How Do We Find Ourselves Here? Context for Increased Institutional Investment and Ownership of Infrastructure · Commonplace

“How have institutions become so disconnected from the workflow and publication tools that their researchers depend upon to do research, communicate it, validate it? How can this tremendous outsourcing be corrected? How can universities better understand the need for investing in public infrastructure?

We hope that this reading list will provide background and food for thought….”

Dutch open science deal primarily benefits Elsevier – ScienceGuide

“In summary, the deal boils down to Elsevier offering Dutch (corresponding) authors open access publishing options in nearly all of its scientific journals. However, a number of journals from the Cell and Lancet families have been excluded from the deal, for now. Additionally, both sides agreed to work towards the creation of infrastructure for research data and information, and to enter into ‘open science’ projects. All of this comes at a price of € 16.4 million per year.

Going by headlines in the national newspapers, one would get the impression that the Dutch are making a giant step forward on the path to open access and open science. But is this really the case? ScienceGuide asked experts and (co)negotiators and scrutinized the fine print of the contract. As it turns out, parties have agreed on very specific definitions of open access and open science, with vague articles in the agreement to underpin them. Agreements that are at odds with earlier statements on open science and on rewards and recognition….

However, due to the ‘unique’ nature of the contract, no true comparison can be made with other agreements. Not only because various Elsevier tools and platforms are also included in the contract, but especially because of the arrangements around what has become known as ‘Professional Services’. The market value of the ‘open science’ component is, after all, unknown….”

Project ReShare: Building a Community-Owned Resource Sharing Platform: The Serials Librarian: Vol 78, No 1-4

Abstract:  Project ReShare is a community-driven effort to build an open-source, highly scalable resource sharing platform that supports the research lifecycle from discovery through fulfillment. The project’s initial focus will be on designing tools to facilitate reciprocal borrowing agreements within library consortia, including a shared index, request management system, and workflows for unmediated borrowing. This paper introduces ReShare and describes how the project partners are working to improve the resource sharing experience for library users and staff. It provides background about the project, describes development goals and progress, and addresses future possibilities for ReShare beyond its initial release.

 

Community-Owned Infrastructure

“Data and data analytics are playing an increasingly central role at higher education institutions, and the academic community is at a critical juncture. The growing trend of publisher acquisition of critical infrastructure has underscored a pressing need to understand the changing landscape and develop actions that institutions can—individually and collectively—take to maintain and regain control of data infrastructure. These actions will determine who ultimately controls the research and education process and whether we meaningfully address inequities created by legacy players or simply recreate them in new ways….”

COPIM?

“COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access book publishers and infrastructure providers. It is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable open access book publishing to flourish.

The landscape of open access book publishing stands at a crossroads: one avenue leads to the monopolisation of open access book publishing by commercial publishers and for-profit intermediaries while the other opens up a more diverse, scholar-led, community-owned, and not-for-profit publishing ecosystem.

COPIM is a project dedicated towards supporting these second sets of possibility. It does so by delivering major improvements in the infrastructures used by open access book publishers and those publishers making a transition to open access books. COPIM’s innovations will enable more productive collaborations between people (including librarians, publishers, and researchers) in the open access landscape and expand opportunities to develop the skills necessary to run open access publishing operations….”

New Editoria Release – Oia : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“Oia is the name of the latest Editoria release out today. Oia is part of the municipality of Santorini, Greece. Alex Georgantas, Coko Dev and lead Editoria developer has been hard at work over the last months and we are proud to announce the release of Editoria Oia!

There have been many new features, and some fixes, added to Editoria in this release, however the main item is the new Asset manager. The Asset Manager takes Editoria along a lot of new paths which pushes the tool further into a league of its own wen it comes to professional book creation tools….”

We have no time to waste in the transition to Open Access

“I understand why you say that, but I don’t think that is necessarily the case. cOAlition S has been faulted for focusing primarily on an accelerated transition towards Open Access by legacy publishers and existing journals. But let us not forget that these existing journals are where the grantholders of the cOAlition S funders want to publish. One the one hand, we ask of our researchers that they keep copyright and publish in CC-By. But in return we feel that we have to make sure that they can keep publishing in the journals that they know and love. So that means we decided to focus on creating incentives for the transformation of these journals into Open Access journals, steering them away from the hybrid impasse….

Publishers who wish to stick with subscription journals will have to give their authors the right to keep copyright and to publish in CC-BY, and additionally allow them to immediately deposit a copy of the AAM or the VoR in a Green repository. Note that publishers such as Sage and Emerald already allow authors to deposit their articles in a repository without embargo…..”

Co-designing OA Publishing Infrastructures in Africa Workshop : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“We are very happy to announce the first in a series of four workshops on Co-Designing Open Access Infrastructures. These meetings are particularly focused on Africa and organized by the West and Central African Research and Education Network (WACREN), EIFL and Coko….”

The open scholarship ecosystem faces collapse; it’s also our best hope for a more resilient future | Impact of Social Sciences

“The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly impacting universities and higher education institutions, reducing budgets and presenting new design challenges that will fundamentally alter how research and scholarship operate. Economic volatility is also constraining support for key systems and services that the academy relies on, especially those that are community-led. Kaitlin Thaney argues that there’s a need to converge on community-controlled open scholarship projects, to both meet the demands of the moment, and build a more resilient system for scholarly communication for future crisis situations, and invites readers to participate in planning how such systems can be maintained….

Openness is going to be more radically accepted (even demanded) than ever before post-crisis.

Many key pieces of scholarly research landscape are at risk of going out of business or consolidating by the end of the year. Looking ahead 12-18 months, there is a real threat of infrastructure collapse, the severity and downstream effects of which are not yet fully known at this time.

The current state of funding and resourcing will force institutions to do more with less and to think beyond their walls about shared models of financing….”

The open scholarship ecosystem faces collapse; it’s also our best hope for a more resilient future | Impact of Social Sciences

“The COVID-19 pandemic is significantly impacting universities and higher education institutions, reducing budgets and presenting new design challenges that will fundamentally alter how research and scholarship operate. Economic volatility is also constraining support for key systems and services that the academy relies on, especially those that are community-led. Kaitlin Thaney argues that there’s a need to converge on community-controlled open scholarship projects, to both meet the demands of the moment, and build a more resilient system for scholarly communication for future crisis situations, and invites readers to participate in planning how such systems can be maintained….

Openness is going to be more radically accepted (even demanded) than ever before post-crisis.

Many key pieces of scholarly research landscape are at risk of going out of business or consolidating by the end of the year. Looking ahead 12-18 months, there is a real threat of infrastructure collapse, the severity and downstream effects of which are not yet fully known at this time.

The current state of funding and resourcing will force institutions to do more with less and to think beyond their walls about shared models of financing….”