Sign of an unexpected way in which #Brexit could help #openaccess?

“…This doesn’t have to be read as a sign that Brexit could help OA. But here’s how to read it that way. Non-EU nations who clear certain hurdles can already benefit from EU research funds, and those funds are subject to an #openaccess mandate. If the UK leaves the EU, then the EC may lower those hurdles. This wouldn’t increase the amount of money with an OA string on it. (Horizon 2020 is what it is.) But it would spread the European OA mandate to more countries, making OA closer to the default in more places.”

Is Europe about to create an OA label for universities as an incentive to fos…

“Norway has a suggestion for Europe:
http://www.uio.no/om/aktuelt/rektorbloggen/2018/position_paper_from_the_norwegian_universities_web.pdf

[W]e support the idea of a European university label for institutions that actively and successfully promote open science, open innovation and openness to the world. Institutions acquiring the label must document open science skills for project leaders, offer training programs in open science, implement the DORA-principles, support open innovation through digital solutions and promote open science throughout the entire research cycle. These principles should also be fully adapted and implemented in the evaluation processes. The involvement of citizens in projects and stimulating public engagement should be an embedded part of research projects.

The EC seems to like the idea:
https://sciencebusiness.net/framework-programmes/news/moedas-pins-hopes-renewed-innovation-agenda-going-budget-battle

The May 2 spending proposal from the European Commission made Moedas one of the biggest budget winners, with almost €100 billion earmarked for the next research programme, Horizon Europe….Getting countries into his corner, Moedas will know, is a prerequisite for realising his main policy goals, which have been years in preparation. Included in the list of initiatives presented to reporters were many recognisable ideas….The only genuinely new idea, and seemingly a suggestion from Norway, was to create an ‘open science label’ for universities to reward efforts to publish open access science. …”

Open Access Library | OALibrary

“The Open Access Library offers scientific publications for free. No log-in, no price tag. We give publicly funded research back to you. Connect science and society….

Fill out the form below, make your payment, then upload your work. We will ensure that you are in compliance with every open access requirement detailed by your funder. [1] Fill out the form below. [2] Pay the processing fee of €100. [3] Upload your work. [4] Receive your compliance note [to use with your funder] after verification….”

The Development of Open Access in Latin America and Caribbean: Mapping National and International Policies and Scientific Publications of the Region

“In this paper, we map OA publications in Latin America and observe how Latin American countries are moving forward and becoming a leading force in widening access to knowledge. Our analysis, developed as part of the H2020 EULAC Focus research project, is based on mixed methods and consists mainly of a bibliometric analysis of OA publications indexed in the most important scientific databases (Web of Science and Scopus) and OA regional repositories, as well as the qualitative analysis of documents related to the main OA initiatives in Latin America. Through our analysis, we aim at reflecting critically on what policies, international standards, and best practices might be adapted to incorporate OA worldwide and improve the infrastructure of the global knowledge commons.”

Call for tenders: Open Research Europe — The European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform

“Open Research Europe — The European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform

The present call for tender concerns the setting up of a publishing platform for scientific articles as a service for Horizon 2020 beneficiaries. The Platform will provide an open access publishing venue without cost to the beneficiaries of Horizon 2020. The platform will manage the entire publication process, from submission to publication, post-publication curation and preservation, of original articles stemming from Horizon 2020 funding and will implement an open peer-review system. It will also host pre-prints. Published articles and hosted pre-prints will be openly available to all researchers and citizens. Tenderers are called to customize an existing publishing infrastructure solution to the requirements of the European Commission, to develop processes and policies to run the platform as a service, to engage in communication activities for the Platform and to run the service and publish articles in the Platform. The tender is for a Framework Contract with a duration of 4 years….”

Europe set to miss flagship open access target | THE News

“The European Union is set to miss its target of having all scientific research freely available by 2020, as progress towards open access hits a “plateau” because of deeper problems in how research is assessed. Sixty to 70 per cent of universities reported that less than a fifth of their researchers’ peer-reviewed publications are freely available, depending on the type of open access, according to a survey of more than 300 members of the European University Association. 

Only one in 10 universities said that more than 40 per cent of their research was published as “gold” open access, where there is no delay making it public. In 2016, EU member states’ science and industry ministers, supported by the European Commission, backed a move to full open access in just four years. This latest survey asks members about papers published in 2013, 2014 and 2015, so may not capture all progress made to date. But it still concludes that to hit the 2020 target “will require greater engagement by all of the relevant stakeholders”.

This chimes with an EU progress report released at the end of February which concludes that “100 per cent full open access in 2020 is realistically not achievable in the majority of European countries participating in this exercise in the foreseeable future”. Lidia Borrell-Damian, the EUA’s director for research and innovation, said that “unfortunately [full open access] is very difficult to achieve” and that “we have reached a plateau in which it’s very difficult to move forward”.

Open access had taken off in some subjects – like physics, where the open access arXiv pre-print platform is widely used – in which “traditional indicators” of journal prestige such as impact factors and other measures of citations were “less relevant”, she explained. But in most disciplines, these measures were still crucial for burnishing researchers’ career prospects, she added, making it difficult for authors to switch to less prestigious, lower impact factor open access journals. “As long as it [research assessment] is based on these proxy indicators, it’s impossible to change the game,” Dr Borrell-Damian said. Search our database of more than 3,000 global university jobs

This is backed up by the survey findings. The biggest barrier to publishing in an open access repository was the “high priority given to publishing in conventional journals”, a hindrance cited by more than eight in 10 universities. “Concerns about the quality of open access publications” were also mentioned by nearly 70 per cent of respondents. In some disciplines, to publish open access, “you have to be a believer or activist” and it comes “at the risk of damaging your own career”, Dr Borrell-Damian said.

Echoing a long-standing concern in science, she argued that “we need a whole new system” of research assessment that does not rely so heavily on citations and impact factors. The EU’s flagship Horizon 2020 funding scheme requires grant recipients to publish their findings openly, but this was a far from universal policy for national funding bodies, she added. A spokesman for the EU Council acknowledged that “more efforts will be needed overall to accelerate progress towards full open access for all scientific publications”.”

EU research chief’s next act: changing the future of academic publishing | Science|Business

Robert-Jan Smits, one of Europe’s most powerful figures in research, has been appointed as a special envoy on open science at the European Commission, to help push efforts to make all publicly funded research in Europe freely available by 2020.

Open Science (Open Access) – European Commission

“The global shift towards making research findings available free of charge for readers, so-called ‘Open access’, has been a core strategy in the European Commission to improve knowledge circulation and thus innovation. It is illustrated in particular by the general principle for open access to scientific publications in Horizon 2020 and the pilot for research data.”

Information Note: towards a Horizon 2020 platform for open access | European Commission

“Main points: The Commission proposes to fund a European Commission Open Research Publishing Platform (‘the platform’) The main aim of the platform is to offer Horizon 2020 beneficiaries a free and fast publication possibility for peer reviewed articles as well as pre-prints resulting from Horizon 2020 funding.

The platform will complement the current policy in Horizon 2020 – where open access to publication is mandatory – in order to balance obligations with incentives. The platform will be free to use for Horizon 2020 grantees at the point of delivery (the costs being fully covered by the proposed public procurement) and operate on a strictly voluntary basis. Furthermore, the platform will explore many features not found in traditional journals: not only open access but also open peer review, next generation metrics, and access to pre- prints; all of these are important components of Open Science (and part of the 2016 Amsterdam Call for Action).

To implement such a demand –driven platform we need a robust service, on par with the highest quality standards of scientific publishing; this can only be provided by outsourcing the implementation of the platform through a fully transparent public procurement process, allowing any entity to apply. Such an action has therefore been included in the Work Programme 2018.1 Over a duration of 4 years a maximum of 6.4 million € are foreseen for this action….”

Open Access to Research Publications (2012)

“Open Access represents a conscious decision by the League of European Research Universities to investigate new models for scholarly communication and the dissemination of research outputs emanating from researchers….The LERU Roadmap Towards Open Access gives fuller details of Open Access developments and implementations in LERU institutions. LERU strongly advocates that the Horizon 2020 programme adopt the position outlined in this guidance paper….”