Opening the record of science: making scholarly publishing work for science in the digital era: ISC Report February 2021

“As a basis for analysing the extent to which contemporary scientific and scholarly publishing serves the above purposes, a number of fundamental principles are advocated in the belief that they are likely to be durable in the long term. They follow, in abbreviated form: I. There should be universal open access to the record of science, both for authors and readers. II. Scientific publications should carry open licences that allow reuse and text and data mining. III. Rigorous and ongoing peer review is essential to the integrity of the record of science. IV. The data/observations underlying a published truth claim should be concurrently published. V. The record of science should be maintained to ensure open access by future generations. VI. Publication traditions of different disciplines should be respected. VII. Systems should adapt to new opportunities rather than embedding inflexible infrastructures. These principles have received strong support from the international scientific community as represented by the membership of the International Science Council (ISC)….”

Opening the record of science: making scholarly publishing work for science in the digital era: ISC Report February 2021

“As a basis for analysing the extent to which contemporary scientific and scholarly publishing serves the above purposes, a number of fundamental principles are advocated in the belief that they are likely to be durable in the long term. They follow, in abbreviated form: I. There should be universal open access to the record of science, both for authors and readers. II. Scientific publications should carry open licences that allow reuse and text and data mining. III. Rigorous and ongoing peer review is essential to the integrity of the record of science. IV. The data/observations underlying a published truth claim should be concurrently published. V. The record of science should be maintained to ensure open access by future generations. VI. Publication traditions of different disciplines should be respected. VII. Systems should adapt to new opportunities rather than embedding inflexible infrastructures. These principles have received strong support from the international scientific community as represented by the membership of the International Science Council (ISC)….”

About The Lens » The Lens awarded $2M USD to strengthen institutional innovation capabilities

Cambia today announced a $2M USD grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to support scaling its prominent open knowledge platform, The Lens, as it launches its institutional toolkits to encourage shared evidence and open data to guide partnering and action for science-based problem solving by institutions….”

Bona Fide Journals – Creating a predatory-free academic publishing environment – Leiden Madtrics

Predatory journals pose a significant problem to academic publishing. In the past, a number of attempts have been made to identify them. This blog post presents a novel approach towards a predatory-free academic publishing landscape: Bona Fide Journals.

LYRASIS and Michigan Publishing Advance Community-owned, Publishing Ecosystem for eBook Distribution and Reading with Open-source System Integration

“LYRASIS and Michigan Publishing announce the successful integration of the Fulcrum platform with Library Simplified/SimplyE and The Readium Foundation’s Thorium Desktop Reader. 

This initiative brings together three open source reading and content delivery platforms, utilizing entirely open standards and technologies. By working together, the partners are improving discovery and access for ebooks and supporting the sustainability and scalability of two community-led social enterprises. …”

LIBER Webinar: How can libraries help keep Open Science infrastructure free and independent? | Zenodo

While OS infrastructure has been generously funded for years, without more funding, essential services that many of us depend upon are at risk of service degradation, reduced availability and of survival in some cases. Furthermore, much of the infrastructure run by not for-profits is currently free to libraries. However, how long this free service will last unknown since some commercial publishers are diversifying portfolios. An uncomfortable truth is that budgets are now even more strained, and operational and development costs remain in the absence of mid- or long-term funding solutions. OS not-for-profit infrastructure is appealing to academic library directors due to limited financial support. It is crucial that library directors take a leading role in continuing to provide financial support for OS infrastructure, even in such challenging times.

Libraries across the world have raised over 2.9 million euros over several years for OS infrastructure, supporting DOAJ, Sherpa Romeo, DOAB, OAPEN, PKP and OpenCitations. However, some of these infrastructures are still far from reaching their targets. A few thousand euros can go a long way. This webinar brings together voices from the library community who have committed to funding OS infrastructure from all regions of Europe. They offer their own perspectives on why funding remains so important to them and their organisations. Attendees learned:

About the current SCOSS infrastructures who seek funding,
How institutions and library consortia are financially supporting OS infrastructure,
Arguments for justifying financial support for OS within your own institution.

This webinar is jointly organised by LIBER and SPARC Europe within the framework of SCOSS – Global Sustainability Coalition for Open Science Services, which aims to improve the financial position, enhance resilience, and better ensure OS infrastructure sustainability. Speakers represent OS infrastructures, library directors and consortia who have funded OS infrastructure from different regions of Europe.

Discoverability in (a) Crisis – ScienceOpen

Abstract:  The coronavirus pandemic has exposed a host of issues with the current scholarly communication system, one aspect being the discoverability of scientific knowledge. Observing the many shortcomings of discovery workflows in the course of COVID-19 confirms that discoverability itself is in crisis. In this article, we analyze the discoverability crisis and its root causes. We introduce open discovery infrastructure as a promising approach for the development of innovative discovery solutions. We present several efforts based on open discovery infrastructure that have emerged to provide better discovery of coronavirus research and discuss what is still needed to overcome the discoverability crisis.

 

Dr Hylke Koers appointed as CIO for new STM Solutions initiative

“STM today announced the appointment of Dr Hylke Koers as Chief Information Officer of its new initiative STM Solutions. STM Solutions has been established to develop and manage forwardthinking shared infrastructures and collaborative services to support the scholarly communications community. Its establishment represents a significant milestone in the collective management of the integrity of the scholarly record for future generations. The initiative will formally launch in April 2021 when Dr Koers commences his new role….”