Continuing a Publishing Dialogue on Open Science – AIP Publishing LLC

“Some key points we asked OSTP to consider include:

To accelerate open science, researchers need to be incentivized to publish open access and to share their data. Changes to the academic assessment system may be required.
Publishers make significant investments in validating research through peer review and making it discoverable and available in perpetuity. Focusing on making the peer-reviewed manuscript publicly accessible unreasonably ignores the intellectual property and investment the publisher has made into the peer-reviewed author accepted manuscript and the final published version of record (VOR).
Preprints (such as those on the arXiv preprint server) provide immediate access to research results while supporting peer-reviewed journals to fulfill their role of registration, certification, dissemination, and preservation. We encourage OSTP to consider asking Federal agencies to require the deposition of preprints of federally funded research to an appropriate repository as an alternative to making the VOR open without an embargo.
There is a role for publishers and scholarly societies to work with funders to develop standards for data and code, and to develop interoperable systems and processes for storing, sharing and finding data.

The response from AIP Publishing can be read here….”

Enhancing access to the outputs of Federally funded research – Taylor & Francis Newsroom

“We welcome this consultation on public access policy. As part of our ongoing engagement with the OSTP, Taylor & Francis and F1000 Research Ltd have submitted responses to the RFI. Taylor & Francis and F1000 Research’s responses illustrate how we are working on complementary paths to transform scholarly communication in order to accelerate research impact across the whole ecosystem:

Taylor & Francis response
F1000 Research Ltd response…”

Rumored 2020 White House Open Access Policy – SPARC

“In December of 2019, rumors surfaced that the White House might be considering a new national, zero-embargo open access policy. SPARC strongly endorses updating current US policy and eliminating the unnecessary 12-month waiting period for the public to gain access to the outputs of scientific research, including data, articles, and the supporting computer code. We will continue to closely monitor this development and urge the administration to take action to bring the US in line with the emerging global consensus around zero-embargo policies.

SPARC has submitted a letter to the administration supporting a strong open access policy for US federally funded research, and many other stakeholder groups—from students to scientists, patients advocates to publishers—have expressed their support. You can find links to letters from these groups below.

We’ve also seen robust conversation around the potential policy on Twitter at the hashtag #OAintheUSA….”

COAPI response to 2020 RFI – Public Access to Scholarly Information – SPARC

“The COAPI Steering Committee encourages the Federal Government to implement a strong national policy that provides immediate, barrier-free access to the full results of taxpayer-funded research. Such a policy would align with efforts at our member institutions. We would welcome Federal policy that has the following characteristics:

Immediate access to published articles without embargoes
Articles should be openly licensed and made available in open and machine-readable formats that fully enable productive reuse including text/data mining and computational analysis
Data (and code, software, etc.) needed to validate/replicate the conclusions of articles should be made immediately available
Other appropriate data should be FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable)
Free public access to and long-term preservation of these research outputs should be provided via either a digital repository maintained by the funding agency or in an appropriate institutional or disciplinary repository….”

NIST and OSTP Launch Effort to Improve Search Engines for COVID-19 Research | NIST

“Today, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) launched a joint effort to support the development of search engines for research that will help in the fight against COVID-19. The project was developed in response to the March 16 White House Call to Action to the Tech Community on New Machine Readable COVID-19 Dataset….”

Call to Action to the Tech Community on New Machine Readable COVID-19 Dataset | The White House

“Today, researchers and leaders from the Allen Institute for AI, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), Georgetown University’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET), Microsoft, and the National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health released the COVID-19 Open Research Dataset (CORD-19) of scholarly literature about COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, and the Coronavirus group.

Requested by The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the dataset represents the most extensive machine-readable Coronavirus literature collection available for data and text mining to date, with over 29,000 articles, more than 13,000 of which have full text.

Now, The White House joins these institutions in issuing a call to action to the Nation’s artificial intelligence experts to develop new text and data mining techniques that can help the science community answer high-priority scientific questions related to COVID-19….”

Global Officials Call for Free Access to Covid-19 Research | WIRED

“Government science advisers from the US and 11 other countries Friday called on scientific publishers to make all research related to the coronavirus and Covid-19 more freely available.

In an open letter, the advisers, including White House Office of Science and Technology Policy director Kelvin Droegemeier, asked the publishers to make data available through PubMed Central, a free archive of medical and life science research, or through other sources such as the World Health Organization’s Covid database.

The other countries whose officials signed the letter are: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and the UK….”

Global Officials Call for Free Access to Covid-19 Research | WIRED

“Government science advisers from the US and 11 other countries Friday called on scientific publishers to make all research related to the coronavirus and Covid-19 more freely available.

In an open letter, the advisers, including White House Office of Science and Technology Policy director Kelvin Droegemeier, asked the publishers to make data available through PubMed Central, a free archive of medical and life science research, or through other sources such as the World Health Organization’s Covid database.

The other countries whose officials signed the letter are: Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and the UK….”

President Trump’s Science Advisor and Government Science Leaders from Around the World call on Publishers to make all COVID-19-Related Research Publically Available

“Today, the Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and Member of President Trump’s Coronavirus Task Force, Dr. Kelvin Droegemeier, and government science leaders including science ministers and chief science advisors from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, and the United Kingdom are asking publishers to make all COVID-19-related research and data immediately available to the public. …”