Call for Speakers and Poster Presentations | Open Science Conference

“Carefully selected talks given by international experts are an essential part of the conference programme. Speakers are invited by the programme committee. With this call we invite you to apply for a talk at the conference. Talks should address Open Science aspects on a broader level and cover topics including (but not limited to):

Reflections on effects and impact of current crises on open research practices and science communication
Lessons learned from crises and approaches to sustainably ensure the opening of science in future
Resume on Open Science practices and their application and acceptance in scientific communities
Overview on existing research on the scientific benefit of Open Science practices and their impact in society such as coping with crises
Overview on Open Science education and science communication to different target groups in the broad public….”

Call for Proposals — Open Education Conference 2020

“The theme of the 2020 Open Education Conference is “Reimagining Open Education.” This theme reflects how the events of 2020 have underscored urgent challenges in education—both new and longstanding—from the rapid pivot online in response to a global pandemic, structural inequities including systemic racism, and barriers to the access and full participation in the exchange of knowledge. 

This year’s conference seeks to inspire attendees to “reimagine” open education as a solution to these many challenges, and also to think critically about how the current practice of open education can be more equitable and inclusive. The theme also applies to the conference itself, which is in the process of “revising” and “remixing” itself as a community-owned event as it enters its seventeenth year.

Reimagining must be an active process. It starts with critical reflection and the formulation of ideas, but it is only meaningful if concrete action follows. In choosing the theme of reimagining, our intent is to spark active efforts to reinvigorate, reinvent, and reshape open education for a more equitable future….”

Call for Proposals — Open Education Conference 2020

“The theme of the 2020 Open Education Conference is “Reimagining Open Education.” This theme reflects how the events of 2020 have underscored urgent challenges in education—both new and longstanding—from the rapid pivot online in response to a global pandemic, structural inequities including systemic racism, and barriers to the access and full participation in the exchange of knowledge. 

This year’s conference seeks to inspire attendees to “reimagine” open education as a solution to these many challenges, and also to think critically about how the current practice of open education can be more equitable and inclusive. The theme also applies to the conference itself, which is in the process of “revising” and “remixing” itself as a community-owned event as it enters its seventeenth year.

Reimagining must be an active process. It starts with critical reflection and the formulation of ideas, but it is only meaningful if concrete action follows. In choosing the theme of reimagining, our intent is to spark active efforts to reinvigorate, reinvent, and reshape open education for a more equitable future….”

Bringing Open GLAM to the world, and the world to Open GLAM | by scann | Open GLAM | Jul, 2020 | Medium

“The call is still open if you want to submit a proposal for a story. We’re evaluating stories on a “first come, first served” basis and we’ll be reaching our limit of stories soon! Don’t overthink it: just send us a title, a short summary of what you want to write, and make sure that your project or case study complies with the Open Definition.

We want to thank Creative Commons for its generous support for the CC Open GLAM Platform; the CC Open GLAM Platform community that reviewed our plans for this year; and the selection committee made up of Douglas McCarthy, co-editor of this publication, Mariana Ziku and Franziska Latell.”

Call for submissions | Open Research Award | University of Groningen

“The University of Groningen Library (UB) and the Open Science Community Groningen (OSCG) launch the annual Open Research Award. The award celebrates the many ways in which academics make their research more accessible, transparent or reproducible.

We welcome the submission of case studies that reflect on the use of open research practices throughout the research cycle (e.g. choice of methodology, preregistration), for presenting research output (sharing data, code) and publishing the results (open access)….”

Call for Proposals: Free Access to Law in a Changing Landscape – Virtual Law Via the Internet 2020

“The 2020 Law via the Internet Organizing Committee is pleased to present our Call for Program Proposals for this year’s virtual LVI conference. The theme of this year’s conference is “Free Access to Law in a Changing Landscape” and it will take place, virtually, on September 22 and 23, 2020….”

Virtual Event Awards

“We aim to improve access to open data science practices and tools and support communities in open data science to grow sustainably and inclusively. We will support these communities with grants for virtual events focused on improving or connecting research-driven data science tools, practices, and the communities themselves.  Proposals must demonstrate the educational and scientific purposes of the event (or series of events) and specifically how it advances Code for Science and Society’s goal to create inclusive knowledge-sharing spaces and support the development of diverse leaders. We aim to invest in both emerging or established events that demonstrate a commitment to making science inclusive and accessible. International applicants are welcome! Applicants are encouraged to make use of resources that provide information on and support for best practices in conference planning….”

Call for Submissions: Innovations in Open | Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

“Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research invites submissions to the “Innovations in Practice” section related to the concept of “open” in libraries.

“Innovations in Practice” is a peer-reviewed section that seeks to describe and evaluate new library initiatives. For our Vol. 15 no. 2 issue (2020), we’re interested in highlighting articles that explore new ways of implementing concepts of openness in libraries. Potential areas for discussion could include, but are not limited to, the following topics within the scope of libraries and archives:

Open data 
Open access platforms and publishing
Open source software
OERs
Wikipedia …”

Call for Submissions: Innovations in Open | Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research

“Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research invites submissions to the “Innovations in Practice” section related to the concept of “open” in libraries.

“Innovations in Practice” is a peer-reviewed section that seeks to describe and evaluate new library initiatives. For our Vol. 15 no. 2 issue (2020), we’re interested in highlighting articles that explore new ways of implementing concepts of openness in libraries. Potential areas for discussion could include, but are not limited to, the following topics within the scope of libraries and archives:

Open data 
Open access platforms and publishing
Open source software
OERs
Wikipedia …”

Community, collaboration, and the commons | trianglesci.org

“When librarians, publishers, and academics talk about “scholarly communication,” we usually have a particular definition in mind: “the system through which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use.” But “scholarly community” is curiously left undefined.

Who is part of this community, and do we really mean to limit scholarly communications dissemination to them? What about the “public”? What about the subjects of our research? Taxpayers? Industry? Students? Most academic authors probably imagine some or all of these as being relevant or important audiences for their work. Yet in many cases the processes, infrastructure, and economics of scholarly communication do not include them, and even when they do, it’s mainly as consumers or supposed beneficiaries of the scholarly work, and not as contributors to it or interlocutors with it.

For the 2020 Triangle Scholarly Communication Institute, we invite proposals from teams that aim to broaden the definition of “community” as it pertains to scholarly communication, and to develop projects and initiatives that will help activate these communities as valued participants in scholarly communication. What can the core constituencies of scholarly communication do to ensure that more of the process is open to collaboration with broader communities, and more of the outputs become part of a globally available commons?…”