Science Journals: editorial policies | Science | AAAS

“The Science Journals support the Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) guidelines to raise the quality of research published in Science and to increase transparency regarding the evidence on which conclusions are based….All data used in the analysis must be available to any researcher for purposes of reproducing or extending the analysis. Data must be available in the paper, deposited in a community special-purpose repository, accessible via a general-purpose repository such as Dryad, or otherwise openly available….”

Monticello archaeologists get boost in study of slavery | Local |

“In 2000, archaeologists at Monticello established the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, or DAACS. It is a collaborative, online database where archaeologists can upload and share data about artifacts found during excavations of slavery sites at Monticello and other places in the Chesapeake region, according to Fraser Neiman, director of archaeology at Monticello….

The Natural History Museum is going high tech to save its archive | WIRED UK

“London’s Natural History Museum is digitising its specimens – all 80 million of them. “We need to record them to create data in aggregate,” says Vince Smith, the museum’s head of informatics. With the collection including everything from a blue whale skeleton to Martian meteorites, progress is understandably slow: since the project started in 2014, the museum has only digitised 4.5 per cent of the collection. Undeterred, the 11-person digital collections team has set its sights on recording 20 million specimens in the next few years with specially developed kit.”

Addgene Depositors Get More Citations

“Professor Feng Zhang’s original 2013 gene editing paper on CRISPR/Cas amassed nearly 2,400 citations in its first four years (1). In addition to publishing in Science, Professor Zhang deposited the associated plasmids with Addgene. Since then, Addgene has filled over 6,500 requests for these plasmids. While clearly an outlier, this story had us wondering: is there a larger trend here? Do papers associated with Addgene deposits accumulate more citations than those without Addgene deposits? Even more interestingly, could we tell if depositing a plasmid with Addgene causes a paper to get cited more? …So what do we find [from Web of Science]? Lots more citations for the papers with plasmids deposited at Addgene – typically about four times as many as papers without plasmids deposited with Addgene….”

Addgene: Homepage

“Addgene is a global, nonprofit repository that was created to help scientists share plasmids. Plasmids are DNA-based research reagents commonly used in the life sciences. When scientists publish research papers, they deposit their associated plasmids at Addgene. Then, when other scientists read the publication, they have easy access to the plasmids needed to conduct future experiments. Before Addgene, scientists were tasked with repeatedly shipping plasmids to each new requesting scientist. Now, scientists ship their plasmids to Addgene once, and we take care of the quality control, MTA compliance, shipping, and record-keeping.

For scientists looking to use plasmids, Addgene provides a searchable database of high-quality plasmids, pooled libraries, and plasmid kits, available at affordable prices. All plasmids in Addgene’s repository are sequenced for quality control purposes and tracked with barcodes from the time they arrive at our facility until they are packed for shipment. Scientists can request plasmids through Addgene’s online ordering system. As of 2016, Addgene also provides ready-to-use AAV and lentivirus preparations of commonly requested plasmids as a service to scientists….”

Seeding Labs

“Instrumental Access, Seeding Labs’ flagship program, empowers scientists in developing countries. It gives them the resources they need to pursue life-changing research and teach the next generation.

To begin, we identify a pipeline of scientific talent. Then we rigorously screen universities and select those with the most potential to advance education and research through Instrumental Access….”

Therapoid, from Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates and enables collaboration among life science researchers around the world!


There are highly qualified scientists everywhere. They want to collaborate. However, there is no comprehensive platform for them to do so – until now!


The Open Therapeutics’ Therapoid™ scientific ecosystem enables much more than just collaboration.


As a web platform for scientific collaboration Therapoid includes:


Open biotechnologies for advancing research and gaining publications,

Funding to further develop open biotechnologies,

An asset exchange that hosts freely available equipment and supplies,

A manuscript development process,

A preprint server for hosting manuscripts.

Goals of Open Therapeutics’ include lowering biotechnology and pharmaceutical costs, reducing the risks and time to develop life-saving therapies, and broadening markets for therapeutics, particularly for underserved populations around the world.”

Open Therapeutics

“Open Therapeutics™ facilitates biopharma developments by enabling capable and responsible researchers around the world to collaborate. Open Therapeutics has two components: (i) an open web platform for scientific collaboration known as Therapoid™, and (ii) open biotechnologies for rapid prototyping of therapeutics.

Open Therapeutics™ enables open access, open collaboration, rapid prototyping, meritocracy, and community. The goal is to lower costs, reduce risks and time, and broaden markets for therapeutics.

The Therapoid™ web portal enables international scientists to share research easily, while it also opens a path to develop dormant technologies. Simple to use tools enable more effective collaboration. The combination of collaboration and biotechnologies will lead to better therapeutics for patients in every country….”

Open Insulin Project

“We’re a team of Bay Area biology nerds who believe that insulin should be freely available to anybody who needs it. So, we’re developing the first freely available, open protocol for insulin production. We hope our research will be the basis for generic production of this life-saving drug. Additionally, we hope our work inspires other biohackers to band together and create things nobody has ever thought of before!…”

PsyArXiv Preprints | Suggestions to Advance Your Mission: An Open Letter to Dr. Shinobu Kitayama, Editor of JPSP:ASC

An open letter to the new editor-in-chief of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, urging the adoption of best practices for data sharing, reproducibility, and open science.