Addgene: Homepage

“Addgene is a global, nonprofit repository that was created to help scientists share plasmids. Plasmids are DNA-based research reagents commonly used in the life sciences. When scientists publish research papers, they deposit their associated plasmids at Addgene. Then, when other scientists read the publication, they have easy access to the plasmids needed to conduct future experiments. Before Addgene, scientists were tasked with repeatedly shipping plasmids to each new requesting scientist. Now, scientists ship their plasmids to Addgene once, and we take care of the quality control, MTA compliance, shipping, and record-keeping.

For scientists looking to use plasmids, Addgene provides a searchable database of high-quality plasmids, pooled libraries, and plasmid kits, available at affordable prices. All plasmids in Addgene’s repository are sequenced for quality control purposes and tracked with barcodes from the time they arrive at our facility until they are packed for shipment. Scientists can request plasmids through Addgene’s online ordering system. As of 2016, Addgene also provides ready-to-use AAV and lentivirus preparations of commonly requested plasmids as a service to scientists….”

Seeding Labs

“Instrumental Access, Seeding Labs’ flagship program, empowers scientists in developing countries. It gives them the resources they need to pursue life-changing research and teach the next generation.

To begin, we identify a pipeline of scientific talent. Then we rigorously screen universities and select those with the most potential to advance education and research through Instrumental Access….”

Therapoid, from Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates and enables collaboration among life science researchers around the world!

 

There are highly qualified scientists everywhere. They want to collaborate. However, there is no comprehensive platform for them to do so – until now!

 

The Open Therapeutics’ Therapoid™ scientific ecosystem enables much more than just collaboration.

 

As a web platform for scientific collaboration Therapoid includes:

 

Open biotechnologies for advancing research and gaining publications,

Funding to further develop open biotechnologies,

An asset exchange that hosts freely available equipment and supplies,

A manuscript development process,

A preprint server for hosting manuscripts.

Goals of Open Therapeutics’ include lowering biotechnology and pharmaceutical costs, reducing the risks and time to develop life-saving therapies, and broadening markets for therapeutics, particularly for underserved populations around the world.”

Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates biopharma developments by enabling capable and responsible researchers around the world to collaborate. Open Therapeutics has two components: (i) an open web platform for scientific collaboration known as Therapoid™, and (ii) open biotechnologies for rapid prototyping of therapeutics.

Open Therapeutics™ enables open access, open collaboration, rapid prototyping, meritocracy, and community. The goal is to lower costs, reduce risks and time, and broaden markets for therapeutics.

The Therapoid™ web portal enables international scientists to share research easily, while it also opens a path to develop dormant technologies. Simple to use tools enable more effective collaboration. The combination of collaboration and biotechnologies will lead to better therapeutics for patients in every country….”

Open Insulin Project

“We’re a team of Bay Area biology nerds who believe that insulin should be freely available to anybody who needs it. So, we’re developing the first freely available, open protocol for insulin production. We hope our research will be the basis for generic production of this life-saving drug. Additionally, we hope our work inspires other biohackers to band together and create things nobody has ever thought of before!…”

PsyArXiv Preprints | Suggestions to Advance Your Mission: An Open Letter to Dr. Shinobu Kitayama, Editor of JPSP:ASC

An open letter to the new editor-in-chief of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, urging the adoption of best practices for data sharing, reproducibility, and open science.

New tool could standardize the process of sharing research materials – Tech Transfer e-News – Tech Transfer Central

“Developed by the UK OpenPlant Synthetic Biology Research Centre and the BioBricks Foundation, OpenMTA honors the rights of researchers and promotes safe, responsible laboratory practices. In addition, the tool is designed to work within the practical realm of tech transfer and to be adaptable to the needs of multiple groups globally.

Goals for OpenMTA include:

  • Free access to the tool, with no royalties or other fees except for appropriate and nominal fees for preparation and distribution;
  • The ability for researchers to modify or repurpose materials available through OpenMTA;
  • Unrestricted selling and sharing of materials, whether it’s part of a collaboration or derivative work;
  • Availability to all kinds of institutions including academic, industrial, federal and community research centers

In its approach to tech transfer, Open MTA is designed to reduce transaction costs, support research collaboration across institutions and even nations, and provide a way for researchers and their labs to be credited for the materials they share.”

A trust approach for sharing research reagents | Science Translational Medicine

Abstract:  The core feature of trusts—holding property for the benefit of others—is well suited to constructing a research community that treats reagents as public goods.

[From the body of the article:] “Under an open science trust, reagents are treated as a public-good resource governed by principles that promote the public interest, in this case, open science. Our open science trust agreement codifies these public-good principles. Under its terms, a recipient of research reagents becomes a “trustee” of the reagents. Trustees are bound by principles that specifically prohibit filing any patent claims that would restrict use of the reagents by others. The result is to create and expand an open science community connected by a common commitment to the foundational aims of the reagent generators.

 

A trust is a legal relationship whereby one party—called the trustee—is given control over property but must use it for the benefit of others—called the beneficiaries. In this regard, a trust contrasts with direct legal ownership over property, which allows owners to use the property for their own ends and to prevent others from using or benefiting from it. That is how we normally think about tangible goods such as real estate and intangible ones such as patented biomedical inventions.

 

A trust places a duty on those who possess entrusted assets to manage those assets for the benefit of particular third parties or, in the case of charitable trusts, in furtherance of particular objects that benefit the public. Trusts are created by appointing trustees under a legal document that enumerates specific obligations in dealing with trust property. Private trusts—those with individual beneficiaries—are often used for tax and estate planning purposes. Charitable trusts, by contrast, are dedicated to serving the public, as opposed to particular individuals, and must have definite charitable objects that guide the trustee’s use of trust property. In effect, the “public” constitutes the beneficiary of a charitable trust. Charitable trusts are often administered by a group of trustees whose joint efforts to further the aims of the trust can foster a communal sense of purpose….”

SGC | Structural Genomics Consortium

“The SGC is engaged in pre-competitive research to facilitate the discovery of new medicines. As part of its mission the SGC is generating reagents and knowledge related to human proteins and proteins from human parasites. The SGC believes that its output will have maximal benefit if released into the public domain without restriction on use, and thus has adopted the following Open Access policy.

The SGC and its scientists are committed to making their research outputs (materials and knowledge) available without restriction on use. This means that the SGC will promptly place its results in the public domain and will not agree to file for patent protection on any of its research outputs. It will seek the same commitment from any research collaborator….”

Open Material Transfer Agreement (OpenMTA)

“The Open Material Transfer Agreement (OpenMTA) is a simple, standardized legal tool that enables individuals and organizations to share their materials on an open basis….Developed as a collaborative effort led by the BioBricks Foundation and the OpenPlant Initiative, with input from researchers, technology transfer professionals, social scientists, lawyers, and other stakeholders from across the globe, the OpenMTA reflects the values of open communities and the practical realities of technology transfer….”