Recognition and rewards in the Open Era: Turning thoughts into actions | Open Working

“The TU Delft Open Science programme held its very first thematic session on the Recognition and Rewards cross-cutting theme on October 5, 2020. The Open Science Programme currently has 5 projects and 3 cross-cutting themes, from FAIR software to Open Education. This means that the programme core team is composed of members from many different departments (not only within the Library), bringing in their diverse perspectives and skills! But this also poses a challenge on teamwork- we need a way for us to all stay in touch, be able to see and learn from each other’s work, and contribute and provide feedback – hence the idea of the thematic sessions.Ingrid Vos, the leader of the Recognition and Rewards theme, has kindly volunteered to lead this first thematic session. Since this theme relates to everyone’s work within the Open Science Programme, Ingrid wanted to make sure everyone can be effectively engaged in the session and their voices can be heard – more on this below.Key takeaways: A re-examination of rewards and recognition is needed to further fuel the cultural and behavioural changes towards open science TU Delft’s work in this aspect builds upon VSNU’s “Room for everyone’s talent” position paper. Every university in the Netherlands has a committee on Recognition & Rewards. The TU Delft committee is led by Ena Voûte. The Open Science Programme team had fruitful discussions around open research and education behaviours and “products”, how to evaluate, appreciate and reward these, as well as emerging career paths We’d love to hear your ideas and thoughts, both on rewards and recognition and on how you’d like to contribute and participate in these discussions- please use the comment section of this post!  …”

Rethinking Research Assessment: Ideas for Action | DORA

“DORA is developing a toolkit of resources to help academic institutions improve their policies and practices. So far, it includes two briefing documents that offer principles to guide institutional change and strategies to address the infrastructural implications of common cognitive biases to increase equity.

Ideas for Action outlines five common myths about research evaluation to help universities better understand barriers to change and provides analogous examples to illustrate how these myths exist inside and outside of academia. It also offers five design principles to help institutions experiment with and develop better research assessment practices….”

Rethinking Research Assessment: Ideas for Action | DORA

“DORA is developing a toolkit of resources to help academic institutions improve their policies and practices. So far, it includes two briefing documents that offer principles to guide institutional change and strategies to address the infrastructural implications of common cognitive biases to increase equity.

Ideas for Action outlines five common myths about research evaluation to help universities better understand barriers to change and provides analogous examples to illustrate how these myths exist inside and outside of academia. It also offers five design principles to help institutions experiment with and develop better research assessment practices….”

Reimagining Academic Career Assessment: Stories of innovation and change

“This report and the accompanying online repository1 bring together case studies in responsible academic career assessment. Gathered by the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA),2 European University Association (EUA),3 and Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) Europe, 4 the case studies independently serve as a source of inspiration for institutions looking to improve their academic career assessment practices. Following the publication of guidelines and recommendations on more responsible evaluation approaches, such as DORA,5 the Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, 6 and the Metric Tide, 7 more and more institutions have begun to consider how to implement a range of practical changes and innovations in recent years. However, information about the creation and development of new practices in academic career assessment are not always easy to find. Collectively, the case studies will further facilitate this “practical turn” toward implementation by providing a structured overview and conceptual clarity on key characteristics and contextual factors. In doing so, the report examines emerging pathways of institutional reform of academic career assessment…”

Raising research quality will require collective action

” Institutions are committing to working together to determine how their cultural practices, such as emphasizing the importance of novelty, discovery and priority, undermine the value of replication, verification and transparency. That is the goal of the UK Reproducibility Network, which I co-founded earlier this year. It started as informal groups of researchers at individual institutions that met with representatives from funders and publishers (including Nature) who were open to discussions about how best to align open-science initiatives — reproducibility sections in grant applications and reporting checklists in article submissions, for example. Now institutions themselves are cooperating to consider larger changes, from training to hiring and promotion practices….

Our ten university members span the United Kingdom from Aberdeen to Surrey, and we expect that list to grow. Each will appoint a senior academic to focus on research quality and improvement. Figuring out which system-level changes are needed and how to make them happen will now be someone’s primary responsibility, not a volunteer activity. What changes might ensue? Earlier this year, the University of Bristol, where I work, made the use of data sharing and other open-research practices an explicit criterion for promotion….

But these cultural changes might falter. Culture eats strategy for breakfast — grand plans founder on the rocks of implicit values, beliefs and ways of working. Top-down initiatives from funders and publishers will fizzle out if they are not implemented by researchers, who review papers and grant proposals. Grass-roots efforts will flourish only if institutions recognize and reward researchers’ efforts.

Funders, publishers and bottom-up networks of researchers have all made strides. Institutions are, in many ways, the final piece of the jigsaw. Universities are already investing in cutting-edge technology and embarking on ambitious infrastructure programmes. Cultural change is just as essential to long-term success.”

Full article: Open Access and Promotion and Tenure Evaluation Plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire

Abstract:  Department and program evaluation plans at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire were examined to see if these documents provide evidence that could be used to justify supporting the publication of peer-reviewed open access articles toward tenure and promotion. In an earlier study, the authors reveal that faculty members at the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire are more unaware of open access publishing than their counterparts at larger universities. These findings dovetail with other studies that show that faculty members are reluctant to publish in open access journals because of concerns about the quality of those journals. The existing body of scholarship suggests that tenure-line faculty fear publishing in open access journals because it could adversely impact their chances of promotion and tenure. The authors of this current study sought to determine if department and program evaluation plans could influence negative perceptions faculty have of open access journals. The implications of this study for librarians, scholarly communication professionals, tenure-line faculty, departments, and programs are addressed.

 

CAUT signs the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment | CAUT

“The Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) has signed the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), an international initiative to address the overreliance on journal-based metrics in hiring, promotion, and funding decisions and to promote and support equity in the academy….”

Introduction to DORA: a short presentation at the Global Research Council’s virtual Responsible Research Assessment Conference | DORA

“DORA chair, Prof. Stephen Curry made a short introduction to DORA for the Global Research Council conference on Responsible Research Assessment, which was held online over the week of 23-27 November 2020. He briefly explains the origins of DORA, the meaning of the declaration, and how DORA developed into an active initiative campaigning for the world-wide reform of research assessment. In advance of the conference, Curry, and Program Director, Dr. Anna Hatch, contributed to a working paper outlining the state of play regarding responsible research assessment, exploring what it means and describing existing initiatives in the space….”

Rethinking Research Assessment for the Greater Good | DORA

“The ScholCommLab in Canada conducted a multi-year project examining more than 850 review, promotion, and tenure (RPT) guidelines in the United States and Canada to better understand academic career advancement. The lab examined how the public dimensions of faculty work, use of the Journal Impact Factor, and non-traditional scholarly outputs were recognized and rewarded in review, promotion, and tenure. Key findings have been represented in a series of infographics for the scholarly community….”

The transformative power of values-enacted scholarship | Humanities and Social Sciences Communications

Abstract:  The current mechanisms by which scholars and their work are evaluated across higher education are unsustainable and, we argue, increasingly corrosive. Relying on a limited set of proxy measures, current systems of evaluation fail to recognize and reward the many dependencies upon which a healthy scholarly ecosystem relies. Drawing on the work of the HuMetricsHSS Initiative, this essay argues that by aligning values with practices, recognizing the vital processes that enrich the work produced, and grounding our indicators of quality in the degree to which we in the academy live up to the values for which we advocate, a values-enacted approach to research production and evaluation has the capacity to reshape the culture of higher education.