8 Ways Departing EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Suppressed Science – Truthdig

“In March, Pruitt proposed a new “science transparency policy.” Under the proposed rule, when the EPA designs pollution standards and rules, it would use only studies in which the underlying data is public. Pruitt said his policy would prevent the EPA from using “secret science” that cannot be tested by other researchers. But scientists say important findings could be excluded.

One example is research by Harvard University that linked fine particle pollution in U.S. cities with an increase in deaths from lung and heart diseases. The data for the 1993 study was key to the EPA’s setting of health standards that regulate air pollution. But the study’s underlying data is not public because researchers promised confidentiality to their subjects, 8,000 adults and 14,000 children in six cities….”

CCI Sea Ice Dataset Release (Sea Ice Thickness v2.0) | CCI Open Data Portal

The CCI Sea Ice team is pleased to announce the release of their updated version of the sea-ice thickness dataset (v2.0). This dataset includes observations, made by two radar altimeter missions – Envisat and CryoSat-2, on polar Winters between October 2002 and April 2017. This dataset, in comparison to the previous dataset (v1.0), provides a number improvements which include improved sea-ice thickness retrievals from Envisat data, an experimental data record in the southern hemisphere, the delivery of trajectory-based Level 2 products and the availability of freeboard data in Level 2 and 3 products. 

The sea-ice thickness data is open and publicly available via the CCI Data Portal….”

Joint declaration by the African, Caribbean and Pacific group of states and the EU on climate change – Consilium

The Joint declaration by the African, Caribbean and Pacific group of states and the EU on climate change includes thanks (Section 14) for “the Intra-ACP Climate Services Programme, an initiative of the ACP Group of States, funded with 85 million EUR, also from the European Development Fund, to strengthen the capacities of regional hydro-meteorological organisations to take advantage of the full and open access to high-resolution data and value-added information from the EU’s Earth Observation Programme, Copernicus.”

Obstacles facing Africa’s young climate scientists | Nature Climate Change

“However, early-career scientists in Africa face numerous challenges in securing resources, training and research positions. These challenges threaten to undermine the continent’s ability to deal with environmental change resulting from climate change….One such challenge is underfunded and inadequate research facilities4. Computational and e-infrastructure limitations are especially salient; high demand for supercomputers and sufficient storage for big data far exceed what most African universities can afford. The ratio between the number of usable computers and users is low in most universities5. Some also struggle to bear the cost of subscribing to closed-access journals. While open-access journals provide unmeasurable succour to researchers in these institutions, scientists are left with an incomplete view of progress in their fields….”

Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (Public Lab)

“Public Lab was founded in the wake of the 2010 BP oil disaster. During the spill, there was an information blackout for residents of the coastal region, as well as the rest of the world. No one was accurately tracking what was happening on the ground. In response a group of concerned residents, environmental advocates, designers, and social scientists lofted “community satellites,” made from balloons, kites and digital cameras, over the spill to collect real time data about its impact. Local citizens collected the images, and through a newly created open source platform, contributors stitch over 100,000 aerial images into maps of the coastline before, during, and after the oil spread. These high-resolution maps were featured by BBC and New York Times, among others, allowing residents to speak their truth about what was going on in the Gulf Coast.

The success of the grassroots mapping effort galvanized the group to found Public Lab as a new research and social space for the development of low-cost tools for community-based environmental monitoring and assessment….”

Ocean Tool for Public Understanding and Science

“The Ocean Tool for Public Understanding and Science (OcToPUS) is a research initiative at the University of Oxford located at the Department of Zoology and initiated through the Oxford Martin School Programme on Sustainable Oceans (http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/research/programmes/sustainable-oceans). We aim to support scienti c study, monitoring, policy and decision-making related to the management of the oceans….

OcToPUS relies on established free and open-source geospatial technology to provide interactive access to dynamically updated, multi-dimensional data on the marine environment. A retrospective approach to big data archives allows us to present information on temporal trends and variability in ocean phenomena and to identify hotspots of change in the oceans….”

What’s the Best Way to Responsibly Collect Ocean Data? – Eos

“Workshop participants determined that the path forward centers on the adoption of the Ocean Best Practices (OBP) “repository,” developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (UNESCO-IODE). The UNESCO-IODE repository is a sustained, open access, and internationally recognized store of standard operating procedures, manuals, operating guidelines, and documentation of methods. It is focused on offering to the ocean community the best practices that have repeatedly produced superior results relative to other methodologies with the same objective and applied in the same environmental context….”

What’s the Best Way to Responsibly Collect Ocean Data? – Eos

“Workshop participants determined that the path forward centers on the adoption of the Ocean Best Practices (OBP) “repository,” developed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (UNESCO-IODE). The UNESCO-IODE repository is a sustained, open access, and internationally recognized store of standard operating procedures, manuals, operating guidelines, and documentation of methods. It is focused on offering to the ocean community the best practices that have repeatedly produced superior results relative to other methodologies with the same objective and applied in the same environmental context….”

An open data law for climate resilience and disaster risk reduction | PreventionWeb.net

“This document aims to clarify the key elements of open data and to serve as a proposal to institute and strictly implement a policy for climate change and disaster risk reduction-related data and information based on its articulated and internationally accepted definition in the Philippines. The document describes the different considerations for the Philippines in its decision to fully adopt, support and promote a policy for open data for DRR. Defining the standards in an open data law will mandate compliance to the key elements of open data, which include: availability in digital format of data, downloadable via the internet in bulk for ease of use; amenability to intermixing with other datasets through an interoperable format structure and machine-readability of digital files; freedom to use, reuse and redistribute, even on commercial basis; and a ‘no conditions’ rule on the use of open data, except for appropriate citation for due credit.”

https://www.scribd.com/document/374847472/An-Open-Data-Law-for-Climate-Resilience-and-Disaster-Risk-Reduction