International open access practices: Strategies beyond the APC model

“Increasingly, the governments and private organizations which fund research are mandating that the research outputs they support are made available as open access content. These efforts are impacting both established and growing efforts to share research widely.

This panel discussion will feature four presentations that address how large-scale developments in open access, particularly in regard to those emphasizing the article processing charge (APC) model, are impacting or influencing other programs which enhance access to scholarly content under different models. A Question and Answer session will follow.

The events speakers will discuss the Open Library of Humanities, research database integration of open access content in Iran, an overview of the open access mandates and policies of Latin American countries, and the Research4Life program.”

Clinical trials sponsored by industry and other private organizations

Abstract:  The present manuscript discussed some relevant aspects related to private sponsored clinical trials in dentistry. For decades, the academy has been the major responsible for research in Brazil. Distant from the trade sector, academic research has not always provided clear benefits to society. A key aspect of making benefits clearer is the process of scientific knowledge transference to decision-makers, which is, in fact, the ground of evidence-based dentistry. Although private sponsoring of clinical research seems to be part of the research progress of the business rates, investment in Brazil is lower than those observed in other countries. It is particularly important to understand that instead of creating its own rules, dentistry imported the high-quality standards originally designed for pharmaceutical studies. Therefore, it is critical to understand the original rules and how dental items are classified by regulatory agencies. In fact, knowledge about international and local regulation is a basic assumption in industry-sponsored research. Despite globalization, the identification of industry-sponsored studies through open access databases is still very hard and time-demanding. A common concern when conducting industry-sponsored trials is study biases. Fortunately, many relevant organizations, academic and industry groups, have been working seriously against that. Finally, for less experienced researchers, many aspects related to industry-sponsored studies – such as confidentiality, authorship, budget – are deeply discussed until a final version of the trial agreement can be written and signed, protecting all sides. In short, the scenario should be improved, but it already represents a nice opportunity for dental research.

 

Evaluación científica y el acceso abierto (Introducción) | OpenlabEC

From Google’s English:  “What do you want to obtain when it is measured in the evaluation process? What do we measure for? What are the effects of Citation Indicator Based Assessment (FI-SJR)?

The talk will review the dominant evaluation model based on the FI / SJR, in quartiles; The effects it has had on LATAM and the possibilities of implementing different indicators will be explored….”

OpenlabEC

From Google’s English:  “We are a citizen laboratory in Ecuador, which seeks to generate dialogues and experiences related to digital culture, citizen participation and open knowledge. We define ourselves as activists for the free software movement, popular and critical education, citizen science, privacy, open innovation, the development of computational thinking and the horizontal exchange of knowledge.

We do everything, debates, courses, hackathons, labs, social projects, mentoring, art exhibitions, mapping, conferences, all from an open and collaborative perspective. We want to support the free and digital culture communities of the country, necessary to promote the economy of knowledge and creativity that society needs.

We advise the production of virtual events and innovation processes with academic institutions, the media, NGOs and civil society.

We are a non-profit organization that seeks to generate redistribution and self-management of its processes. We collaborate with different organizations in the country and Latin America related to our same principles.”

LA Referencia – Big Deals survey shows that Latin America spends a little over USD $100 million per year on information resources

11 Latin American countries participated in the survey

82% of the surveyed countries say their expectations of Big Deals negotiations have been transformed by the importance of the Open Access movement.

79% of the expenditures (a little more than USD $81 million) are directed to 5 large publishers….”

Transforming Research Excellence: New Ideas from the Global South

From Cameron Neylon’s article, pp. 110-11: “By contrast, the systems, funders, institutions and scholars of Latin America and Africa have led the world on public access to formal publications, on the building of sharing infrastructures, and in the support of research units that have a deep insight into the societal issues around them (see e.g. chapters in this volume by Barrere, and by Allen and Marincola). While the UK and the Netherlands have loudly promulgated policies and spent vast sums of money on delivering open access, Brazil has had higher levels of open access for a decade and many Latin American universities retain higher levels of open access publishing than comparators in the North. South Africa has higher levels of open access to publications on issues that are the main contributors to South African mortality than the Netherlands….”

Brazilian Publication Profiles: Where and How Brazilian authors publish

Abstract:  Publishing profiles can help institutions and financing agencies understand the different needs of knowledge areas and regions for development within a country. Incites ® (Web of Science) was used to see where Brazilian authors were publishing, the impact, and the cost of this publishing. The USA was the country of choice for publishing journals, along with Brazil, England, and the Netherlands. While Brazilian authors continue to publish in hybrid journals, they are more often opting for closed access, with 89% of the papers published in Brazil being open access, compared with 21% of papers published abroad. The correlation between the cost of publishing and the number of citations was positive and significant. Publishing patterns were different depending on the area of knowledge and the Brazilian region. Stagnation or reduction in publications with international collaboration, industry collaboration, or in high impact open access journals may be the cause of a reduction in citation impact. These data can help in elaborating public and institutional policies for financing publications in Brazil, especially when looking at unfavourable changes in currency exchange rates.

 

SciELO network and accessibility: emphasis on policies, products and services | SciELO in Perspective

“As part of the alignment with open science research communication practices, the SciELO Program initiated an interdisciplinary work plan aimed at promoting accessibility to the SciELO Network products and web services….

Promoting open science and open access is not necessarily synonymous with promoting accessibility. If we do not pay attention to this, and overcome attitudinal, technological, communicational, and programmatic barriers, we will be legitimizing the violation of the individual rights of citizens of different societies on a daily basis to access what has been developed by scientific communities….”

SciELO network and accessibility: emphasis on policies, products and services | SciELO in Perspective

“As part of the alignment with open science research communication practices, the SciELO Program initiated an interdisciplinary work plan aimed at promoting accessibility to the SciELO Network products and web services….

Promoting open science and open access is not necessarily synonymous with promoting accessibility. If we do not pay attention to this, and overcome attitudinal, technological, communicational, and programmatic barriers, we will be legitimizing the violation of the individual rights of citizens of different societies on a daily basis to access what has been developed by scientific communities….”

Manifiesto bibliotecario por la Ciencia Abierta en América Latina | by Juan José Calderón Amador * ? ? | #T5eS? emergencia y esclavitud digital | Aug, 2020 | Medium

From Google’s English:  The Latin American librarians gathered in Bogotá in the framework of OpenCon LatAm 2019, in accordance with the Declaration of Panama on Open, Reproducible and Replicable Science (2018), “we want to make public our confidence in the role of education, culture and science , as the engine of democracy, freedom and social justice in the current historical moment ”. We want more science, we want it for everyone and we want it open.

We declare that:

Our mission is to ensure the right to information and knowledge as a fundamental right, indispensable for education, culture and science.
We recognize knowledge as a common good and we see open science as an opportunity for the development of a sustainable model that ensures the creation, management and communication of data, information and knowledge for all people in society, in all its diversity, without class distinction or conditions.
We are key actors to promote and facilitate cultural change, We assume the commitment to accompany the transition processes and social mobilization, promoting the appropriation of technologies, tools, methodologies, use, generation and opening of knowledge in Latin America and the Caribbean

Therefore, we are committed to developing and supporting the following actions in agreed and collaborative agendas between professionals, citizens, institutions and countries….”