Science ouverte le défi de la transparence, Bernard Rentier (Open Science The Challenge of Transparency, Bernard Rentier)

From Google’s English:

“Bernard Rentier, Open Science, the challenge of transparency, Preface by Philippe Busquin, Royal Academy of Belgium, L’Académie en Poche Collection n ° 114, Dec.2018, 152 p. ISBN / EAN: 978-2-8031-0659-2

A new way of conceiving scientific research, open science, was born with the computer revolution. In the wake of Open Access (free access to the results of research funded by public money), it accompanies the great ideal of transparency that today invades all spheres of life in society. This book describes its origins, perspectives and objectives, and reveals the obstacles and obstacles to private profit and academic conservatism.”

What does the recently revisited Belgian copyright law for scholarly publications say, actually ? | Ouvertures immédiates / Immediate openings

My previous blog post triggered a lot of interpretations on the actual content, extend and meaning of the amendments to the Belgian copyright law. The best response is the actual text, translated here….

Except for the potential loophole of the King (i.e. the Federal Government)’s good will who can, for some obscure reason (publishers’ lobbying ?) extend the embargo period in an undefined way, and which appears as a very weak point, the rest of the text is quite strong: the right to re-publish and re-use is mandatory and irrecusable. It overrides any previous contract between the author and the publisher, even anterior to the law itself.

Of course, one would presume it applies to Belgian citizens in a scholarly institution in Belgium, leaving a fuzzy zone when the author is working abroad transiently or when he/she is a coauthor among foreign researchers….”

A small change in a law, a giant leap for knowledge sharing | Ouvertures immédiates / Immediate openings

Having been released at the same time as the first announcement of Plan S, a very important modification of the Belgian copyright law has gone somewhat unnoticed and it should not have! It is indeed a major groundbreaker in the open access to public research communication. The law now allows authors of publicly funded research articles to retain the right to make their original manuscripts freely available, even if otherwise specified in their contract with the publisher.  In terms of the legal protection of the researchers facing the increasingly frequent constraint on the part of funding bodies to make their publications available in Open Access, this law is of paramount importance. To my knowledge, it is the most progressive exception to a national copyright law worldwide to date….”

Open Access Policy KU Leuven – Research

“KU Leuven promotes Green Open Access – that is, providing Open Access at no cost, not to the reader, not to the author.

KU Leuven does not oblige Open Access. KU Leuven mandates the provision of a full text with each journal article published since 29/05/2018 in its repository, Lirias.

From 29/05/2018 onwards all journal articles submitted (accepted/published) or claimed in Lirias 2.0. need to be accompanied by a full text copy of the article….”

YERUN Statement on Open Science | investigación + biblioteca [I+B]

Google English: “The network of young European research universities YERUN (Young European Research Universities Network) has just published YERUN Statement on Open Science

The YERUN network is constituted by the following universities: Bremen, Konstanz and Ulm (Germany); Antwerpen (Belgium); Southern Denmark (Denmark); Autonomous University of Barcelona, Autonomous University of Madrid, Carlos III of Madrid and Pompeu Fabra (Spain); Eastern Finland (Finland); Paris Dauphine (France); Dublin City University (Ireland); University of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy); Maastricht (The Netherlands); New Lisbon (Portugal); Brunel and Essex (United Kingdom); Linköping (Sweden)….”

KU Leuven supports a fair approach to scholarly publishing – Open Access Belgium

“KU Leuven launches the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, enabling the publication of scholarly books and articles in a way that is cost-effective, puts academics back in charge and benefits the public at large. For many years now, opposition against a commercial approach towards scholarly publishing has been growing stronger and stronger. The for-profit model leads to publications which are prohibitively expensive, either for the reader or for the researcher, and typically puts commercial partners in control of the dissemination of scholarly work since researchers have to transfer critical aspects of their author’s rights in order to get published. Alternatives such as Green Open Access (whereby researchers make an archival copy of their publication freely available to all), in most fields, do not challenge the traditional commercial publication model enough. Therefore, another alternative is on the rise, namely Fair Open Access. Publications in Fair Open Access are immediately freely available to all, are produced according to cost-effective (rather than commercial) principles and guarantee full control of researchers over the entire publication process. KU Leuven has been supporting Green Open Access for many years already, and now intensifies its efforts to maximize scholarly exchange, collaboration and innovation by creating the KU Leuven Fund for Fair Open Access, administered by KU Leuven Libraries. This fund provides financial support for the production costs of books published by Leuven University Press as well as articles in selected journals, on the condition that these journals are published according to the Fair Open Access model and maintain the highest academic standards. More information and application forms can be found here.”

The right to share in Open Access

“It can be difficult for researchers to understand what are their author rights, what articles they can archive in Open Access… Fortunately, political decisions are taken across Europe to strongly authorize free dissemination of knowledge. In Belgium, Wallonia-Brussels Federation has presented a decree in order to authorize the Open Access deposit of publicly funded research. Moreover, the federal government plans to propose a bill in this regard in 2018. The preliminary draft decree defining an Open access policy for publicly funded scientific publications in Wallonia-Brussels Federation (FWB) has passed second reading by the FWB government. This preliminary draft decree proposed by the Minister of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Media Jean-Claude Marcourt is intended to allow scientific publications of publicly funded research to be freely shared and disseminated. This takes place in the context of the Open Science movement promoted by the FWB.”

The right to share in Open Access

“It can be difficult for researchers to understand what are their author rights, what articles they can archive in Open Access… Fortunately, political decisions are taken across Europe to strongly authorize free dissemination of knowledge. In Belgium, Wallonia-Brussels Federation has presented a decree in order to authorize the Open Access deposit of publicly funded research. Moreover, the federal government plans to propose a bill in this regard in 2018. The preliminary draft decree defining an Open access policy for publicly funded scientific publications in Wallonia-Brussels Federation (FWB) has passed second reading by the FWB government. This preliminary draft decree proposed by the Minister of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Media Jean-Claude Marcourt is intended to allow scientific publications of publicly funded research to be freely shared and disseminated. This takes place in the context of the Open Science movement promoted by the FWB.”

Workshop: IPR, Open Science and Technology Transfer | Agricultural Information Management Standards (AIMS)

“The delicate interplay between ensuring protection of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and fostering knowledge circulation will be at the core of the workshop ‘IPR, Technology Transfer & Open Science – Challenges and opportunities’, which will take place on March 9th in Brussels. Starting from the idea that Open Science does not mean ‘free science’, the participants will discuss the approaches to striking a good balance between protected data and open access to information.

The present Workshop, jointly organised by JRC and DG Research and Innovation, gathers experts in Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), Technology Transfer, Open Science and cloud computing, with a view to analysing the interaction between these elements and, in particular, to understanding to what extent the current European copyright framework is fit for an Open Science setting.

The Workshop is expected to result in a set of policy recommendations to be included in a policy brief following discussions.

Since seats are limited, you are kindly invited to register early in order to secure your place.”

Council of the European Union | Draft Council conclusions on the transition towards an Open Science system – Adoption

“The Dutch Presidency considers Open Science as one of its top priorities in the R&I domain. In this context, the Presidency has proposed draft Council conclusions on the issue.” The doc presents 16 conclusions on the value of OA and open science, with hints that the EU will soon adopt a policy making all EU-funded research OA by default by 2020.