Joint Position Statement on “Data Repository Selection – Criteria That Matter” | Zenodo

Abstract:  Over the past three years, “Data Repository Selection-Criteria That Matter” – “a set of criteria for the identification and selection of those data repositories that accept research data submissions” – were developed by a group of publishers facilitated by the FAIRsharing initiative. Throughout this time, a large number of organizations and individuals have formulated responses and expressed concern about the criteria and the process through which the criteria were developed. Collectively, our organizations consider that the “Data Repository: Selection Criteria that Matter” recommendations – as currently conceived – will act as an impediment to achieving these aims. As such, we are issuing this Joint Position Statement to highlight the community’s concerns and request that the authors of these criteria respond with specific actions.

 

Notify: Repository and Services Interoperability Project – COAR

“Our current research and social context – the coronavirus pandemic, economic upheaval, climate change, racial injustice – requires timely and reliable research results, shared by, and with, all parts of the world.

On January 28, 2021, COAR launched the Notify: Repository and Services Interoperability Project.  The aim of this project is to develop a standard and interoperable approach that will link reviews and endorsements from different services with the research outputs housed in the distributed network of preprint servers, archives, and repositories.

COAR has already developed a proposed model for (bi-directionally) linking resources held in repositories with related resources held in networked services using a distributed, message-oriented approach based on W3C Linked Data Notifications (LDN). The COAR model is described and illustrated in Modelling Overlay Peer Review Processes with Linked Data Notifications.

This project involves working with implementing partners to:

Aid the development of reference implementations of the identified use-cases involving repositories and networked services
Support high-level collaboration to align development in the different implementation projects
Support and encourage broad interoperability by establishing common practices, community norms and conventions
Engage with relevant development communities (e.g. for important repository and service platforms) to gain support with implementation….”

Notify: Repository and Services Interoperability Project – COAR

“Our current research and social context – the coronavirus pandemic, economic upheaval, climate change, racial injustice – requires timely and reliable research results, shared by, and with, all parts of the world.

On January 28, 2021, COAR launched the Notify: Repository and Services Interoperability Project.  The aim of this project is to develop a standard and interoperable approach that will link reviews and endorsements from different services with the research outputs housed in the distributed network of preprint servers, archives, and repositories.

COAR has already developed a proposed model for (bi-directionally) linking resources held in repositories with related resources held in networked services using a distributed, message-oriented approach based on W3C Linked Data Notifications (LDN). The COAR model is described and illustrated in Modelling Overlay Peer Review Processes with Linked Data Notifications.

This project involves working with implementing partners to:

Aid the development of reference implementations of the identified use-cases involving repositories and networked services
Support high-level collaboration to align development in the different implementation projects
Support and encourage broad interoperability by establishing common practices, community norms and conventions
Engage with relevant development communities (e.g. for important repository and service platforms) to gain support with implementation….”

SComCaT: Scholarly Communication Technology Catalogue

This catalogue has been developed by Antleaf for the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) as part of the Next Generation Libraries Publishing project and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

SComCat comprises a catalogue (knowledge base) of scholarly communication open technologies where the term “technologies” is defined to include software and some essential running services. The aim is to assist potential users in making decisions about which technologies they will adopt by providing an overview of the functionality, organizational models, dependencies, use of standards, and levels of adoption of each technology.

The scan includes tools, platforms, and standards that can be locally adopted to support one or more of functions of the lifecycle of scholarly communication, which is conceptualized as including the following activities: creation, evaluation, publication, dissemination, preservation, and reuse.

We envision this scan as being extensible over time in order to address the evolving needs of various communities.

SComCat is built as open-source software, licensed under an MIT License.

Guest post – Correcting the Record: The Critical Role of OA Repositories in Open Access and Open Science – OASPA

“In response to a recent blog post on the OASPA website authored by several publishers’ representatives, COAR would like to underscore the critical role of Open Access repositories in accelerating innovation in scholarly communications and the adoption of Open Access and Open Science.

OA repositories (referred to as green OA in the blog) are central for achieving equitable open access to research outputs world wide. Many researchers around the world do not have the means to pay OA publishing fees (APCs), nor do their governments or institutions have money for transformational agreements. Justice, equity, and fairness are fundamental principles that need to be respected in the transition to full Open Access.

Furthermore, the notions expressed around the version of record are increasingly extraneous in a web-enabled, dynamic environment where researchers can share preprints immediately, peers can review and comment openly, and articles can be continually updated, amended, and extended – something that can be supported and advanced through the repository route. These types of innovations are on the horizon (for example, see eLife’s recent announcement about moving to a publish then review model). It’s time to move beyond the antiquated notion of the version of record that was developed in the print era….”

Asia OA Community of Practice – COAR

“Asia OA is a special forum hosted by COAR in which members of the Asian open access community can share information, meet each other and build relationships. It has a mailing list and organizes meetings to facilitate greater exchange beyond national boundaries.This community is dedicated to people working in the academic environment based in the Asian region. It celebrates Asian cultural diversity and unique way of doing things….

Asia OA was launched in March 2016 with a meeting hosted by the National Institute of Informatics in Tokyo, Japan and has had annual meetings in different Asian countries since then in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (2016), Kathmandu, Nepal (2017), Dhaka, Bangladesh (2019), and Seoul, South Korea (virtual 2020)….”

Input to “Data Repository Selection: Criteria that Matter” – COAR

“There has been significant concern expressed in the repository community about the requirements contained in the Data Repository Selection: Criteria that Matter, which sets out a number of criteria for the identification and selection of data repositories that will be used by publishers to guide authors in terms of where they should deposit their data.

COAR agrees that it is important to encourage and support the adoption of best practices in repositories. And there are a number of initiatives looking at requirements for repositories, based on different objectives such as the FAIR Principles, CoreTrustSeal, the TRUST Principles, and the CARE Principles of Indigenous Data Governance. Recently COAR brought together many of these requirements – assessed and validated them with a range of repository types and across regions – resulting in the publication of the COAR Community Framework for Best Practices in Repositories.

However, there is a risk that if repository requirements are set very high or applied strictly, then only a few well-resourced repositories will be able to fully comply. The criteria set out in Data Repository Selection: Criteria that Matter are not currently supported by most domain or generalist data repositories, in particular the dataset-level requirements. If implemented by publishers, this will have a very detrimental effect on the open science ecosystem by concentrating repository services within a few organizations, further exacerbating inequalities in access to services. Additionally, it will introduce bias against some researchers, for example,  researchers who prefer to share their data locally; researchers in the global south; or researchers who want to share their data in a relevant domain repository, so it can be visible to their peers and integrated with other similar datasets….”

COAR, TCC Africa and AfricArXiv sign partnership agreement – AfricArXiv

“We are pleased to announce that the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) and TCC Africa in collaboration with AfricArXiv have signed a partnership agreement focused on strengthening capacity and infrastructure for Open Science in Africa. …

The aim of the partnership is to work together to foster the concept of bibliodiversity through information sharing, capacity building, and advocacy work, as well as enable AfricArXiv to engage with international peers in Africa and globally about best practices and next generation repository functionalities….”