INOS Workshop Outcomes – Open and Citizen Science in Higher Education: Co-Creating a Shared Vision  – LIBER Europe

“On the 16th of March 2021, we held the first of our two-part vision-building workshop series titled ‘Open and Citizen Science in Higher Education: Co-Creating a Shared Vision’. The workshop was designed to inspire participants to think systematically, share their experiences, challenges, and to jointly find solutions to the commonly identified obstacles when it comes to implementing Open and Citizen Science. 37 staff/faculty members and students from libraries and universities attended and discussed citizen science practices at their institutions and how these practices could be possibly adopted to serve as models practices for other Higher Education Institutions (HEI). …”

#Zero Embargo Campaign – Are You With Us? | LIBER Europe

While the COVID-19 pandemic has surfaced the virtues of Open Access and propelled changes in scholarly communication that previously many feared, the current models of communicating scientific content still maintain unequal access to content.

On the other side of this highly regulated and controlled system, advocates of Open Access are exploring lawful ways to enable researchers to freely disseminate their research and maximize its impact.

The Rights Retention Strategy of PlanS (cOAlitionS) is a much-welcomed initiative that empowers authors to be in control of their own research and the granting schemes of HorizonEurope is another bold move by the European Commission in the same direction. It is now time that policies like these are implemented in all EU Member States and that the countries themselves have the same coordinated and horizontal approach.

Therefore, LIBER proposes a new model law that aims to ensure a zero embargo period for lawful self-archiving on open, public, non-for-profit repositories.

LIBER Webinar: How can libraries help keep Open Science infrastructure free and independent? | Zenodo

While OS infrastructure has been generously funded for years, without more funding, essential services that many of us depend upon are at risk of service degradation, reduced availability and of survival in some cases. Furthermore, much of the infrastructure run by not for-profits is currently free to libraries. However, how long this free service will last unknown since some commercial publishers are diversifying portfolios. An uncomfortable truth is that budgets are now even more strained, and operational and development costs remain in the absence of mid- or long-term funding solutions. OS not-for-profit infrastructure is appealing to academic library directors due to limited financial support. It is crucial that library directors take a leading role in continuing to provide financial support for OS infrastructure, even in such challenging times.

Libraries across the world have raised over 2.9 million euros over several years for OS infrastructure, supporting DOAJ, Sherpa Romeo, DOAB, OAPEN, PKP and OpenCitations. However, some of these infrastructures are still far from reaching their targets. A few thousand euros can go a long way. This webinar brings together voices from the library community who have committed to funding OS infrastructure from all regions of Europe. They offer their own perspectives on why funding remains so important to them and their organisations. Attendees learned:

About the current SCOSS infrastructures who seek funding,
How institutions and library consortia are financially supporting OS infrastructure,
Arguments for justifying financial support for OS within your own institution.

This webinar is jointly organised by LIBER and SPARC Europe within the framework of SCOSS – Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services, which aims to improve the financial position, enhance resilience, and better ensure OS infrastructure sustainability. Speakers represent OS infrastructures, library directors and consortia who have funded OS infrastructure from different regions of Europe.

Help Libraries Find a Role in Innovative Peer Review: Join Our New Working Group – LIBER

“We are looking for professionals working in LIBER libraries who have expertise in areas including peer review, publishing and editorial units or in helping to run advanced repositories. Library staff working on Open Science software, or those responsible for the advancement of Open Science in their institutions, are also welcome….”

OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion on Citizen Science – Hanging Together

“How is Citizen Science—the active contribution of the general public in scientific research activities—developing, and what should research library involvement look like? This final session of the OCLC/LIBER Open Science Discussion series brought together research librarians with a range of viewpoints and practical experiences of this exciting area. Together the group formed a vision of Citizen Science in an ideal future state, and identified challenges that stand in the way of achieving that.

Much progress has been made since 2018, when libraries first identified a potential role in Citizen Science. Since then, several research libraries in Europe have incorporated Citizen Science into their activities—despite the adverse impact of COVID-19—and are working with researchers. We can also see knowledge brokering taking place in this area, one valuable example being LIBER’s Citizen Science Working Group, two members of whom were present at this session. So we’re seeing some momentum for libraries within Citizen Science, though not evenly spread, across Europe….”

OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion on Research Integrity – Hanging Together

“What does research integrity mean in an ideal open science ecosystem and how can libraries contribute to heighten professional ethics and standards required by open science? The sixth session of the OCLC/LIBER Open Science Discussion series brought together a small group of engaged participants focusing on these questions….”

OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion on Metrics and Rewards – Hanging Together

“What is the role of metrics and rewards in an ideal open science ecosystem? What are the challenges in getting there? What would collective action look like? The fourth session of the OCLC/LIBER Open Science Discussion series, which brought together a group of participants from universities and research institutes across ten different countries, focused on these questions….”

OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion on the FAIR Principles – Hanging Together

“What is the ideal future vision of an open science ecosystem supporting FAIR data? What are the challenges in getting there? These were the topics of the second installment of the OCLC/LIBER discussion series on open science, which brought together an international group of participants with a shared interest in the FAIR principles. The discussion series, which runs from September 24 through November 5, illuminates key topics related to the LIBER Open Science Roadmap. Both the discussion series and the Roadmap have the mutual goal of informing research libraries as they envision their roles in an open science landscape.

The first discussion in the series addressed the topic of scholarly publishing; a summary of the discussion highlights can be found here. In the second discussion, the focus was FAIR research data. FAIR is a set of broadly articulated principles describing the foundations of “good data management”, aimed at those who produce, publish, and/or steward research data sets, and serving as a set of guideposts for leveraging the full value of research data in support of scholarly inquiry. FAIR research data – that is, data that is findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable – is seen as an important component of a broader open science ecosystem….”

Charting a path to a more open future. . . together – Hanging Together

“Last week, representatives from OCLC Research and LIBER (the Association of European Research Libraries) presented a webinar to kick off the OCLC-LIBER Open Science Discussion Series. This discussion series, which takes place from 24 September through 5 November 2020, is based upon the LIBER Open Science Roadmap, and will help guide research libraries in envisioning the support infrastructure for Open Science (OS) and their role at local, national, and global levels.

OCLC and LIBER had initially planned a collaborative in-person workshop to take place at the OCLC Library Futures Conference (EMEARC 2020) on March 3 in Vienna. But with COVID rapidly advancing globally at that time, the event was cancelled, and we took some time to plan a larger series of webinars and discussions. 

There are a couple of key goals for our collaboration. First of all, our organizations want to jointly offer a forum for discussion and exploration, and to collectively stimulate the exchange of ideas. But secondly, we want this activity to also inform us as we seek to identify research questions that OCLC and LIBER can collaboratively address to advance Open Science. 

The LIBER Open Science Roadmap provides an excellent, well. . . roadmap. . . for this effort. The report calls upon libraries to “advocate for Open Science locally and internationally, to support Open Science through tools and services and to expand the impact of their work through collaboration and partnerships.” …”