scholcommlab

“The ScholCommLab is an interdisciplinary team of researchers based in Vancouver and Ottawa, Canada, interested in all aspects of scholarly communication.

We explore a wide range of questions using a combination of computational techniques (including applied statistics, machine learning, network analysis, and natural language processing), innovative methods (such as Twitter bot surveys), and traditional qualitative methods (such as interviews, surveys, and focus groups) to investigate how knowledge is produced, disseminated, and used.

We are associated with the Publishing Program and the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University and with the School of Information Studies at the University of Ottawa….”

Partnership for Open Access

“The Partnership for Open Access establishes an innovative model for collaboration between university libraries and scholarly journals, and helps provide continuous financial support to Canadian publishers in transition toward complete open access….

Coalition Publi.ca is a strategic partnership created in the spring of 2017 by Érudit and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP). It stems from an intensive and collaborative reflection process within the Canadian research community, aiming to develop a national infrastructure for the open access dissemination of publications in HSS and arts and letters….”

Distributed digital preservation: preserving open journal systems content in the PKP PN | Digital Library Perspectives | Ahead of Print

“This paper aims to discuss the public knowledge project (PKP) preservation network (PN), which provides free preservation services for eligible journals by collecting article content and preserving it in a network of (at the time of writing) eight “preservation nodes” using the LOCKSS system. The PKP PN was launched in June 2016….”

PKP and SciELO announce development of open source Preprint Server system | SciELO in Perspective

“In recognition of SciELO’s twentieth anniversary, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and SciELO Program are entering into an agreement to develop a Preprint Server system on the principles that have guided these two organizations over the last two decades.

These governing principles include recognizing the value of: (a) independent manuscript evaluation systems and related services that are open to the academic community on a global basis, (b) comprehensive workflows for scholarly publishing that include options for preprint and post-publication commentary; and (c) affordable open source software systems for the underlying infrastructure for scholarly communication.

PKP and SciELO plan to collaborate on the building of a Preprint Server system fully interoperable with Open Journal System (OJS) and other publishing systems that will serve SciELO Network journals and that will be made publicly available to other organizations to operate….

Reflections and Directions After PKP’s First Two Decades | Public Knowledge Project

“The Public Knowledge Project (PKP) is entering its third decade. Like any project that has been around this long, PKP is facing the substantial responsibilities of maturity, seeking ways that will enable it to best serve the thousands of people who utilize our software to operate and index the journals and presses with which they work. It is out of this sense of responsibility that PKP, in the fall of 2017, submitted a proposal to the Laura and John Arnold Foundation boldly entitled “Sustaining Open Access’ Most Widely Used Publishing Software.” With this planning grant, PKP contracted the consulting services of BlueSky to Blueprint, with its principal Nancy Maron embarking on an exploration of PKP’s standing and prospects among a sample of those involved in scholarly publishing, including current, former, and potential users of its software.”

Reflections and Directions After PKP’s First Two Decades | Public Knowledge Project

“The Public Knowledge Project (PKP) is entering its third decade. Like any project that has been around this long, PKP is facing the substantial responsibilities of maturity, seeking ways that will enable it to best serve the thousands of people who utilize our software to operate and index the journals and presses with which they work. It is out of this sense of responsibility that PKP, in the fall of 2017, submitted a proposal to the Laura and John Arnold Foundation boldly entitled “Sustaining Open Access’ Most Widely Used Publishing Software.” With this planning grant, PKP contracted the consulting services of BlueSky to Blueprint, with its principal Nancy Maron embarking on an exploration of PKP’s standing and prospects among a sample of those involved in scholarly publishing, including current, former, and potential users of its software.”

Open Access Publishing Cooperative Study: Final Report | Public Knowledge Project

The Open Access Publishing Cooperative Study was a two-year investigation, undertaken under the auspices of the Public Knowledge Project with the support of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The intent of this initiative was to examine whether scholarly publishing models, involving cooperation between the relevant stakeholder, might provide a means of moving subscription journals to a sustainable form of open access publishing. The study explored potential cooperative associations involving disciplines, national initiatives, and regional models. It utilized a series of (a) three case studies, (b) a publishing industry/library survey and interviews, (c) a publishing internship, and (d) a number of related technical developments with Open Journal Systems.

Direct to Full Text Report https://docs.google.com/document/d/1COaY7PM8jXA97b9uMpSQ0a0vYhQGSaDrIooGvd8G2Jw/

 

Migrating bepress Digital Commons Journals to OJS | Public Knowledge Project

 PKP has recently developed an import plugin that is specifically designed to port and preserve Digital Commons journal content into an OJS installation that can then serve as a journal workflow management and publishing platform. This import plugin was developed with financial support from the University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing Services to facilitate the transition of their Digital Commons journal content into OJS 3.1.

Substance Consortium – Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Last year, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (CoKo) partnered to support an open source ecosystem for knowledge creation and dissemination. Today, we are proud to announce that, in conjunction with Consortium Érudit, we are taking another concrete step towards this common goal. Our three organizations have identified Substance, a JavaScript library for web-based content editing, as a critical piece of infrastructure, and are inviting others to join us in a consortium to support Substance.

A consortium of organizations committed to supporting and integrating Substance will lead to the creation of a common-pool resource whose development is driven by community needs. We recognize that web-based multi-party editing of structured documents is needed in the authoring, editing, and production workflows of knowledge creation, and believe that we can best ensure Substance serves all these needs by coming together to support them.

By standing behind Substance, PKP, CoKo, and Érudit are declaring to all interested parties that we are invested in having an open source, general-purpose document editing toolkit that can be integrated into each of our own systems and workflows. We hope that by making this commitment, others will recognize that there is more to gain from jointly supporting Substance’s work rather than building local or custom solutions that cannot easily be used by others….”

NAFTA Negotiations: Authors Alliance Joins Public Interest Groups in Support of Transparency and Balanced Copyright Policy | Authors Alliance

“Today, Authors Alliance joins with other public interest advocates such as Creative Commons, SPARC, Internet Archive, OpenMedia, and Public Knowledge to sign on to a statement in support of transparency and balanced copyright policy in the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The statement was sent to the trade ministries of Mexico, the U.S. and Canada, urging all three countries to make trade negotiation processes more transparent, inclusive, and accountable.

Closed-door trade agreements are not the right forum to create intellectual property policy, particularly when negotiations lack transparency. It is critically important that drafts of international agreements that address intellectual property issues be publicly available for comment so that authors and other stakeholders can weigh in on the proposed rules that will bind all member states. Moreover, such agreements are not flexible enough to account for rapid changes in technology.”