Open Data Grant Winners to Conduct Sentiment Analysis of Thousands of French Revolution Pamphlets | Newberry

“Today, you can see trends on Twitter at a glance and get immediate insights into the public discourse surrounding current events. But how can we learn about trending topics and public opinion in centuries past? The recipients of the Newberry’s Open Data Grant intend to find out. The Open Data Grant helps support innovative scholarship that applies technologies such as digital mapping, text mining, and data visualization to digitized primary sources. Joseph Harder, a chemist and data scientist, and Mimi Zhou, an expert in digital humanities studying early French literature, will use the award to complete a sentiment analysis of the Newberry’s recently digitized collection of more than 30,000 French Revolution pamphlets….”

Monticello archaeologists get boost in study of slavery | Local | dailyprogress.com

“In 2000, archaeologists at Monticello established the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery, or DAACS. It is a collaborative, online database where archaeologists can upload and share data about artifacts found during excavations of slavery sites at Monticello and other places in the Chesapeake region, according to Fraser Neiman, director of archaeology at Monticello….

Do Historians Have to Be Socially Responsible? | History News Network

“But the challenge for historians, I suggest, lies equally in communicating their expert knowledge to people. As we question ourselves about the need to make history publicly significant and useful, it becomes important to debate how we are communicating historical knowledge and interpretations as we move towards a digital age and open access to academic knowledge….”

Nine post-Harvey research projects receive funding from Rice

“The Harvey Memories Project [about the 2017 Hurrican Harvey] will launch and maintain a state-of-the-art, open-access digital repository to collect, preserve and publish community-contributed memories of the storm in multiple formats, such as photos documenting storm preparations, audio and video recordings of the storm in progress and survivors’ narratives….”

Colonial North America at Harvard Library

“Colonial North America at Harvard Library provides access to remarkable and wide-ranging materials digitized as part of an ongoing, multi-year project. When complete, the project will make available to the world approximately 470,000 digitized pages of all known archival and manuscript materials in the Harvard Library that relate to 17th- and 18th-century North America. At present, there are nearly 300,000 digitized pages available through this website and updates are made periodically. The items linked to the map below illustrate the nature of the materials in the collection. Not only documenting life in New England, the collection also extends well beyond those boundaries to Canada, other areas of North America, and South America; to Atlantic islands and across the Atlantic Ocean to Great Britain, continental Europe, and parts of Africa. Curated features on the website provide a deeper look at several topical areas and suggest ways of approaching the use of different kinds of materials to gain new insights. This website is updated regularly, so please check back for newly digitized content and features….”

Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books | Science

Abstract:  We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‘culturomics,’ focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.

Early Music Sources

“The aim of this website is to simplify the access to the vast amount of online early music sources. The sources database as well as the iconography database enable quick search and gateway to sources according to various categories. For further research you may refer to RISM (sources) and RIDIM (iconography).

In addition to the databases, Early Music Sources also features a youtube series dealing with various topics relating to early music….”

Roy’s World | Dan Cohen

“[Roy Rosenzweig’s] passion for open access to historical documents has come to fruition in countless online archives and the Digital Public Library of America. His drive to democratize not only access to history but also the historical record itself—especially its inclusion of marginalized voices—can been seen in the recent emphasis on community archive-building. His belief that history should be a broad-based shared enterprise, rather than the province of the ivory tower, can be found in crowdsourcing efforts and tools that allow for widespread community curation, digital preservation, and self-documentation….”

WarSampo: Publishing and Using Linked Open Data about the Second World War

“The WarSampo system 1) initiates and fosters large scale Linked Open Data (LOD) publication of WW2 data from distributed, heterogeneous data silos and 2) demonstrates and suggests its use in applications and DH research. WarSampo is to our best knowledge the first large scale system for serving and publishing WW2 LOD on the Semantic Web for machine and human users. Its knowledge graph metadata contains over 9 million associations (triples) between data items including, e.g., a complete set of over 95,000 death records of Finnish WW2 soldiers, 160,000 authentic photos taken during the war, 32,000 historical places on historical maps, 23,000 war diaries of army units, and 3,400 memoir articles written by the veterans after the war. WarSampo data comes from several Finnish organizations and sources, such as National Archives, Defense Forces, Land Survey of Finland, Wikipedia/DBpedia, text books, and magazines.

WarSampo has two separate components: 1) WarSampo Data Service for machines and 2) WarSampo Semantic Portal with various applications for human users.”

IsoArcH – An open-access and collaborative isotope database for bioarcheological samples from the Graeco-Roman world

“IsoArcH is an open access spatial database of bioarcheological isotopic data of the Graeco-Roman world. It consists of georeferenced isotopic, archaeological, and anthropological information related to the study of dietary and mobility patterns of human and animal populations. IsoArcH focuses on the Mediterranean region between the 12th c. BC and the 8th c. AD, although some northern European sites are also included….”