COAR survey finds no large barriers for repository platforms in complying with Plan S – COAR

“In 2019, a group of funders known as cOAlition S adopted Plan S, a set of principles and requirements for full and immediate Open Access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from the research they fund, beginning in 2021. One of the routes for complying with Plan S is for authors to make the final published version (Version of Record, VoR) or the Author’s Accepted Manuscript (AAM) openly available with an open license in a Plan S compliant repository with immediate OA from the date of publication.

In order to support compliance with Plan S, repository software platforms, repository managers and researchers (who use the repositories) will need to be aware of the requirements and, in some cases, adopt new practices and functionalities. In April/May 2020 the COAR, in consultation with cOAlition S, conducted a survey of repository platforms in order to assess their current ability and intention to support Plan S requirements, and to identify any specific challenges related to their implementation.

The survey found that most repository platforms currently support compliance with Plan S mandatory criteria and, in the few cases where they do not, there are plans to adopt this functionality. In addition, many of the highly recommended criteria are also already supported by the platforms. As a next step, COAR and cOAlition S will continue to work together to ensure that repositories are well represented and to develop more detailed guidance that assist them in supporting the major functionalities envisioned in Plan S….”

COAR survey finds no large barriers for repository platforms in complying with Plan S – COAR

“In 2019, a group of funders known as cOAlition S adopted Plan S, a set of principles and requirements for full and immediate Open Access to peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from the research they fund, beginning in 2021. One of the routes for complying with Plan S is for authors to make the final published version (Version of Record, VoR) or the Author’s Accepted Manuscript (AAM) openly available with an open license in a Plan S compliant repository with immediate OA from the date of publication.

In order to support compliance with Plan S, repository software platforms, repository managers and researchers (who use the repositories) will need to be aware of the requirements and, in some cases, adopt new practices and functionalities. In April/May 2020 the COAR, in consultation with cOAlition S, conducted a survey of repository platforms in order to assess their current ability and intention to support Plan S requirements, and to identify any specific challenges related to their implementation.

The survey found that most repository platforms currently support compliance with Plan S mandatory criteria and, in the few cases where they do not, there are plans to adopt this functionality. In addition, many of the highly recommended criteria are also already supported by the platforms. As a next step, COAR and cOAlition S will continue to work together to ensure that repositories are well represented and to develop more detailed guidance that assist them in supporting the major functionalities envisioned in Plan S….”

COAR Recommendations for COVID-19 resources in repositories – COAR

“Around the world, research related to COVID-19 is being undertaken at unprecedented rates and rapid sharing of early research outputs at the international level is critically important. Many governments and funders are requiring immediate open access to COVID-19 outputs in the form of preprints, data and so on. With over 5,000 repositories around the world providing open access to data, articles, pre-prints and other valuable products of research, the international repository network represents critical research infrastructure. A coordinated and interoperability approach across repositories will to ensure that COVID-19 resources are widely available and discoverable.

To that end, COAR is making the following recommendations for repositories and repository networks: …”

Virtual workshop: Co-designing policies, repository infrastructures and services and strengthening open science communities in Africa

“This LIBSENSE workshop co-organized by WACREN, EIFL and COAR will convene the African community of repository managers and other open access services and advocates and cover three topics:

1) Open Access, Open Science policies and repositories: what works and what doesn’t; 2) repository infrastructure and services: how to build cohesiveness across layers of local, national and regional services; and 3) communities of practice: how to strengthen open science communities in Africa. African participants will share experiences, lessons learned and discuss how to best design effective Open Access and Research Data Management policies and how to progress their adoption and implementation. They will also co-design the guiding principles for institutional repositories to follow in order to build services on top of repositories and cohesiveness across local, national and regional repository services. Together, with breakout groups in Arabic, English, French and Portuguese, we will develop a roadmap for strengthening open science communities in Africa.”

Encouraging Adherence to Values and Principles in Scholarly Publishing | Educopia Institute

“Through the Next Generation Library Publishing project (2019-2022), Educopia Institute, California Digital Library, and Stratos, in close collaboration with COAR, LYRASIS, and Longleaf Services, seek to improve the publishing pathways and choices available to authors, editors, and readers through strengthening, integrating, and scaling up scholarly publishing infrastructures to support library publishers. In addition to building publishing tools and workflows, our team is exploring how to create community hosting models that align explicitly and demonstratively with academic values. …”

Next Generation Library Publishing | Educopia Institute

“In this project, Educopia, California Digital Library (CDL), and Strategies for Open Science (Stratos), in close partnership with LYRASIS, Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR), and Longleaf Services are working to advance and integrate open source publishing infrastructure to provide robust support for library publishing. Our project goals include:

Creating a more balanced, effective academic publishing ecosystem that aligns with academic values and increases choice, opportunity, and innovation via compelling library publishing solutions;
Developing tools and standards that allow better integration of campus repository systems and publishing workflows across the lifecycle of scholarly research;
Establishing sustainable, community-governed, open solutions that rival best-of-breed commercial tools and advance scholarly communication in important ways….”

What should be the essential baseline practices for repositories that manage research data? – COAR

“Good data management is critical for ensuring validation, transparency of research findings, as well as to maximize impact and value of publicly-funded research through data reuse. Repositories provide crucial services that manage and provide access to data, articles, and a wide array of other types of scholarly content and are essential community tools for good data management.

Our response seeks to achieve a balance between the use of best practices for managing data in repositories while at the same time ensuring that requirements are not so overly onerous that they result in excluding a large number of repositories….”

Is overlay peer review the future of scholarly communications? – COAR

“You may have seen the paper published recently by COAR presenting a distributed framework for open publishing services called Pubfair (version 2, after community input), also available in Spanish.

Pubfair is a conceptual model for a modular, distributed open source publishing framework, which builds on the content contained in the network of repositories to enable the dissemination and quality-control of a range of research outputs including publications, data, and more. 

This idea is not new. It is based on the vision outlined in the COAR Next Generation Repositories report  and builds on earlier conceptual models developed by Paul Ginsparg, Herbert Van de Sompel and others. And there are already overlay journals on arXiv, such as Discrete Analysis and Advances in Combinatorics, and other platforms such as Episcience in France, that demonstrate that this can be done at a very high level of quality, for a low price.

We are proposing to expand on these initiatives by developing a highly distributed architecture for overlay services. With decentralization, comes tremendous power. It takes us beyond an environment with many silos, in which every organization maintains its own separate system; to a global, interoperable architecture for scholarly communication. This model can scale; respond to different needs and priorities related to language, region, and domain; and has the potential to set free scholarly communications….”