An open data law for climate resilience and disaster risk reduction | PreventionWeb.net

“This document aims to clarify the key elements of open data and to serve as a proposal to institute and strictly implement a policy for climate change and disaster risk reduction-related data and information based on its articulated and internationally accepted definition in the Philippines. The document describes the different considerations for the Philippines in its decision to fully adopt, support and promote a policy for open data for DRR. Defining the standards in an open data law will mandate compliance to the key elements of open data, which include: availability in digital format of data, downloadable via the internet in bulk for ease of use; amenability to intermixing with other datasets through an interoperable format structure and machine-readability of digital files; freedom to use, reuse and redistribute, even on commercial basis; and a ‘no conditions’ rule on the use of open data, except for appropriate citation for due credit.”

https://www.scribd.com/document/374847472/An-Open-Data-Law-for-Climate-Resilience-and-Disaster-Risk-Reduction

Nine post-Harvey research projects receive funding from Rice

“The Harvey Memories Project [about the 2017 Hurrican Harvey] will launch and maintain a state-of-the-art, open-access digital repository to collect, preserve and publish community-contributed memories of the storm in multiple formats, such as photos documenting storm preparations, audio and video recordings of the storm in progress and survivors’ narratives….”

As “Climate Change” Fades from Government Sites, a Struggle to Archive Data | War on the EPA | FRONTLINE | PBS | Official Site

“When the Environmental Protection Agency’s website underwent an overhaul of climate change information on a Friday in late April, Toly Rinberg and Andrew Bergman, both Harvard Ph.D. students in applied physics, set off to figure out what was gone. Sitting in their shared Washington, D.C. apartment, they started a spreadsheet to track the changes. Suddenly missing, they noticed, were scores of pages dedicated to helping state and local governments deal with climate change. The EPA site where those pages lived, titled “Climate and Energy Resources for State, Local, and Tribal Governments,” would disappear for three months, only to come back in July without the word “climate” in its title. The new website now focuses only on energy policy and resources, and is down to 175 pages from 380.”

FFAR awards $1 million grant to create open source technology for gene discovery in plants | Crops | hpj.com

“The starting point will be approximately 1,000 human kinase inhibitors carefully selected from a library of chemical compounds donated to the partnership from eight pharmaceutical companies. The set will be distributed without restriction to scientists studying other plants and traits, thus serving as a broadly useful platform. The team has agreed to operate under open access principles —specifically prohibiting filing for IP on any of the results and will communicate the results widely….”

Harvard-China Project on Energy, Economy and Environment Adopts an Open-Access Policy

“The Harvard-China Project on Energy, Economy and Environment is pleased to announce that the Project’s faculty, researchers, and staff have adopted an open-access policy. They unanimously endorsed the policy on September 21, 2017 to grant Harvard a nonexclusive and worldwide right to distribute “the fruits of [their] research and scholarship as widely as possible.” 

Trump’s NOAA nominee could shut down open government weather data to benefit his family business

“AccuWeather has been trying to block open access to publicly-funded weather data for more than a decade. Its interest is to sell the same data to the public without “unfair competition” from the government. In the past it pursued this goal through Rick Santorum, the venal Senator from AccuWeather’s home state of Pennsylvania. Now it’s pursuing this goal through Donald Trump….”

Trump’s pick for NOAA chief causes a storm – POLITICO

“As a top executive at AccuWeather, Barry Myers has pushed for limits on the kinds of products that the National Weather Service offers to the public, saying they offered unfair competition to his industry.

Now, President Donald Trump’s nomination of Myers to lead the weather service’s parent agency could allow him to make those kinds of restrictions mandatory — to the benefit of his family-run forecasting company….”