Open In Order To Succeed: PLOS Cross-Journal Initiative Helps Manuscripts Take Flight

All properly executed science deserves to be published as quickly as possible. One common frustration of scientists related to publication speed is the review-rejection cycle that in action resembles a cross between cycling on a hamster wheel and jumping through a hoola-hoop. To offer authors a way out of this cycle of delay, PLOS launched a journal transfer initiative earlier this year that provides authors an alternative to starting from scratch for papers not initially accepted by a subset of PLOS journals.

How It Works

Manuscripts submitted to PLOS Computational Biology, PLOS Genetics, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases or PLOS Pathogens undergo the usual rigorous peer review. The paper’s editors assess the reviews and if they decide the work does not meet the journal’s criteria for perceived novelty or impact but is sound, well-designed and well-executed, they will offer acceptance and publication in the multidisciplinary journal, PLOS ONE. Publication can take place in as little as three weeks after the offer is accepted by the authors.

Papers which merit publication will go through the peer review and revision process only once, saving authors, reviewers and academic editors time, speeding the way to publication for quality research.

Why It Works

The benefit to authors is that instead of rejecting the paper outright, editors now may use the decision letter to offer either immediate publication or publication after minor revisions. Importantly, to move the paper along faster for authors – rather than moving the goal posts – the same academic editor will consider the revision. This also ensures consistency of the feedback to authors and expedites the work for editors. Provided the authors agree to the offer, the manuscript will be published in PLOS ONE with both the original date of submission to PLOS Computational Biology, PLOS Genetics, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases or PLOS Pathogens and the name of that journal’s academic editor listed in the article’s metadata. As for all articles published by PLOS, this metadata appears together with citation, copyright, data availability, funding and competing interest information.

Open In Order To Succeed

PLOS has piloted this initiative over the past six months and we’re pleased to report that with substantial support from journal editorial boards and uptake from authors, we will continue this initiative that relieves authors, reviewers and editors of some of the repetition involved in publishing while bringing quality work to the public, faster. There are now notifications of the program on the relevant journal “Editorial and Peer Review Process” pages. Alongside existing manuscript transfer routes between PLOS journals, this newest initiative offers an effective means for scientists to rapidly communicate ideas, results and discoveries to each other and to the broader public.

Open Access has changed the way readers and researchers around the world discover, use and reuse the scientific literature. Open data provides opportunities for new analysis, new discovery and even previously unrecognized new directions in research. Together with open source software, open source hardware and preprint servers, forward movement along the path toward a more Open Science has the potential to expand the venues, styles, and frequency of sharing work. Let your manuscript take flight! PLOS authors who take this opportunity for rapid publication in PLOS ONE can play an active role in accelerating the discovery and dissemination of their work. With International Open Access Week right around the corner, what better motto to adopt than Open In Order To Succeed—for it is success that we seek for reviewers, editors and most importantly, all authors.

This article was originally posted on The Official PLOS Blog.

What is the Paris OER Declaration? | United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

“The World OER Congress held at UNESCO, Paris on 20-22 June 2012,…Recommends that States, within their capacities and authority: …Promote and use OER to widen access to education at all levels, both formal and non-formal….Promote the development of specific policies for the production and use of OER within wider strategies for advancing education….Facilitate the re-use, revision, remixing and redistribution of educational materials across the world through open licensing….”

Foundations for OER Strategy Development

“The purpose of this document is to provide a concise analysis of where the global OER movement currently stands: what the common threads are, where the greatest opportunities and challenges lie, and how we can more effectively work together as a community. The first draft was born from a meeting of 26 OER leaders in February 2015. We then shared this document on global and regional OER lists and had in-person discussions with members of the international OER community at the 2015 Hewlett OER grantees meeting, OER15, Open Ed Global 2015, and the CC Global Summit 2015. Comments from all four meetings were integrated into this document.

Our hope is that this document will serve as a starting point for conversations about strategies for mainstreaming OER and extending its reach and impact globally. We also hope that this document, and the strategies within, will evolve as the conversation evolves to provide useful insight for both global coordination and local action….”

Open Science MOOC

“Welcome to the home of the Open Science MOOC! This website is aimed to provide information about our MOOC on Open Science principles and practices, its rational, the current state of the project, and the people behind it. This project was started in early 2017 after a barcamp at the Open Science Conference in Berlin. Soon, more than 30 people contributed and a first draft was made. Now in late summer 2017, already more than 100 volunteers have agreed to share their knowledge about Open Science and to contribute to what they see as an extremely important issue in nowadays and future science. Concomitantly, the European Commission published its report “Providing researchers with the skills and competencies they need to practise Open Science”, supporting the importance of the topic and thereby the necessity to explain, teach and support researchers to gain the necessary skills. We are excited by the support we got so far and we would like to invite everybody to create, comment, contribute and share! Just contact us.  “

Learned societies and open access – Research Consulting

“Since 2015, the Universities’ UK Open Access Co-ordination Group has commissioned a bi-annual exercise to monitor the UK’s transition to open access, including the financial health of learned societies. As part of this exercise, I have been working with Professor Robert Dingwall to assess how 30 UK learned societies have fared between 2011 and 2015.”

Welcome to Louisiana Digital Library | Louisiana Digital Library

“The Louisiana Digital Library (LDL) is an online library of more than 144,000 digital items from Louisiana archives, libraries, museums, and other repositories, making unique historical treasure accessible to students, researchers, and the general public in Louisiana and across the globe. The items in the Louisiana Digital Library are as diverse and interesting as the people and places in Louisiana, with photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, oral histories, and more documenting the state’s history and culture….”

New platform for Louisiana Digital Library | LSU Libraries News & Notes

“The LSU Libraries has developed a new online platform for the Louisiana Digital Library (LDL). Based on the open-source Islandora digital library software, the LSU Libraries Technology Initiatives team developed the updates to include enhanced features, allowing for greater access and discovery to the 171 collections of the LDL. Patrons can now enjoy the large image viewer with zoom capabilities, full text searching within documents, side-by-side viewing options for audio and text transcriptions, and easy mobile access….Seventeen institutions currently contribute photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, oral histories, and more that document history and culture to the LDL. The LDL is managed by the Louisiana Digital Consortium (LDC), which consists of libraries, museums, archives, historical groups, and other institutions across Louisiana….”