7:59am GMT (8:59am CET). …”

Microsoft and the Open Data Institute join together to launch a Peer Learning Network for Data Collaborations – Microsoft on the Issues

“Today, in partnership with the Open Data Institute (ODI), we are delighted to announce an open call for participation in a new Peer Learning Network for Data Collaborations. Peer learning networks are an important tool to foster the exchange of knowledge and help participants learn from one another so they can more effectively address the challenges they face.

In April, with the launch of Microsoft’s Open Data Campaign, we committed to putting open and shared data into practice by addressing specific challenges through data collaborations. For a data collaboration to achieve its goals, there are many factors that must come together successfully. Oftentimes, this process can be incredibly challenging. From aligning on key outcomes and data use agreements to preparing datasets for use and analysis, these considerations require time and extensive coordination….

Awardees will have the opportunity to:

receive up to £20,000 for their time over the six months of the peer learning network
learn about and receive guidance from the ODI and Microsoft on different technical approaches, governance mechanisms, and other means for managing data collaborations
connect with peers also working on these challenges

For the purpose of the Peer Learning Network, data collaborations are defined as:

involving a collaboration of companies, research institutions, non-profits, and/or government entities
addressing a clear societal or business-related challenge
are working to make their data as open as possible in the context of the collaboration (collaborations working with restrictions related to privacy or commercial sensitivity are encouraged to apply)
ultimately demonstrate increased access to, and/or meaningful use of, data in reaching the specific goal …”

ODI Summit 2020 – The ODI

“In light of recent global events, discussions around data sharing – and how we use that data – are more critical than ever. For this is the time for decision, the future’s already arrived.

The ODI Summit is the ODI’s flagship event, bringing people from a broad range of sectors, backgrounds and countries together to discuss critical issues around the future of data. Join over 1000 attendees to enjoy an exciting line-up of keynotes, high-profile speakers, interactive panels, roundtables, performances, taster workshops and demos exploring key themes about the future of data.

The event has keynotes from the ODI’s co-founders, inventor of the web Sir Tim Berners-Lee and artificial intelligence expert Sir Nigel Shadbolt and the ODI’s Vice President, Jeni Tennison….”

Help us understand how certification can help build trust in data ecosystems – The ODI

“Assessing the trustworthiness of others can be both time consuming and costly. At the Open Data Institute (ODI) we’ve embarked on a project that aims to identify which types of standards and independent assessments can have the most impact in bridging trust gaps in data ecosystems.

And we would like your help to do this. We want to hear from you about your experiences and insights around how standards and certifications can help to build, demonstrate or assess trustworthiness.

This work builds on previous work at the ODI: increasing access to data while retaining trust; how to craft open standards for data; and how to design trustworthy and sustainable data institutions….”

Help us understand how certification can help build trust in data ecosystems – The ODI

“Assessing the trustworthiness of others can be both time consuming and costly. At the Open Data Institute (ODI) we’ve embarked on a project that aims to identify which types of standards and independent assessments can have the most impact in bridging trust gaps in data ecosystems.

And we would like your help to do this. We want to hear from you about your experiences and insights around how standards and certifications can help to build, demonstrate or assess trustworthiness.

This work builds on previous work at the ODI: increasing access to data while retaining trust; how to craft open standards for data; and how to design trustworthy and sustainable data institutions….”

Octopub

“An ODI experiment, Octopub offers simple way to prepare and check a dataset, and publish it online onto the GitHub platform….

Data isn’t open until an open licence has been applied. You can choose a licence that suits your needs.

If you know nothing about licences, nothing to worry about, we’ll help you choose….

Want your data to be high quality? Reusable? Machine readable? We encourage you to apply schemas to your files, and we can help you get started….

Octopub can check the quality of your CSV files for common errors.

We’ll give you quality feedback, and you can review and re-upload as often as you need to until the data you want to publish is of the highest standard….”

Covid-19 project support: success and next steps – The ODI

“The guides and tools we created, which was the first focus of the project, is currently being wrapped up. We have now published guides on open data, models, anonymisation and ethics as well as an explainer on the different kinds of apps available and the data they collect – the latter has proved particularly popular and useful, especially with the controversy around contact tracing apps.

Part of the work in that stream was to update our Octopub open source publishing tool, so that we could recommend it as safe and easy-to-use in this novel context. One nice example of its use has been by the Trades Union Congress, who has been publishing collated data about workplace safety as part of a drive for safe return to work.

The advisory and advocacy work has been extensive and multifaceted. Our public call for organisations needing help yielded contacts with over 60 projects. So far, with a little help from our friends at Open Data Charter, we have been talking with, advising and helping public health agencies and data experts in governments from the UK to central and south America. We have also been advising non-government organisations, from private sector companies to civil society projects like BlackThrive, Turn2Us, and Project Lockdown….”

ODI Fridays: Enabling data sharing with the Data Pitch Toolkit – The ODI

“Through the increase of data science techniques, not least Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI), the value and role of data as an asset becomes ever more crucial. This has made it more important for data to be accessible. However, much of the data that many solutions require are held within private organisations – and are only available if they are shared.

The Data Pitch Data Sharing Toolkit helps organisations that want to generate value by sharing data or facilitating data sharing. It been pulled together from experience collected on several projects and initiatives, including, but not limited to, the Data Pitch innovation programme.

The toolkit explains the concept, challenges, and processes to enable successful data sharing, and provide resources and recommendations to make data sharing successful in practice. The talk will give a flavour of the toolkit and the insights it was developed from, focussing on how data sharing works in practice, which challenges organisations should be prepared for, and how to overcome them.”