The Economic Logic of ‘Open Science’ and the Balance between Private Property Rights and the Public Domain in Scientific Data and Information: A Primer | SIEPR

“The progress of scientific and technological knowledge is a cumulative process, one that depends in the long?run on the rapid and widespread disclosure of new findings, so that they may be rapidly discarded if unreliable, or confirmed and brought into fruitful conjunction with other bodies of reliable knowledge. “Open science” institutions provide an alternative to the intellectual property approach to dealing with difficult problems in the allocation of resources for the production and distribution of information. As a mode of generating reliable knowledge, “open science” depends upon a specific non-market reward system to solve a number of resource allocation problems that have their origins in the particular characteristics of information as an economic good. There are features of the collegiate reputational reward system — conventionally associated with open science practice in the academy and public research institutes – that create conflicts been the ostensible norms of ‘cooperation’ and the incentives for non-cooperative, rivalrous behavior on the part of individuals and research units who race to establish “priority.” These sources of inefficiency notwithstanding, open science is properly regarded as uniquely well suited to the goal of maximising the rate of growth of the stock of reliable knowledge.

High access charges imposed by holders of monopoly rights in intellectual property have overall consequences for the conduct of science that are particularly damaging to programs of exploratory research which are recognized to be vital for the long-term progress of knowledge-driven economies….”

La reforma europea del Copyright: La amenaza del Open Access y de la Open Science ~ CanalBiblos: blog de la Biblioteca de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

From Google translate:

The European Copyright Reform: The threat of Open Access and Open Science
The coalition, led by SPARC Europe (The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and 15 other organizations representing the academic, library, research and digital rights communities have written an open letter to members of Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee European Parliament on the draft European Parliament Directive on Copyright in the Single Digital Market.

Making Your Research Freely-Available with MarXiv: The (free!) preprint service for ocean-conservation and marine-climate science | OpenChannels: Sustainable Ocean Management and Conservation

“Event Date:  Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 1pm EST / 10am PST / 6pm UTC This webinar will be presented by Nick Wehner, Project Director of MarXiv and Director of Open Initiatives at OCTO. Ocean managers, policymakers, and NGOs routinely face barriers to scientific knowledge: they simply can’t afford costly subscriptions to traditional peer-reviewed academic journals. Studies have found that these financial barriers result in less primary science being used in on-the-ground environmental management plans.”

Coalition for Responsible Sharing

“Following unsuccessful attempts to jointly find ways for scholarly collaboration network ResearchGate to run its service in a copyright-compliant way, information analytics businesses, scholarly and scientific publishers and societies are now left with no other choice but to take formal steps to remedy the illicit dissemination of millions of published articles on the ResearchGate site.

A coalition of publishers, which currently includes the American Chemical Society, Brill, Elsevier, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer, has been created to provide the scientific community and the wider public with information on activities needed to address ResearchGate’s infringing actions that are undermining the viability of scholarly research….”

Making Indian science more open and accessible – IndiaBioscience

“Sridhar Gutam is a senior scientist at ICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bengaluru. He is also the convenor of Open access India, an organisation advocating open access, open data and open education in India….”

Amicus brief in support of Public.Resource.Org from a group of library associations and non-profits

“Access to the Text of the Law Advances Practical Interests of Vital National Importance….Access to the Text of the Law Is a Fundamental Right and Important National Interest, Superior to Private Copyrights….The Standards Organizations Need Not Depend on Copyright Royalties, and Can Be Fully Compensated by Other Means….Multiple Doctrines Involved in This Case Can Account for a Fundamental Right of Access to the Text of the Law….”