WarSampo: Publishing and Using Linked Open Data about the Second World War

“The WarSampo system 1) initiates and fosters large scale Linked Open Data (LOD) publication of WW2 data from distributed, heterogeneous data silos and 2) demonstrates and suggests its use in applications and DH research. WarSampo is to our best knowledge the first large scale system for serving and publishing WW2 LOD on the Semantic Web for machine and human users. Its knowledge graph metadata contains over 9 million associations (triples) between data items including, e.g., a complete set of over 95,000 death records of Finnish WW2 soldiers, 160,000 authentic photos taken during the war, 32,000 historical places on historical maps, 23,000 war diaries of army units, and 3,400 memoir articles written by the veterans after the war. WarSampo data comes from several Finnish organizations and sources, such as National Archives, Defense Forces, Land Survey of Finland, Wikipedia/DBpedia, text books, and magazines.

WarSampo has two separate components: 1) WarSampo Data Service for machines and 2) WarSampo Semantic Portal with various applications for human users.”

IsoArcH – An open-access and collaborative isotope database for bioarcheological samples from the Graeco-Roman world

“IsoArcH is an open access spatial database of bioarcheological isotopic data of the Graeco-Roman world. It consists of georeferenced isotopic, archaeological, and anthropological information related to the study of dietary and mobility patterns of human and animal populations. IsoArcH focuses on the Mediterranean region between the 12th c. BC and the 8th c. AD, although some northern European sites are also included….”

Learning to be open: Open Access as a deliberate academic practice – Futures

“I believe open access is the way to do right by one’s research and maintain the integrity of the work, as much as we’re doing right by society at large through our research. We need to also empower early-career academics to know exactly what control they have over their own work, and what can be done with it, and in making a principled decision about access to their research. These decisions need to be considered at the beginning of the research process already and not just at the end. Just as with any new mode of practice, open access has a learning curve that requires deliberate and purposeful practice, but pays off very quickly in terms of citations, research impact, and social impact. So the next time you have a paper waiting to be written, look up the open access options in your discipline. In the meanwhile, make sure to find the preprint copies of all your published papers and deposit them in your institutional repository.”

The Colonial North American Project at Harvard University · Colonial North American Project at Harvard

“This website provides access to some of the remarkable materials digitized as part of the ongoing, multi-year Colonial North American Project at Harvard University.

 

When complete, the project will make available to the world digitized images of all known archival and manuscript materials in the Harvard Library that relate to 17th and 18th century North America. Scattered through twelve repositories, these documents reveal a great deal about topics such as social life, education, trade, finance, politics, revolution, war, women, Native American life, slavery, science, medicine, and religion. In addition to reflecting the origins of the United States, the digitized materials also document aspects of life and work in Great Britain, France, Canada, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The ‘Essays’ on this website are the work of a Summer 2015 Arcadia Fellow, Alicia DeMaio, who was one of the first researchers to connect thematically related material from among the images digitized to date….”

Medical Heritage Library – online access to seven centuries of medical history

“The Medical Heritage Library (MHL), a digital curation collaborative among some of the world’s leading medical libraries, promotes free and open access to quality historical resources in medicine. Our goal is to provide the means by which readers and scholars across a multitude of disciplines can examine the interrelated nature of medicine and society, both to inform contemporary medicine and strengthen understanding of the world in which we live. The MHL’s growing collection of digitized medical rare books, pamphlets, journals, and films number in the tens of thousands, with representative works from each of the past six centuries, all of which are available here through the Internet Archive….”

IsisCB Cumulative: Open Access to History of Science Bibliography, 1913-1975 | H-Sci-Med-Tech | H-Net

“A new open access reference resource was released this month: IsisCB Cumulative, a digitized version of the Isis Cumulative Bibliography of the History of Science, spanning sixty years from 1913 to 1975. The full text is available as seven large HTML files corresponding to the seven volumes of the Isis Cumulative Bibliography covering that period….”

Open Marginalis — Open.Marginalis: Tumblr as Platform for Digital Scholarship in Libraries, Archives, and Special Collections

Abstract:  This project overview of Open.Marginalis is an avenue to explore Tumblr as a platform for digital scholarship in libraries, archives, and special collections. As a platform, Tumblr supports clear opportunities for scholarship through flexible display, discovery, and description. Reviewing project goals, operations, and practices, this project overview aims to serve as an accessible point of entry for digital scholarship using this platform.