Internet Archive lawyer Lila Bailey leads a new phase of the battle over copyright | Fortune

“The case involves the Internet Archive’s decision to create a temporary “National Emergency Library” at the height of the pandemic’s first wave—a service that expanded how many e-books clients could borrow simultaneously. The publishing industry sued, saying the non-profit was handing out digital books without permission.

 

The Internet Archive case has received national attention—a widely shared article in The Nation described it as “publishers taking the Internet to court”—and has drawn attention to the reality that, as library branches close over COVID concerns, patrons must often wait 10 weeks or more to borrow the digital version of a best-seller….”

FOSS wins again: Free and Open Source Communities comes through on 19th Century Newspapers (and Books and Periodicals…) – Internet Archive Blogs

“I have never been more encouraged and thankful to Free and Open Source communities. Three months ago I posted a request for help with OCR’ing and processing 19th Century Newspapers and we got soooo many offers to help.  Thank you, that was heart warming and concretely helpful– already based on these suggestions we are changing over our OCR and PDF software completely to FOSS, making big improvements, and building partnerships with FOSS developers in companies, universities, and as individuals that will propel the Internet Archive to have much better digitized texts.  I am so grateful, thank you.   So encouraging.

I posted a plea for help on the Internet Archive blog: Can You Help us Make the 19th Century Searchable? and we got many social media offers and over 50 comments the post– maybe a record response rate.   

We are already changing over our OCR to Tesseract/OCRopus and leveraging many PDF libraries to create compressed, accessible, and archival PDFs….”

Let us know how you’re using our library

“If you check out books from Internet Archive’s lending library, we’d love to hear from you. We are gathering testimonials so that we can describe the impact of our lending library. With your consent below, we will use your feedback in blog posts and other communications about the impact of the Internet Archive’s collection and controlled digital lending, the library practice that powers our lending library. Learn more about our Empowering Libraries campaign: http://blog.archive.org/empoweringlibraries/ ”

Pop! Public-Private Partnerships and the Digitization of the Textual and Cultural Record

“This paper follows these threads to investigate a series of case studies of electronic access to books and cultural heritage, each incorporating some notion of a public-private partnership and some notion of the importance of open access or public good agendas, using as case studies projects like the HathiTrust’s Digital Library, Google Books, and Microsoft’s partnership with the British Library in the ill-fate Live Search Books project. The paper asks how the principles of open social scholarship contribute to a better and more nuanced understanding of digitization as a cultural practice and asks how a better understanding of the networks, partnerships, and paperwork (agreements, policies etc) of digitization could inform developments in open social scholarship. …”

How Controlled Digital Lending Makes an Entire College Library Available to Everyone Everywhere | by EveryLibrary | EveryLibrary | Nov, 2020 | Medium

“When readers need access to a book that is essentially “locked up” in print, help is starting to be on the way through the concept of Controlled Digital Lending. This is an approach to library curation that allows print books to be digitally loaned in an environment that restricted people’s abilities to redistribute or copy the book while providing digital access on e-readers, computers, or even phones. Controlled Digital Lending (CDL) was started so that readers could access books that are out of print or difficult to find but are still in copyright. CDL functions similarly to how a library lends out physical materials. This means that libraries have complete control over the number of copies of each book that is circulating….”

NASIG – Open Access Content Under Threat: Internet Archive and Portico

“With disruptions in print supply chains and cutbacks on server and staff support, the threat of unpreserved content disappearing is greater than ever. Join us for an informational overview and deep dive into how technology is being used to preserve websites and their underlying content. Stephanie Orphan, Director of Content Preservation for Portico will discuss the preservation service’s efforts to preserve OA content and successes in providing access to it when it disappears. Jefferson Bailey, Director, Web Archiving and Data Services at Internet Archive will provide an update on Internet Archive Scholar and its efforts to ensure at risk content remains available.

In 2018, the Internet Archive undertook a large-scale project to build as complete a collection as possible of scholarly outputs published on the web, as well as improve the discoverability and accessibility of scholarly works archived as part of these global web harvests. This project involved a number of areas of work: targeted archiving of known OA publications (especially at-risk “long tail” publications), extraction and augmentation of bibliographic metadata and full text, integration and preservation of related identifier, registry, and aggregation services and datastores, partnerships with affiliated initiatives and joint service developments, and creation of new tools and machine learning approaches for identifying archived scholarly work in existing global scale born-digital and web collections. The project also identifies and archives associated research outputs such as blogs, datasets, code repos, and other secondary research objects. The alpha public interface, not yet officially announced, can be found at https://scholar-qa.archive.org/ and the testing and catalog temporarily hosted at https://fatcat.wiki/. Portico has long been preserving OA content and is currently preserving more than 5,000 OA journals from 309 publishers. They currently provide access to 114 of these OA journals, which were otherwise no longer available online for use by researchers (these are referred to as triggered titles). Portico is actively exploring methods of preserving more of the most vulnerable scholarly content and seeking input from the community on this topic. Whether you are a digital preservation expert or new to the scene, this session will offer something for you.”

Library Leaders Forum Explores Impact of Controlled Digital Lending – Internet Archive Blogs

“The third and final session of the 2020 Library Leaders Forum wrapped up Tuesday with a focus on the impact of Controlled Digital Lending on communities to provide broader access to knowledge. A full recording of the session is now available online.

Michelle Wu was honored with the Internet Archive Hero Award for her vision in developing the legal concept behind CDL. In her remarks, the attorney and law librarian shared her thoughts on the development and future of the lending practice. Wu does not see the theory that she designed 20 years ago as revolutionary, but rather a logical application of copyright law that allows libraries to fulfill their mission….”

Internet Archive to Celebrate the Grand Reopening of the Marygrove College Library – Internet Archive Blogs

“Join us this Tuesday, October 20, at the final session of the Library Leaders Forum for a celebration of the reopening of the Marygrove College Library. Find out how digitization saved a valuable archive and preserved a community’s cultural heritage….”

Publisher Lawsuit Against Internet Archive Puts Future of Book Ownership In Question | WDET

“The newly-launched library serviced a temporary collection of books — about 4 million in total, many in the public domain — with a targeted focus of supporting remote teaching, research activities and independent scholarship. For this service, students paid nothing. 

This Open Library is now at the center of a lawsuit filed by major publishing corporations, including HarperCollins, Hatchett, Wiley and Random House, against the Internet Archives, a nonprofit website, alleging that the Open Library concept is a “mass copyright infringement.”

The lawsuit is scheduled for a federal court trial in 2021.  The publishers are seeking to have the Open Library permanently shut down….

In an op-ed written for The Nation, journalist and new media pioneer Maria Bustillos took a critical look at the lawsuit, the concept of an open library and what ownership means when major publishers seek to change what it means to own a book….”

Internet Archive Joins Project ReShare – Internet Archive Blogs

“The Internet Archive is the newest library to join Project ReShare, a group of organizations coming together to develop an open source resource sharing platform for libraries.

“Internet Archive is pleased to partner with Project ReShare and its member libraries and consortia to build the next generation of library resource sharing tools,” says Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive. “We believe in community-developed software and support library efforts to build systems that address the ever-present challenges of connecting readers and learners with books.”

The project was formed in 2018 in response to concern about market consolidation and the pace of innovation among vendors serving libraries. Rather than rely solely on commercial providers, members wanted to be able to set their own priorities….”