Ricerca, primo sì all’Open Access. Pubblicazioni a pagamento solo per sei mesi – Corriere.it

From Google’s English: “The law on Open Access to scientific publications was approved on Wednesday, March 13 in first reading in the House. Commission President Luigi Gallo’s proposal passed in plenary with 272 votes in favor and 185 abstentions and a vote against, after a rapid journey in the Culture Commission, which accepted various contributions and modifications. Now it will go to the Senate….

The law modifies the copyright and allows the authors of research – scientific and otherwise – the right to publish, after six months from the first publication for a fee, the results of their work for free to ensure open access for all. The right to republish will be applied to those researches that are funded entirely or partially with public funds. The author will remain the owner of this right even if he exclusively assigned the rights of economic use of his work to the publisher or editor….

The approval in the first reading of the Gallo law follows by a few months the announcement of the European Union that last September launched the Plan S which provides that from 2020 the scientific publications financed by public funds must be published in journals or platforms of Open Access.”

Bibliography journals and the world of Open Access: a discussion starting from DOAJ | Salarelli | Bibliothecae.it

Abstract:  Open access journals are playing an increasingly important role in scientific publishing. However, it is hard to find the right way in the huge amount of OA titles available on the net. In this respect DOAJ, a directory based on stringent qualitative selection criteria, represents a fundamental resource for authors, publishers and librarians. This article examines the characteristics of LIS journals listed in DOAJ, highlighting in particular their origin (born- digital or digitized) and the main topics they cover.

La difficile transizione all’Open Access | Scienza in Rete

From Google’s English: “[A]mong the signatories of Plan S there is only one Italian institution, the INFN. The other research centers, such as the CNR or the Universities, have not yet taken a position on this matter. But how much do Italian universities spend to get access to scientific journals and what is the status of Open Access in our country? We asked the CARE Group (Coordination for Access to Electronic Resources), the organ within the Conference of Rectors of Italian Universities (CRUI) that deals, on the mandate of the universities, negotiations with scientific publishers. The level of total expenditure for subscription fee paymentsit is not known, since in addition to the centrally managed contracts by CARE, on which a confidentiality clause however, individual universities acquire autonomously a part of the resources. Regarding the penetration of OA in Italian research, CARE replies: “At the moment there are no quantitative studies on this”, adding that there are no contracts of the type read and publish  with no publisher.”

The University of Udine approves the Open Access Policy – Qui.Uniud

From Google’s English: “The University of Udine approves the Open Access Policy. Institutional Archive with search results, available at https://air.uniud.it/ , meets the best practices and international technical standards on open access….The Udine University has joined this movement more than three years ago. In October 2013 he was appointed an Officer of the University for open access (Prof. Carla Piazza) and set up a working group. In February 2015, the SA approved the Policy on Open Access (OA) to scientific literature that establishes the University’s position with respect to the open access movement, and sets out general criteria for the Library Management Institutional archive then officially established in April 2015. It is being built for a service of the University in support of teachers and researchers (both for deposit procedures in the archive is to negotiate with publishers the republishing rights)….”

 

Stefano Ballerio and Paolo Borsa. Open Access e politiche istituzionali

[From Google’s English] “On November 4, 2004, representatives of 71 Italian universities expressed with the Declaration of Messina its support to the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to the products of scientific research. On 4 November this year, the tenth anniversary of the Declaration, the representatives of our universities have launched a Road Map 2014-2018 which should translate the commitment made ??in an “Italian way” open access. The defining elements of this roadmap would be the “institutional dialogue” and a “common approach to Open Access” (OA), support for the so-called Green Road (the practice of archiving digital copies of the products of the research in institutional repositories open) and the creation of a national policy on the issues of storage, access and re-use of the products of research, especially the publicly funded.
 
So we have a roadmap to get to shared policy in favor of open access and, now, also a proposal for the establishment of a National Association for the promotion of open science, that one of its priorities would of course also the promotion of OA . But as is, to date, the Italian academic context? Detect it, heterogeneity would be too obvious and not even want to inflict readers the usual exercise of censorship of the situations of greater delay. So we will focus on two cases perhaps more dynamic: the University of Trento, who provided the policy model to other universities, and the University of Milan, that even under the pressure of the League of European Research Universities (LERU) has long adopted a policy to support the issues of open access (both work for UniMi: readers are cautioned) …”

Stefano Ballerio, Paolo Borsa. Open Access e politiche istituzionali | Doppiozero

[From Google’s English] “On November 4, 2004, representatives of 71 Italian universities expressed with the Declaration of Messina its support to the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to the products of scientific research. On 4 November this year, the tenth anniversary of the Declaration, the representatives of our universities have launched a Road Map 2014-2018 which should translate the commitment made ??in an “Italian way” open access. The defining elements of this roadmap would be the “institutional dialogue” and a “common approach to Open Access” (OA), support for the so-called Green Road (the practice of archiving digital copies of the products of the research in institutional repositories open) and the creation of a national policy on the issues of storage, access and re-use of the products of research, especially the publicly funded.
 
So we have a roadmap to get to shared policy in favor of open access and, now, also a proposal for the establishment of a National Association for the promotion of open science, that one of its priorities would of course also the promotion of OA . But as is, to date, the Italian academic context? Detect it, heterogeneity would be too obvious and not even want to inflict readers the usual exercise of censorship of the situations of greater delay. So we will focus on two cases perhaps more dynamic: the University of Trento, who provided the policy model to other universities, and the University of Milan, that even under the pressure of the League of European Research Universities (LERU) has long adopted a policy to support the issues of open access (both work for UniMi: readers are cautioned) …”