OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion on Metrics and Rewards – Hanging Together

“What is the role of metrics and rewards in an ideal open science ecosystem? What are the challenges in getting there? What would collective action look like? The fourth session of the OCLC/LIBER Open Science Discussion series, which brought together a group of participants from universities and research institutes across ten different countries, focused on these questions….”

OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion on the FAIR Principles – Hanging Together

“What is the ideal future vision of an open science ecosystem supporting FAIR data? What are the challenges in getting there? These were the topics of the second installment of the OCLC/LIBER discussion series on open science, which brought together an international group of participants with a shared interest in the FAIR principles. The discussion series, which runs from September 24 through November 5, illuminates key topics related to the LIBER Open Science Roadmap. Both the discussion series and the Roadmap have the mutual goal of informing research libraries as they envision their roles in an open science landscape.

The first discussion in the series addressed the topic of scholarly publishing; a summary of the discussion highlights can be found here. In the second discussion, the focus was FAIR research data. FAIR is a set of broadly articulated principles describing the foundations of “good data management”, aimed at those who produce, publish, and/or steward research data sets, and serving as a set of guideposts for leveraging the full value of research data in support of scholarly inquiry. FAIR research data – that is, data that is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable – is seen as an important component of a broader open science ecosystem….”

Charting a path to a more open future. . . together – Hanging Together

“Last week, representatives from OCLC Research and LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries) presented a webinar to kick off the OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion Series. This discussion series, which takes place from 24 September through 5 November 2020, is based upon the LIBER Open Science Roadmap, and will help guide research libraries in envisioning the support infrastructure for Open Science (OS) and their role at local, national, and global levels.

OCLC and LIBER had initially planned a collaborative in-person workshop to take place at the OCLC Library Futures Conference (EMEARC 2020) on March 3 in Vienna. But with COVID rapidly advancing globally at that time, the event was cancelled, and we took some time to plan a larger series of webinars and discussions. 

There are a couple of key goals for our collaboration. First of all, our organizations want to jointly offer a forum for discussion and exploration, and to collectively stimulate the exchange of ideas. But secondly, we want this activity to also inform us as we seek to identify research questions that OCLC and LIBER can collaboratively address to advance Open Science. 

The LIBER Open Science Roadmap provides an excellent, well. . . roadmap. . . for this effort. The report calls upon libraries to “advocate for Open Science locally and internationally, to support Open Science through tools and services and to expand the impact of their work through collaboration and partnerships.” …”

Open Science Training: How to Implement Methods and Practices in European Research Libraries | ZBW MediaTalk

“How can the principles of Open Science be implemented in European research libraries to enable world-class research? A LIBER working group has addressed this question and developed appropriate training methods and practices. Cécile Swiatek was one of the persons who led the working group and presents the results in an interview. She also tells us why libraries are perfectly suited to play a key role in the change towards an open culture and why it is so important to build networks and share knowledge in this process….”

Open Science Training: How to Implement Methods and Practices in European Research Libraries | ZBW MediaTalk

“How can the principles of Open Science be implemented in European research libraries to enable world-class research? A LIBER working group has addressed this question and developed appropriate training methods and practices. Cécile Swiatek was one of the persons who led the working group and presents the results in an interview. She also tells us why libraries are perfectly suited to play a key role in the change towards an open culture and why it is so important to build networks and share knowledge in this process….”

Webinar Video: Open Science Skilling & Training Programmes Across Europe – LIBER

“From 2018-2020, LIBER’s Working Group on Digital Skills surveyed and interviewed colleagues across Europe to identify examples of good practice in Open Science skilling and training programmes. The case reviews have been gathered and published on Zenodo and highlight the many different approaches taken to Open Science upskilling across Europe. The case studies describe the aims of the training programmes, the audiences, skills prioritised, impact, learning and challenges….

This webinar provides an entry point to these case studies by showcasing a small selection from Denmark and Luxembourg. These skilling and training programmes provide a wealth of information and allow knowledge exchange on different approaches to Open Science skilling. Each speaker briefly describes their Open Science programme and reflects on the successes and challenges they encountered along the way.

During the webinar, participants:

• Discover a range of Open Science skilling training programmes across Europe
• Gain ideas and inspiration on developing OS skilling initiatives in their own organisations
• Discover some of the challenges when setting up OS skilling initiatives…”

Exploring collaborative non-commercial publishing models for Open Access: tender results | Plan S

cOAlition S received a total of 11 proposals for the tender for a study to explore collaborative non-commercial Open Access publishing models for Open Access (a.k.a Diamond OA) published in March 2020. We are pleased to announce that the tender was awarded to a consortium coordinated by OPERAS, including Sparc Europe, Utrecht University, DOAJ, UiT The Arctic University of Norway as partners, and LIBER, OASPA, ENRESSH, Redalyc-AmeliCA and CSI as associate partners.

The study will be delivered by the end of 2020, and regular public updates on progress are planned along the way. The study is financially supported by Science Europe.

LIBER Webinar: The Anatomy of a Transformative Agreement

“An increasing number of LIBER institutions—and also institutions and consortia worldwide—are looking to integrate their Open Access strategies with Transformative Agreements. Such agreements enable institutions to repurpose their subscription expenditures to support open access publishing rather than paywalls.

Transformative Agreements (TA) specifically aim to rein in hybrid publishing costs and liberate the lump-sum payments of subscriptions: authors no longer pay APCs and, instead, their institutions (via their libraries) repurpose former subscription expenditures to remunerate publishers for their editorial services associated with the open access publication of accepted articles. While each agreement is unique and context-specific, TAs share a common goal and seek to adhere to the ESAC Guidelines for Transformative Agreements. In order to better understand the latest benchmarks achieved with TAs, this webinar will present two case studies of TA negotiated by LIBER members, illustrating in what way they are considered to be transformative and providing an open assessment of to what degree they have been successful in achieving their goals.”

Europe Must Take Urgent Copyright Law Action To Support Distance Learning & Research During the Coronavirus Pandemic – LIBER

“During this unprecedented global emergency, LIBER calls on European Commissioners, Member State governments, publishers and authors to urgently help libraries, universities and other educational establishments, so that they can continue supplying researchers, teachers and students with access to books, archives and other instructional materials….”