Study Suggests Publisher Public Access Outpacing Open Access; Gold OA Decreases Citation Performance – The Scholarly Kitchen

“A recent study, out as a preprint, offers something of a muddled bag of methodological choices and compromises, but presents several surprising data points, namely that voluntary publisher efforts may be providing broader access to the literature than Gold or Green open access (OA), and some confounding shifts in claims of an open access citation advantage.”

The Open Source Ethos | A Growing Culture

“The internet now provides a free platform for sharing knowledge. How is it possible—or even socially just—that so many of us can’t get access to scholarly research? Isn’t society propelled forward by access to the science, literature, and art of the world’s scholars? What if that research is publicly funded? These are the primary concerns that drive the open access movement.

What would these concerns look like if we removed them from the scholarly communications circle and applied them to realms beyond the ivory tower like nature, society, technology, and ultimately the intersection of those things—agriculture. How does resource sharing affect biodiversity? How does knowledge exchange drive community resilience? How is information access—delivered via technologies—an equalizer among the underrepresented, marginalized, and oppressed? How does our ability to feed a growing planet depend on a culture of openness? Let me work my way back.”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | Open Access: Toward the Internet of the Mind

“On February 14, 2002, a small text of fewer than a thousand words quietly appeared on the Web: titled the “Budapest Open Access Initiative” (BOAI), it gave a public face to discussions between sixteen participants that had taken place on December 1 and 2, 2001 in Budapest, at the invitation of the Open Society Foundations (then known as the Open Society Institute)….Wedding the old – the scientific ethos – with the new – computers and the Internet – elicited a powerful, historically grounded synthesis that gave gravitas to the BOAI. In effect, the Budapest Initiative stated, Open Access was not the hastily cobbled up conceit of a small, marginal band of scholars and scientists dissatisfied with their communication system; instead, it asserted anew the central position of communication as the foundation of the scientific enterprise. Communication, as William D. Harvey famously posited, is the “essence of science,” and thanks to the Internet, scientific communication could be further conceived as the distributed system of human intelligence….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15

“The 15th anniversary of the BOAI offers an opportunity to take stock of our collective progress. To do this, feedback was solicited through an open survey, and we received responses from 69 countries around the world. Additionally, we have convened a small working group to synthesize the community feedback and use it to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. The Working Group will review and digest the responses received and provide updated recommendations to reflect the current status of the movement. Later this week, we’re looking forward to the release of a comprehensive reflection on where the open access movement has been and where it may be headed, written by Jean-Claude Guédon, one of the original drafters of the BOAI, and a noted thought leader in the open access community. In the meantime, watch the BOAI 15 twitter feed (@TheBOAI) and #TheBOAI starting today for a series of tweets showcasing some of the reactions collected from the wider Open community on the impact of the BOAI and on open access in general. As recommendations are formulated, these will be supplemented with more action-oriented items from members of the BOAI 15 Working Group….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15 survey

“Almost 15 years ago, the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) brought together a diverse group of stakeholders and launched a worldwide campaign for Open Access (OA) to all new peer ­reviewed research. The BOAI deliberately drew together existing projects to explore how they might “work together to achieve broader, deeper, and faster success.” …As we near the 15th anniversary of the BOAI, we’re no longer at the beginning nor are we yet at the end of this global campaign. Again, we will take time to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. Please take this opportunity to reflect and fill in the survey to begin a discussion on the BOAI at 15….”

Budapest Open Access Initiative | BOAI15 survey

“Almost 15 years ago, the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) brought together a diverse group of stakeholders and launched a worldwide campaign for Open Access (OA) to all new peer ­reviewed research. The BOAI deliberately drew together existing projects to explore how they might “work together to achieve broader, deeper, and faster success.” …As we near the 15th anniversary of the BOAI, we’re no longer at the beginning nor are we yet at the end of this global campaign. Again, we will take time to reflect on the values, impact, and continued relevance of the BOAI. Please take this opportunity to reflect and fill in the survey to begin a discussion on the BOAI at 15….”

Open access in the world and Latin America: A review since the Budapest Open Access Initiative

Abstract:  In 2012, the Open Access Movement to scientific information celebrated ten years of existence. The period, which represents the first stage of consolidation of the movement, has been analyzed to allow the planning of new phases. With the purpose of providing tools and contributing to these discussions, the article addresses the historical aspects of the international and regional constitution of Open Access Movement. The approach was developed from a descriptive temporal narrative of the main events and initiatives identified in the scientific literature on the subject. The elements discussed in the present study work were organized under two parameters. The first refers to a temporal perspective, defined from the publication of Budapest Open Access Initiative. The second is related to brief discussion of the participation of Latin America. As result, we present a timeline of open access in the world and in Latin America, showing the main aspects covered in the study. The goal of the study is achieved by the proposed systematization as we analyze the open access initiatives in Latin America and establish how they influenced and were influenced by other regions of the world.