Are You Ready to ROR? An Inside Look at this New Organization Identifier Registry – The Scholarly Kitchen

“As a former full-time PID person (until recently I was ORCID’s Director of Communications), I am convinced of the important role that persistent identifiers (PIDs) play in supporting a robust, trusted, and open research information infrastructure. We already have open PIDs for research people (ORCID iDs) and research outputs (DOIs), but what about research organizations? While organization identifiers do already exist (Ringgold identifiers, for example, have been widely adopted; Digital Science’s GRID is still relatively new), until recently there has been no truly open equivalent. But that’s changing, as you will learn in this interview with the team behind the newly launched Research Organization Registry—ROR….”

 

Blog – Europe PMC: The new Europe PMC is here

“It’s time to embrace change. Today Europe PMC proudly unveils a new website, packed with useful features. The improved Europe PMC offers a better search and reading experience, as well as better access to data….”

Pubfair, version 2 now available – COAR

“This is the 2nd version of a paper that was originally published and made open for community comment on the COAR website on September 3, 2019.

We received and reviewed over 25 comments from community members and there was a lot of very useful and valuable feedback which we have incorporated into the revised version.

One of the major revisions was to try to re-articlate Pubfair as a framework (rather than a platform). That is, to describe Pubfair as a distributed content layer, connected to a variety of diverse assessment and dissemination services. This is more in-line with the architecture envisioned through the NGR work.

We would like to thank all of those who provided their valuable input.

As a next step, COAR will continue to work with the NGR Expert Group and other partners on profiling and implementing Pubfair and other models that aim to develop value added services on the distributed repository network….”

Pubfair, version 2 now available – COAR

“This is the 2nd version of a paper that was originally published and made open for community comment on the COAR website on September 3, 2019.

We received and reviewed over 25 comments from community members and there was a lot of very useful and valuable feedback which we have incorporated into the revised version.

One of the major revisions was to try to re-articlate Pubfair as a framework (rather than a platform). That is, to describe Pubfair as a distributed content layer, connected to a variety of diverse assessment and dissemination services. This is more in-line with the architecture envisioned through the NGR work.

We would like to thank all of those who provided their valuable input.

As a next step, COAR will continue to work with the NGR Expert Group and other partners on profiling and implementing Pubfair and other models that aim to develop value added services on the distributed repository network….”

Neues Projekt zur Kompetenzförderung und besseren Vernetzung

From Google’s English: “The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is funding a Germany-wide joint project to create a new national competence and networking platform in the area of ??open access with around 2.4 million euros. The project open-access.network is managed by the Communication, Information, Media Center (KIM) of the University of Konstanz.”

Neues Projekt zur Kompetenzförderung und besseren Vernetzung

From Google’s English: “The Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is funding a Germany-wide joint project to create a new national competence and networking platform in the area of ??open access with around 2.4 million euros. The project open-access.network is managed by the Communication, Information, Media Center (KIM) of the University of Konstanz.”

Co-creating Open Infrastructure to Support Diversity and Equity

“To reframe our priorities in this way requires collective will and coordination across regions and institutions to build new kinds of support for resource reallocation. It further requires institutional courage and political will to declare that open, autonomous, and equitable systems are preferred over “prestigious” Euro-centric research systems that continue to undermine other epistemic communities from around the world. It requires that disciplines and societies prioritize who they have been centering in their research, whose voices they’ve been amplifying, and whose they have been silencing. Supporting the status quo while leaving initiatives that reflect epistemic diversity and knowledge equity as second-tier priorities will result in continued entrenchment of status quo inequities and the marginalization of truly innovative, equitable systems….”

Cambridge Open Engage

“The collaborative platform to upload, share and advance your research

Cambridge Open Engage is the new early content platform from Cambridge University Press, designed to provide researchers with the space and resources to connect and collaborate with their communities, and rapidly disseminate early research. The platform is currently under development using a co-creation approach and we’re inviting researchers to actively input to help us shape the features and functionality. Register your interest below to stay up to date and to participate in its progress!…”

Linked Research on the Decentralised Web

Abstract:  This thesis is about research communication in the context of the Web. I analyse literature which reveals how researchers are making use of Web technologies for knowledge dissemination, as well as how individuals are disempowered by the centralisation of certain systems, such as academic publishing platforms and social media. I share my findings on the feasibility of a decentralised and interoperable information space where researchers can control their identifiers whilst fulfilling the core functions of scientific communication: registration, awareness, certification, and archiving.

The contemporary research communication paradigm operates under a diverse set of sociotechnical constraints, which influence how units of research information and personal data are created and exchanged. Economic forces and non-interoperable system designs mean that researcher identifiers and research contributions are largely shaped and controlled by third-party entities; participation requires the use of proprietary systems.

From a technical standpoint, this thesis takes a deep look at semantic structure of research artifacts, and how they can be stored, linked and shared in a way that is controlled by individual researchers, or delegated to trusted parties. Further, I find that the ecosystem was lacking a technical Web standard able to fulfill the awareness function of research communication. Thus, I contribute a new communication protocol, Linked Data Notifications (published as a W3C Recommendation) which enables decentralised notifications on the Web, and provide implementations pertinent to the academic publishing use case. So far we have seen decentralised notifications applied in research dissemination or collaboration scenarios, as well as for archival activities and scientific experiments.

Another core contribution of this work is a Web standards-based implementation of a clientside tool, dokieli, for decentralised article publishing, annotations and social interactions. dokieli can be used to fulfill the scholarly functions of registration, awareness, certification, and archiving, all in a decentralised manner, returning control of research contributions and discourse to individual researchers.

The overarching conclusion of the thesis is that Web technologies can be used to create a fully functioning ecosystem for research communication. Using the framework of Web architecture, and loosely coupling the four functions, an accessible and inclusive ecosystem can be realised whereby users are able to use and switch between interoperable applications without interfering with existing data.

Technical solutions alone do not suffice of course, so this thesis also takes into account the need for a change in the traditional mode of thinking amongst scholars, and presents the Linked Research initiative as an ongoing effort toward researcher autonomy in a social system, and universal access to human- and machine-readable information?. Outcomes of this outreach work so far include an increase in the number of individuals self-hosting their research artifacts, workshops publishing accessible proceedings on the Web, in-the-wild experiments with open and public peer-review, and semantic graphs of contributions to conference proceedings and journals (the Linked Open Research Cloud).

Some of the future challenges include: addressing the social implications of decentralised Web publishing, as well as the design of ethically grounded interoperable mechanisms; cultivating privacy aware information spaces; personal or community-controlled on-demand archiving services; and further design of decentralised applications that are aware of the core functions of scientific communication.