El Ministerio de Educación de la Argentina y la Coalición S: una asociación que restringirá el Acceso Abierto

“As members of the National University of La Plata, with institutional responsibilities in the visibility of scientific production, we express our concern over the decision of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Science and Technology of the Nation to actively participate in the so-called Coalition S , an international alliance that promotes open access to scientific-academic publications, but under the “charge for publishing in open” (APC) model. Adherence to this system represents an unnecessary millionaire expense, which is also paid with public research funds….”

North vs South – Are open access models in conflict?

“One particular challenge for researchers in the Global South is the potential for a shift from a ‘pay to read’ model of scholarly communication to a ‘pay to publish’ model in which researchers do not have the resources necessary to publish their research.

Plan S has stated that it is not focused on delivering only one business model for scholarly communication. However, Article Processing Charges (APCs) have been the only model clearly identified for financing.

If Plan S is proposing to pursue a global flip to open access, we believe that this will require the recognition and support of diverse business models and a clearer definition of the resources these organisations will need to implement these policies, much in the same way the coalition has provided guidance to commercial publishers to secure funding for APC payments.

For a system that publicly subsidises scholarly communication through academic institutions, as in Latin America, implementing charges to authors heightens the risk of breaking a structure that has been designed to support researchers and keep public money within a publicly managed ecosystem.

As Leslie Chan notes, when opening access is decontextualised from its historical and political roots, it has the potential to become as exploitative and oppressive as the system it is seeking to replace….”

DEADLINE APPROACHNG, 1 OCTOBER: Applications for CODATA-RDA School of Research Data Science, San José, Costa Rica, 2-13 December 2019 – CODATA

“This school provides early career researchers (at MSc-level to 3 years after their PhD) from the Latin American Region with the necessary set of foundational data science skills to enable them to analyse their data in an efficient and effective manner for the 21st century.

Description:

The material covered here is fundamental to all areas of data science and hence open to researchers and professionals from all disciplines that deal with significant amounts of data. The goal is to provide a practical introduction to these topics with extensive labs and seminars….”

Where do we aspire to publish? A position paper on scientific communication in biochemistry and molecular biology

Abstract:  The scientific publication landscape is changing quickly, with an enormous increase in options and models. Articles can be published in a complex variety of journals that differ in their presentation format (online-only or in-print), editorial organizations that maintain them (commercial and/or society-based), editorial handling (academic or professional editors), editorial board composition (academic or professional), payment options to cover editorial costs (open access or pay-to-read), indexation, visibility, branding, and other aspects. Additionally, online submissions of non-revised versions of manuscripts prior to seeking publication in a peer-reviewed journal (a practice known as pre-printing) are a growing trend in biological sciences. In this changing landscape, researchers in biochemistry and molecular biology must re-think their priorities in terms of scientific output dissemination. The evaluation processes and institutional funding for scientific publications should also be revised accordingly. This article presents the results of discussions within the Department of Biochemistry, University of São Paulo, on this subject.

 

Where do we aspire to publish? A position paper on scientific communication in biochemistry and molecular biology

Abstract:  The scientific publication landscape is changing quickly, with an enormous increase in options and models. Articles can be published in a complex variety of journals that differ in their presentation format (online-only or in-print), editorial organizations that maintain them (commercial and/or society-based), editorial handling (academic or professional editors), editorial board composition (academic or professional), payment options to cover editorial costs (open access or pay-to-read), indexation, visibility, branding, and other aspects. Additionally, online submissions of non-revised versions of manuscripts prior to seeking publication in a peer-reviewed journal (a practice known as pre-printing) are a growing trend in biological sciences. In this changing landscape, researchers in biochemistry and molecular biology must re-think their priorities in terms of scientific output dissemination. The evaluation processes and institutional funding for scientific publications should also be revised accordingly. This article presents the results of discussions within the Department of Biochemistry, University of São Paulo, on this subject.

 

‘Transformative’ open access publishing deals are only entrenching commercial power | Times Higher Education (THE)

“Plan S has already been credited with sparking something of a revolution in journal publishing. Major publishers are beginning – slowly and reluctantly in some cases – to replace their traditional “big deals” with what are being called “transformative deals”. Often negotiated with national consortia of libraries and research institutes, these combine access to subscription journals with an ability to publish open access without any additional charge.

However, I believe that we should think a lot harder before celebrating a tipping point.

The open access movement has always been intimately bound up with a critique of the whole concept of handing over billions of pounds of public money to wildly profitableprivate companies in exchange for publishing papers that are written, reviewed and edited by academics. Yet the current “transformative” deals do precious little to drive down margins that are often in excess of 35 per cent….

Instead of recklessly funnelling billions of taxpayers’ money into for-profit entities, funding bodies and research institutes could easily support these more sustainable ventures instead. This is already happening in some parts of the world, with initiatives such as Redalyc and SciELO in Latin America demonstrating leadership….

Every time we sign one of these so-called transformative contracts, which often contain multi-year lock-ins, we lose the opportunity to create something more just, sustainable, efficient and effective. We actively work against efforts to return control of publishing to the academic community. It is time to take a step back and to think again about what we really want.”

AmeliCA before Plan S – The Latin American Initiative to develop a cooperative, non-commercial, academic led, system of scholarly communication | Impact of Social Sciences

“Open access is often discussed as a process of flipping the existing closed subscription based model of scholarly communication to an open one. However, in Latin America an open access ecosystem for scholarly publishing has been in place for over a decade. In this post, Eduardo Aguado-López and Arianna Becerril-Garcia discuss open access developments in Latin America and the AmeliCA initiative to develop a cooperative infrastructure for scientific communication. They also reflect on how the recent proposals put forward by cOAlition S to foster open access publication in the Global North, could potentially negatively impact open access efforts in Latin America. …”

OpenCon 2019 Latam

From Google’s English: “OpenCon is the international conference on open access to scientific and academic knowledge, open education and open data, especially aimed at students and those who are in their first years of academic professional career. It is a contribution to forming the leaders of the future on these issues.

 

OpenCon is organized by Right to Research Coalition , SPARC ( The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition ) and a Committee composed of students and young academic professionals from various parts of the world. In the 2014 and 2016 editions the conference was held in Washington DC, in 2015 in Brussels, in 2017 in Berlin and in 2018 in Toronto.

In addition, OpenCon supports the realization of satellite events organized by the participants themselves. The satellite events have taken place in 25 countries and they discuss education content, access and open data globally, as well as local presentations. In the recent Toronto OpenCon 2018, participants from the Latin American region who participated in the conference chose Colombia to hold OpenCon LatAm 2019 , because an active community has been identified in the country, with relevant actors, which promote and promote Open ecosystems and elements of open science….”