The MFAH Collections | The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

“The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, houses an encyclopedic collection of more than 65,000 works of art created throughout the world, from antiquity to the present. Explore the Museum’s art collections through this searchable database, which is continually being updated. Browse to discover art across time periods, cultures, classifications, and more. Then visit the Museum to experience your favorites in person….”

National Geographic Has Digitized Its Collection of 6,000+ Vintage Maps: See a Curated Selection of Maps Published Between 1888 and Today | Open Culture

“Started as the official journal of the National Geographic Society, the magazine has amassed a huge, 130-year archive of  “editorial cartography,” the National Geographic site writes. “Now, for the first time,” that collection is available online, “every map ever published in the magazine since the first issue of October 1888.” …”

The New York Public Library Lets You Download 180,000 Images in High Resolution: Historic Photographs, Maps, Letters & More | Open Culture

“Most of us Open Culture writers and readers surely grew up thinking of the local public library as an endless source of fascinating things. But the New York Public Library’s collections take that to a whole other level, and, so far, they’ve spent the age of the internet taking it to a level beyond that, digitizing ever more of their fascinating things and making them freely available for all of our perusal (and even for use in our own work). Just in the past couple of years, we’ve featured their release of 20,000 high-resolution maps17,000 restaurant menus, and lots of theater ephemera…..”

Google, CyArk to Build VR Models of World’s Endangered Heritage Sites | Technology News

Google has joined hands with CyArk, a California-based 3D laser scanning non-profit, to build virtual reality (VR)representations of historical sites around the world that are at risk of destruction due to human conflict or natural disasters, media reports said.

The joint effort – called the Open Heritage project – will use CyArk’s (short for cyber archive) laser-scanning technology to capture and archive the imperiled archaeological wonders from all over the world…”

Preserving endangered wonders of the world, for generations to come

“When Ben Kacyra watched on TV as the Taliban destroyed 1,500 year-old Buddhist statues in Bamiyan, Afghanistan in 2001, he felt compelled to do something. Mr. Kacyra, who happens to be one of the creators of the world’s first three-dimensional laser scanning system, realized that his technology could be used to record monuments at risk of damage due to natural disasters, war, or tourism, so that they could be preserved for future generations.

He founded CyArk, a non-profit that has created the world’s largest and most detailed 3D digital archive of endangered wonders of the world—a lasting record of monuments at risk of disappearing. Now, Google Arts & Culture has partnered with CyArk to open up access to their virtual wonders and share their stories with everyone. …”

Connecting to the past in a digital environment | CyArk

“Conveying a sense of wonder and intimacy for the past has been both the most challenging and yet most rewarding part of my work as an archaeologist. Before recently joining CyArk, I worked as the Co-Field Director of the Catalhoyuk Research Project. The newly concluded 25-year research program led under Ian Hodder at the 9000-year old Neolithic site produced a plethora of information on the everyday lives of the original inhabitants of the site. Details, such as the connection between a geometric wall painting and a child’s burial, or that knowing that each stone, found in a cluster by the chest of a buried woman, were distinctively different in colour, were the things that always sparked wonder in me.”

CyArk Wins Inaugural Ptolemy Data Science Award | CyArk

“CyArk was recently named the inaugrual winner of the Ptolemy Data Science Award presented by industry leader Seagate Technologies. Our own VP of Programs, Elizabeth Lee was very proud to accept the award at an event in Chicago in August on behalf of the organization. The beautifully designed award now sits proudly in the CyArk office.

Candidates were evaluated on the basis of Social Impact, Creative Exploration and Scientific Achievement and CyArk was chosen in particular for our “groundbreaking work in pioneering new ways of using data to safeguard and explore human civilization”. …”

Ben Kacyra: Ancient wonders captured in 3D | TED Talk

“Ancient monuments give us clues to astonishing past civilizations — but they’re under threat from pollution, war, neglect. Ben Kacyra, who invented a groundbreaking 3D scanning system, is using his invention to scan and preserve the world’s heritage in archival detail. (Watch to the end for a little demo.)”