Openness and Sharing of Agricultural Research Outputs In India – Google Docs

“You are invited to join us in writing this crowd-sourced article. The side-headings are only suggestive and you may add to the list. You may also share this document <https://bit.ly/2JyuAjc> with your colleagues and friends whom you may think can contribute substantially.  Contact: Sridhar Gutam <gutam2000@gmail.com>….”

Global Food Policy Report 2018, International Food Policy Research Institute

From Chapter 6:

“KEY FINDINGS 

? Open data can improve the performance of food systems and help achieve global food and nutrition security. 

? Accessible data are critical for decision making, from the farm to the retail level of food systems. 

? Open data increase both the visibility and utility of research, allowing researchers to create more knowledge products and support decision making. 

? Open data allow governments to make evidence-based policy decisions and push governments toward increased accountability. 

? Data quality and ease of use are essential for putting data to use, but datasets are often too large or complex to be easily handled. 

? Inequality in access to knowledge is increasing. Data policies, commitments, and investments can improve access to and use of knowledge, but current commitment and action on open data are uneven. 

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS 

? Democratize data access and improve livelihoods by putting data tools, such as mobile-phone apps, into farmers’ hands. 

? Increase the efficiency of knowledge transfers to prevent loss of information and ensure uptake in the field. 

? Make government “big data” public to drive high-quality analysis of food systems and better policy and decision making. 

? Build open data initiatives, including to reduce inequality and address issues of data quality, use, storage, and dissemination. 

? Increase data quality and ease of use through better data collection, new tools, working groups, capacity building, and improvements in big data platforms. 

? Empower citizen stakeholders to demand open data through capacity building and access to data tools.”

Principles for disseminating scientific innovations | Broad Institute

“As an academic non-profit research institute [associated with Harvard and MIT], Broad recognizes the unique role that such institutions play in propelling the biomedical ecosystem by exploring fundamental questions and working on risky, early-stage projects that often lack clear economic return.

To maximize its impact, our work (including discoveries, data, tools, technologies, knowledge, and intellectual property) should be made readily available for use, at no cost, by other academic and non-profit research institutions….

With respect to commercial licensing, our most important consideration is maximizing public benefit.

  • In most cases, we believe that this goal is best accomplished through non-exclusive licensing, which allows many companies to use innovations and thus compete to bring to market products incorporating them.
  • In some cases, we recognize that an exclusive license to an innovation may be necessary to justify the level of private investment required to develop a product and bring it to market. (An example is the composition-of-matter of drug. Without an exclusive license, a company would be reluctant to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in a clinical trial to demonstrate safety and efficacy, because competitors could subsequently ‘free-ride’ on their results to bring the same product to market.)

In each case, we evaluate the justification for exclusivity and seek to limit the scope of exclusivity….”

eROSA Project at a Glance | Aginfra Erosa

“The strategic goal of e-ROSA is to provide guidance to EU policies by designing and laying the groundwork for a long-term programme aiming at achieving an e-infrastructure for open science in agriculture that would position Europe as a major global player at the forefront of research and innovation in this area….”

eROSA project releases Vision Document “Towards an e-Infrastructure for Open Science in AgriFood” | Agricultural Information Management Standards (AIMS)

“The eROSA project on it’s 2nd stakeholder workshop in November 2017 at Wageningen UR has released a Vision Paper “Towards an e-Infrastructure for Open Science in AgriFood”. This documents outlines the necessary developments until 2030 to reach a state in which “food systems will produce healthy nutritious foods for all, produced through input-efficient methods and supporting a thriving environment. Food Systems will operate as collaborative networks that are constantly seeking to improve their economic, environmental and social performance”. Based on this Vision Paper, the project team will elaborate Roadmaps to information infrastructures with summer 2018. The Vision paper has been released for comments from all stakeholders. It is accessible at https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nnHl_h1nzSBqfiw9fFE2XVVt8S-LFrtwunM2b5TNEcE/edit. “

Open Access India Projects

The community of practice, Open Access India had taken up few crowdsourced projects viz., Forum for Open Access in SAARC Countries, National Open Access Policy for India, AgriXiv – Preprint Repository for Agriculture, CrowdSource project on mapping the ISSN Journals from India

Open Access India Projects

The community of practice, Open Access India had taken up few crowdsourced projects viz., Forum for Open Access in SAARC Countries, National Open Access Policy for India, AgriXiv – Preprint Repository for Agriculture, CrowdSource project on mapping the ISSN Journals from India

FFAR awards $1 million grant to create open source technology for gene discovery in plants | Crops | hpj.com

“The starting point will be approximately 1,000 human kinase inhibitors carefully selected from a library of chemical compounds donated to the partnership from eight pharmaceutical companies. The set will be distributed without restriction to scientists studying other plants and traits, thus serving as a broadly useful platform. The team has agreed to operate under open access principles —specifically prohibiting filing for IP on any of the results and will communicate the results widely….”